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seemesew

Jobs that make $80,000+

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1 hour ago, seemesew said:

I honestly have not seen great benefits for us other than his retirement, which as I mentioned before we are not hopeful he will ever see the way things for teachers have been going in recent years. The other benefits are not what they used to be and the insurance is literally 1/3 of his paycheck for 1 person. 

 

Gracious.  What state are you in (you don't have to answer that if you don't want to.)

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My friend’s 18 year old son can get a job in cyber security with an associates in that field—2 years of college.  He has a pick of jobs if he wants.  Granted, my friend feels that he’ll still need to finish a four year degree to keep the job, but that’s pretty good money.  You have to like hacking into computers though.

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I've been trying to think about what he could do that he could do from home in the IT world for a relatively low cost....

What about AWS (Cloud services) certifications? https://aws.amazon.com/certification/  The cloud is probably 2/3 AWS 1/3 Azure at this point (VERY generally speaking), so if being a cloud architect is interesting to him, I'd get his AWS certification first and then maybe think about Azure behind that. Remote jobs (work from home) with a few years experience are in the $100-150K salary range, and once you're 10-15 years in they push a bit higher. 

My other thoughts are IT big data analytics or IT security.  They are also high in demand and if he's interested in that, pretty easy money.  Most big data jobs are along the coasts, but security jobs are everywhere. For data analytics, he's going to want his CDMP..  Don't worry about whatever his BA is in.  All kinds of people end up in IT, and Katie's point about the fact that if he can both people and IT he's a good candidate is a strong point. https://www.discoverdatascience.org/career-information/data-architect/ 

I'd be hesitant to push to go into the petroleum/chemical engineering field. I have relatives who worked there, and the boom/bust cycle is very, very real.  When it's down, it's generally down nationwide and that makes it hard to stay afloat.  If he's really interested in it, have him sit down with someone who has been in 30-40 years. 

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8 hours ago, mom2scouts said:

Experienced teachers in my low cost area make $70K+ with good benefits. Engineers  and cybersecurity make good money too, but definitely don't start at $80K here.

Wow! That certainly isn't the case here. You have to have been teaching for at least 10 years to get to $50k in my area and I'm in a suburb of a major city. With my stipends for having a master's degree (physics) and for coaching the UIL science team (made it to state level for the first time ever, swept the board at district, top physics student at regionals) and the additional pay for teaching summer school, I still make less than $50k after 5 years of teaching.

The benefits are lousy for teachers here also. My district's insurance is lousy. I've already done district hopping to find a district with better pay and insurance, raised my salary $8k that way over two different district switches. They did switch to a better company that more doctors are actually on this year, but it's really expensive.

I'm trying to find another job to switch to before summer PD starts in August so I can switch careers. I figured data analysis would be good, but I need to learn some newer programming languages. Pascal and Assembler from 30 years ago aren't useful. I want to pick up a couple of certifications, but I need to actually learn the material to do that and am looking for a way to do that that won't cost me too much. I'm on a tight budget.

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5 hours ago, DawnM said:

 

Actually, the CPA is just one type of accounting test.  There are several, and some are better than the CPA for more specialized accounting fields.  It just depends on what you want to go into.  Most people are only familiar with the CPA, but it is worth investigating if you prefer other sorts of accounting than public/corporate.

 

Screen Shot 2019-05-13 at 5.22.04 PM.png

it depends what you're doing. cia is internal  business focused - and cpa is external.  cpa also has much more recognition than a cia.

  dh has a mfa (master financial administration) cia (. and I can be really ticked because he was in the top six, but not #1 the year he took it.  #1 went to the international conference in London that year... yeah, I'm still sulking.), and a cisa.  a cpa would have served him better.

I've talked to a number of accountants who have said a cpa is more useful than the cma (though ds LOVED his cma class, and can see himself doing that.)

so, at the beginning of a career - a cpa is much more useful.

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I don't know how other areas are, but here, an inordinate amount of the "schools" budget goes to OVERHEAD.  and it seems like the more the budget is increased, the more overhead there is.  it isn't going to the classroom teacher and students.  teachers will go get the masters and get into administration, because the administration is well paid.  and there are more and more "administration" - which count against the student/teacher ratio, even though those "administrators" aren't actually IN a classroom.

that's *the unions*!

Edited by gardenmom5
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41 minutes ago, AngieW in Texas said:

Wow! That certainly isn't the case here. You have to have been teaching for at least 10 years to get to $50k in my area and I'm in a suburb of a major city. With my stipends for having a master's degree (physics) and for coaching the UIL science team (made it to state level for the first time ever, swept the board at district, top physics student at regionals) and the additional pay for teaching summer school, I still make less than $50k after 5 years of teaching.

The benefits are lousy for teachers here also. My district's insurance is lousy. I've already done district hopping to find a district with better pay and insurance, raised my salary $8k that way over two different district switches. They did switch to a better company that more doctors are actually on this year, but it's really expensive.

I'm trying to find another job to switch to before summer PD starts in August so I can switch careers. I figured data analysis would be good, but I need to learn some newer programming languages. Pascal and Assembler from 30 years ago aren't useful. I want to pick up a couple of certifications, but I need to actually learn the material to do that and am looking for a way to do that that won't cost me too much. I'm on a tight budget.

You seem to have had the same experience as we have, I'm sorry! 

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A teacher friend maintains pools in the summer to supplement his income. Does your dh want to move into administration at the school?

An out of the box possibility is FBI agent. I have seen news stories that they are heavily recruiting people from various fields right now. It would start at less than 80,000, but I don’t think it takes too long to get above that salary range. 

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We have a public high school science teacher here who makes over $92K and a band teacher who makes $88K (plus benefits). The average family income in this community is just over $40K, so I just roll my eyes when local teachers jump on the "teachers are so underpaid" bandwagon. I know there are teachers who don't make much, but the ones in my city are well compensated.

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1 hour ago, mom2scouts said:

We have a public high school science teacher here who makes over $92K and a band teacher who makes $88K (plus benefits). The average family income in this community is just over $40K, so I just roll my eyes when local teachers jump on the "teachers are so underpaid" bandwagon. I know there are teachers who don't make much, but the ones in my city are well compensated.

someone in my local homeschool group found a link that had what teachers are paid.  there are a few here that make those numbers.  

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11 hours ago, seemesew said:

They are pay pretty well for part time but are not enough to live off and really no way to turn into his own business.

 

  

Side gigs should pay at least what he's making teaching, don't take less. The teachers here have all sorts of businesses of their own; lawn care probably the easiest and it pays well here.  Food trucks also do well.  Adjunct and tutoring of course; adjunct is something you commit to long term and its more to qualify for SS. 

At some point one has to settle in and move up rather than  hop around entry level jobs in different sectors.

The college students graduating now with 80+k salaries are software people w/experience.   After that, its public employee union in a big city...they often start at 55 then move up to 80 in five years around here, excellent pensions/medical; people live in the suburbs and commute in. 

 

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5 hours ago, mom2scouts said:

We have a public high school science teacher here who makes over $92K and a band teacher who makes $88K (plus benefits). The average family income in this community is just over $40K, so I just roll my eyes when local teachers jump on the "teachers are so underpaid" bandwagon. I know there are teachers who don't make much, but the ones in my city are well compensated.

 

Being in NY, those numbers are quite common.  Here they start at 55k, median is 84k, top people are at 115k.  (One of the few occupations here where it doesn't require both spouses to work in order to own a median priced home or qualify for an apt as a youngster).  Retire after 23 years in the low six figures with excellent bennies, usually continue with adjunct until qualifying for SS and continue short term sub contracts while doing so.  seethroughny.com is very helpful to see regional variations.  The job openings of course are mostly in rural schools and in violent urban schools.  Even rural has long wait lists...people tend to go out on maternity and then come back, so its rare to have new hires in anything but special ed.   New grads sub at least two years before finding a permanent job..its rough if they have no family business to help supplement their income.  The salary grid goes up two to five percent annually, unlike nongovernmental jobs.

I roll my eyes on the seniors who are 'living on a fixed income'.  Uh huh.  COLA every year higher than nongovernmental raises, double and triple pensions.  Still living in the McMansion, new car every three years.  Senior citizen property tax exemption.    And that is an idea for the OP....look at reducing expenses. 

 

Edited by HeighHo

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8 hours ago, gardenmom5 said:

it depends what you're doing. cia is internal  business focused - and cpa is external.  cpa also has much more recognition than a cia.

  dh has a mfa (master financial administration) cia (. and I can be really ticked because he was in the top six, but not #1 the year he took it.  #1 went to the international conference in London that year... yeah, I'm still sulking.), and a cisa.  a cpa would have served him better.

I've talked to a number of accountants who have said a cpa is more useful than the cma (though ds LOVED his cma class, and can see himself doing that.)

so, at the beginning of a career - a cpa is much more useful.

 

Isn't the bolded what I have already said?  That was my point.  If you are planning to specialize, there are other tests for different fields.  And some accounting firms require an MA for certain jobs.  DH has known people with an MA and no test vs. people with tests and no MA and often the MA will get the job, depending on the specialty.  I am just saying that a blanket "get a CPA" isn't the only answer, and it could mean you aren't completely trained for that particular area of accounting.

I am curious what you mean about him being #6......where?  In his office?  ranking according to who?  What rank of accountant?  I am not really following.

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3 hours ago, DawnM said:

 

Isn't the bolded what I have already said?  That was my point.  If you are planning to specialize, there are other tests for different fields.  And some accounting firms require an MA for certain jobs.  DH has known people with an MA and no test vs. people with tests and no MA and often the MA will get the job, depending on the specialty.  I am just saying that a blanket "get a CPA" isn't the only answer, and it could mean you aren't completely trained for that particular area of accounting.

I am curious what you mean about him being #6......where?  In his office?  ranking according to who?  What rank of accountant?  I am not really following.

no-  you don't start out with  a narrow focus certification.  because some of those certs are very narrow focus, and only apply to specific areas.

*after* you have become established in a particular area of accounting (that you plan on staying in), go ahead and get one of the more narrow focus certifications. 

if you are starting out, and want to be able to move around, but don't know if you will even be in a very particular area of accounting - get a cpa.

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Would he be interested in moving up in school administration? In the small town where I live, the person with the largest salary is the school superintendent. He makes more than our police chief even.

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1 minute ago, City Mouse said:

Would he be interested in moving up in school administration? In the small town where I live, the person with the largest salary is the school superintendent. He makes more than our police chief even.

Here I'd recommend going to a technologist job or an academic coach job on the way to admin.  

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In my area, if you get into the right union you can end up making $80K and more - this includes teachers AND custodians in the public school system. There was a local city bus driver making over $200,000. And the "great" part is that they can never get fired. 

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6 hours ago, gardenmom5 said:

no-  you don't start out with  a narrow focus certification.  because some of those certs are very narrow focus, and only apply to specific areas.

*after* you have become established in a particular area of accounting (that you plan on staying in), go ahead and get one of the more narrow focus certifications. 

if you are starting out, and want to be able to move around, but don't know if you will even be in a very particular area of accounting - get a cpa.

 

Certainly your opinion and your experience and you are entitled to it.    Dh and his colleagues have gone a different direction and done very well.  In fact, his MA has been the biggest draw for firms, far more so than his test taking.  

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7 hours ago, City Mouse said:

Would he be interested in moving up in school administration? In the small town where I live, the person with the largest salary is the school superintendent. He makes more than our police chief even.

I don't think administration is in his plans. I think he would be amazing he has a talent for things like that! We were  on him getting his master's and that would open up that option if hex wanted to go that way.

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On ‎5‎/‎13‎/‎2019 at 9:17 AM, gardenmom5 said:

computer techs can make that within a year.  it's about three months to get the certs. (it can be done online, at home.)  he already has a degree (even if it is in something else.)

classics major dd (with comp certs) has been making enough to support a family in our hcol area for years.  last fall she hired a guy who came from teaching, with the computer certs, for around that much.

 

On ‎5‎/‎13‎/‎2019 at 2:09 PM, seemesew said:

Do you have a suggestion where to go for those classes or certification?

there are "programs" that will walk you through them all, and give you something at the end, or you can do them individually, on your own.  you can put these on a resume.

On ‎5‎/‎13‎/‎2019 at 2:29 PM, linguistmama said:

I am also interested in this as I am considering transitioning to an IT career.  Google brings up so many options that I am not sure where to start.

Ok - someone PM'd me on this, so I got the info from DD, and thought I'd go ahead and post it here as some are interested.   

 

   

Ultimately you will be a developer or an operations/sysadmin. Knowing what I do now, I would have started with CompTIA certs, A+, Network+, Server+, Linux+, which are broad based. Microsoft and Cisco certs prove limiting, unless you plan to stay and specialize in their ecosystems. I’m a generalist and I don’t enjoy full time developing. I was lucky in that I had a placement agency involved at the beginning and wasn’t doing it myself. Then there are process certs: Agile, Scrum, ITIL, Six Sigma, and you’ll pick up the knowledge but it’s good to codify.

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On 5/13/2019 at 9:01 PM, mom2scouts said:

...I know there are teachers who don't make much, but the ones in my city are well compensated.


In 2018, the average teacher salary overall in my *state* was $48,372. (The average for my city was just over $52,000). Cost of living is above average (but thankfully not excessively high, like CA). You would think my state would get a clue as to why the public schools are chronically under-staffed with teachers... 

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2 hours ago, gardenmom5 said:

 

there are "programs" that will walk you through them all, and give you something at the end, or you can do them individually, on your own.  you can put these on a resume.

Ok - someone PM'd me on this, so I got the info from DD, and thought I'd go ahead and post it here as some are interested.   

 

   

Ultimately you will be a developer or an operations/sysadmin. Knowing what I do now, I would have started with CompTIA certs, A+, Network+, Server+, Linux+, which are broad based. Microsoft and Cisco certs prove limiting, unless you plan to stay and specialize in their ecosystems. I’m a generalist and I don’t enjoy full time developing. I was lucky in that I had a placement agency involved at the beginning and wasn’t doing it myself. Then there are process certs: Agile, Scrum, ITIL, Six Sigma, and you’ll pick up the knowledge but it’s good to codify.

 

Thanks this will help us decide!

 

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1 hour ago, Lori D. said:


In 2018, the average teacher salary overall in my *state* was $48,372. (The average for my city was just over $52,000). Cost of living is above average (but thankfully not excessively high, like CA). You would think my state would get a clue as to why the public schools are chronically under-staffed with teachers... 

 

In most states, when teachers get a "raise" the biggest raise is front loaded, to attract new teachers.   Then that somehow makes the "average teacher pay" go up and everyone says, "SEE! They get plenty!"

But if you look at the average,  I don't make a whole lot more than that, with 20 year of experience.  It stinks.  And yet, every time there is a raise, it is front loaded for new teachers, and the rate of raise for veteran teachers is much lower. 

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I was quite surprised when I saw that my friend's area, relatively low COL area, paid their teachers over 50% more than my salary in a higher COL area.  

It is disheartening. 

But I am stuck.  I need to stay in NC or CA.  I am too old to go to a 3rd state and still get decent retirement benefits.

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On 5/13/2019 at 3:50 PM, seemesew said:

Nothing pays here unless you are oil or gas worker and doctors of course. Basically we'd need to move.

I am mostly looking for ideas so I can see if its possible to change careers without going to far back in pay but has more growth potential. Maybe another school in a different state is what we need to do too I'm not against that either.

 

Has your dh considered the oil and gas industry? My dh has a college degree but was in a sales job, which did not fit his personality at all. He completely changed careers and now works in oil and gas. He started out doing a more physical job but he has worked his way up over the years. In the beginning, he probably made around $80,000 and he has done a great job working his way up from there. The downside is that dh has to work away from home. But, he loves his job and he is so good at it, so we make it work. 

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Responding without reading first. 

Many jobs in outside sales, many industries. He has a degree in a field that involves talking to lots of people, that's a plus. He could get an inside support job to learn product and move outside. 

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