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rewardsfromheaven

Does this curriculum exist?

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I am wanting to find a curriculum that teaches all the types of literature (fiction, nonfiction, fantasy, etc.), along with story elements (setting, plot, point of view, etc) but also covers figurative language.¬† Are my expectations too high? Does this curriculum exist? ¬†ūüėä

It would be for students in 3rd-6th grade.

Edited by rewardsfromheaven
forgot to mention ages of students

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1 hour ago, Bay Lake Mom said:

Teaching the Classics.  See the Center for Lit website. 

 

this

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Mosdos Press, a lot can be done with just the textbook.  The workbook adds more to it.  Never found the teachers guide to be necessary.

 

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8 hours ago, rewardsfromheaven said:

I am wanting to find a curriculum that teaches all the types of literature (fiction, nonfiction, fantasy, etc.), along with story elements (setting, plot, point of view, etc) but also covers figurative language.¬† Are my expectations too high? Does this curriculum exist? ¬†ūüėä

It would be for students in 3rd-6th grade.

Hewitt's Lightning Literature does.

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And, totally just my opinion, but grades 3-6 seems quite young to start with literary devices (figurative language, etc.) and story elements in a full-on, formal literature study.

For the average student, grades K-2 are spent in learning to read and becoming fluent with actual reading, while grades 3-6 are spent in developing reading stamina, exposure to vocabulary, and increasing ability to read complex works -- as well as enjoyment of reading through exposure to loads of good and great books.

Typically, that move into a beginning more formal literature study that you are describing is not started until somewhere along in the grade 6-8 range, as analysis requires logic stage development skills, and abstract reasoning that doesn't even begin to start developing in the brain until along about age 12-14.

Of course, if your students are advanced reader/thinker, or they are *wanting* to dig deeper, then that's a different matter and YMMV!

And, with all ages of children, you can do very informal discussion of literature of all types (non-fiction, fiction, novels, short stories, poetry, essays, plays) and genres (realistic, fantasy, sci-fi, mystery, western, horror, etc.), just by stopping occasionally to point out what you like and why -- like, beautiful language or images. Or have fun having everyone predict what might happen next. Or discuss character choices/consequences... etc. Consider having a weekly "poetry and tea" time to just read classic poems (or other pieces of classic literature) for *appreciation* and enjoyment, without formal analysis -- just discussion of enjoyment.

The reason I caution about starting formal literary analysis so early is that many children at those younger ages still have very black-and-white/fact-based thinking, and there is a risk of turning Literature into a sort of checklist mentality and students stop there -- permanently: "I've found the setting, plot elements, symbolism, and a simile, check, check, check, check! My work here is done!" -- instead of continuing to mature and go deeper in their reading and understanding of a work in the high school and adult years, and ultimately finding personal meaning and application, and being able to engage in "The Great Conversation" of the classics that authors and readers have engaged in for centuries.

These two resources can be helpful for keeping a balance:
- Circe Institute, "On Teaching Literature Without Killing It" -- podcast -- linked directly here
- SWB: "What is Literary Analysis (and When to Teach It)"  -- article, and audio workshop

I would also add that those elementary grades -- esp. grades 3-6 -- are such a sweet spot and "window of opportunity" for encouraging children to explore books and reading, to nurture a developing enjoyment of reading through discovering great books and books that 'speak' to the child, and to make some wonderful reading memories together. There will be lots of time in just a few years (middle school) to do more formal literature studies.

That said, I'm sure you are already doing those things, and you know you children best! And if they are ready and wanting to start learning some literary devices and discussion story elements/do beginning analysis, then go for it, and wishing you all the BEST! Enjoy your Literature journey, whatever path that takes. Warmest regards, Lori D.

Edited by Lori D.
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Any traditional literature textbook would hit this. BJU does a particularly good job.

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