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Robin M

Book a Week 2019 - BW20: Happy Mother's Day

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Happy Sunday and welcome to week twenty in our 52 Books rambling roads reading adventure. Greetings to all our readers, welcome to all who are joining in for the first time and everyone following our progress. Visit  52 Books in 52 Weeks where you can find all the information on the annual, mini and perpetual challenges, as well as the central spot to share links to your book reviews. 

 

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A Rose for Mother

by

 Cleo M. Shoffstall

 

 Another Mother's Day is here,
Bringing joy and pleasures new,
On this special day, Mother dear,
I want to remember you.

I cannot give you costly gifts,
And I've told you this before,
No matter what I give to you,
You give back much, much more.

 I'm giving you a pure, sweet rose,
Gathered in the early morn,
This rose you planted in my heart,
The day that I was born.

 In kindly, loving thoughts of you,
And with the faith you still impart,
The rose I give to you today,
Is the love that's in my heart.

 Happy Mother's Day!

 

 

What are you reading?

Link to week nineteen

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Happy mom's day, my lovelies.  😘  

Patricia Brigg's Storm Cursed has arrived.  Yeah!  

Almost finished with my marathon reread of the Psy Changeling series and reading #15 Allegiance of Honor and I will be done until Wolf Rain comes out. The wrap up before the Trinity series.

"The Psy-Changeling world has undergone a staggering transformation and now stands at a crossroads. The Trinity Accord promises a new era of cooperation between disparate races and groups. It is a beacon of hope held together by many hands: Old enemies. New allies. Wary loners.

But a century of distrust and suspicion can’t be so easily forgotten and threatens to shatter Trinity from within at any moment. As rival members vie for dominance, chaos and evil gather in the shadows and a kidnapped woman’s cry for help washes up in San Francisco, while the Consortium turns its murderous gaze toward a child who is the embodiment of change, of love, of piercing hope: A child who is both Psy…and changeling.

To find the lost, protect the vulnerable—and save Trinity—no one can stand alone. This is a time of loyalty across divisions, of bonds woven into the heart and the soul, of heroes known and unknown standing back to back and holding the line. But is an allegiance of honor even possible with traitors lurking in their midst?"

But first, more garage cleaning and the fun of sorting through loads of book boxes.  Which will be keepers and which will be donated?  That is the question.  

 

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This week was mostly spent reading, though not quite finishing, William James' Psychology: Briefer Course. This was meant as a shorter, student-friendly version of his monumental Principles of Psychology (students called the latter "James," and the Briefer Course "Jimmy"), but included new materials on what he called "the stream of consciousness," which ended up being an important literary source for Joyce, Stein, etc. Lots of the chapters bear on topics important in dh's field, and now and then I read him chunks of "Jimmy" just to enjoy his professional reaction to Victorian speculation. "Hey, don't shout at me, I'm only reading it for the literary significance."

Only thing finished this week was some Roman theater: Plautus's play Amphitryo (195 BC). Cuckolded by Jove while away at the wars? Your slave impersonated by Mercury to keep you out of your own bedroom? What to do? Oh the hijinks!

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Happy mother's day!

My nephew's wedding yesterday was lovely; I'm glad my husband and I were able to attend. My sister hosted a wonderful brunch this morning, and we're dining with her and others this evening. Tomorrow we'll fly home.

Some bookish posts ~

A Journey Through Tolkien's Artwork at the Morgan Library & Museum

https://theportalist.com/tolkien-maker-of-middle-earth-morgan-library?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=The Portalist Weekly Thursday Newsletter 2019-05-09&utm_term=The Alt

7 Strange and Brilliant Holocaust Novels You’ve Probably Never Even Heard About

https://electricliterature.com/7-strange-and-brilliant-holocaust-novels-youve-probably-never-even-heard-about /

Regards,

Kareni

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Happy Mother's Day friends!

My people surprised me with a picture book of Scotland and Pride & Prejudice. We now have four copies of P&P I still love those people. (They also got me stuff from Lush so I might tease about them on here but I have no real complaints.)

Finished a book Sandy recommended a month ago.

The Last Victim by Karen Robards. I could nitpick all the things that were wrong with the book but I'm not going to because it was fast paced and interesting and there was a ghost but it was interesting. It's the love child of a suspense book and a romance and a magical realism book and a police procedural book from the 90's when authors didn't do good research on how police departments operate. @Kareni - Have you read any Karen Robards? I think you'd like her.

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Anyone here a Danielle Steel fan? This article about her writing process is going around and it's very interesting. I'd love to hear everyone else's opinion on her.

https://www.daniellesteel.net/writing/

I'm sure I read a few of her books when I was trapped on vacation with my parents and I failed to plan properly and ran out of books to read but I don't remember any specific books. They were the type of books that always seemed to be on the shelf of a lake cabin for the desperate reader. Actually I might be thinking Mary Higgins Clark! The two are interchangeable in my mind. 

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Happy Mother’s Day, BaWers! With my reread of Hamlet today, I reached fifty-two books. And Robin, I finished the Gamache challenge by reading Still Life; it was terrific. Here’s what I’ve read since my last post:

■ Crow Lake (Mary Lawson; 2002. Fiction.) RFS
■ Grass Kings, Vol. 3 (Matt Kindt; 2018. Graphic fiction.) LIB
■ Charmed Particles (Chrissy Kolaya; 2015. Fiction.) RFS
■ How to Be a Good Creature: A Memoir in Thirteen Animals (Sy Montgomery; 2018. Non-fiction.) LIB
■ Belonging: A German Reckons with History and Home (Nora Krug; 2018. Graphic non-fiction.) LIB
■ Paying for the Party: How College Maintains Inequality (Elizabeth Armstrong and Laura Hamilton; 2013. Non-fiction.) LIB
■ To Walk the Night (William Sloane; 1937. Fiction.) RFS
■ The Awakening (Kate Chopin; 1899. Fiction.) RFS
■ The Pigman (Paul Zindel; 1968. Fiction.) ATY
■ Gideon Falls, Vol. 2: Original Sins (Jeff Lemire; 2019. Graphic fiction.) OTH
■ The Test (Sylvain Neuvel ; 2018. Fiction.) ATY
■ Nobody’s Fool: The Life and Times of Schlitzie the Pinhead (Bill Griffith; 2019. Graphic non-fiction.) LIB
■ Hey, Kiddo (Jarrett J. Krosoczka; 2018. Graphic non-fiction.) RFS
■ Still Life (Louise Penny; 2005. Fiction.) ATY
■ The Uses of Enchantment (Heidi Julavits; 2006. Fiction.) RFS
■ Hamlet (William Shakespeare; 1602. Drama.) RFS

—————————————
ATY Acquired this year
LIB Borrowed from library
OTH Other
RFS Read from shelves

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3 hours ago, aggieamy said:

Anyone here a Danielle Steel fan? This article about her writing process is going around and it's very interesting. I'd love to hear everyone else's opinion on her.

https://www.daniellesteel.net/writing/

I'm sure I read a few of her books when I was trapped on vacation with my parents and I failed to plan properly and ran out of books to read but I don't remember any specific books. They were the type of books that always seemed to be on the shelf of a lake cabin for the desperate reader. Actually I might be thinking Mary Higgins Clark! The two are interchangeable in my mind. 

I used to love Danielle Steel back in my teens and twenties.  I remember buying several one summer and binge reading.  This was one I remember liking https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/59887.The_Promise.  I always pictured her heroines looking like ballerinas with a tragic past.  Glamorous, and San Fran was frequently a location.   Injured, secretive hero.  I used to really like Sidney Sheldon too, and I may have them intertwined.  I read the post and have to say I thought she was much older.  I probably read most of her books until I had kids but gave up because they are very similar.  

3 hours ago, aggieamy said:

 

The Last Victim by Karen Robards. I could nitpick all the things that were wrong with the book but I'm not going to because it was fast paced and interesting and there was a ghost but it was interesting. It's the love child of a suspense book and a romance and a magical realism book and a police procedural book from the 90's when authors didn't do good research on how police departments operate. @Kareni - Have you read any Karen Robards? I think you'd like her.

Glad you enjoyed it......I binge read the whole series!

This week I have been busy abandoning books......I gave up on both Gingerbread and Girl with a Dragon Tattoo.  I was avoiding reading because of them.  Still listening to The Expanse which is still entertaining me.  I am working on Thea Harrison’s Spellbinderhttps://www.goodreads.com/book/show/33980043-spellbinder and I have actually started the second Peter Zak book.

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This week I read As You Wish: Inconceivable Tales from the Making of the Princess Bride by Cary Elwes (Westley).  This book was laugh-out-loud funny.  

I am also pre-reading by first Mary Higgins Clark (Moonlight Becomes You).  I don't really think I like her style, but dd16 has requested some books that are less predictable than Agatha Christie.  I thought I would give this a try.

I'm also going to try some Grisham and Clancy.

This week I am also reading The Song of Roland.  I like epic poetry, but I sometimes have a hard time slogging through it.  When I started reading this the other day, I decided to experiment with what it would sound like if Lin-Manuel Miranda were reading it.  So imagine it in the rap storytelling style of Hamilton.  Brilliant!  I think he should write another Broadway hit.  :)

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Last week, for homeschooling, we ended up reading a nonfiction book about Machiavelli and we will probably read some of his works this week.  Also, we started The Necromancer by Michael Scott and this series includes Machiavelli as a character.  

I have been perusing The Eating Instinct by Virginia Sole-Smith and finding some of it interesting.

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14 hours ago, aggieamy said:

@Kareni - Have you read any Karen Robards? I think you'd like her.

I have indeed read many of her books though nothing in the past few years. I should investigate her more recent books. Thanks for mentioning The Last Victim, aggieamy.

Regards,

Kareni

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11 hours ago, Teaching3bears said:

Last week, for homeschooling, we ended up reading a nonfiction book about Machiavelli and we will probably read some of his works this week.  Also, we started The Necromancer by Michael Scott and this series includes Machiavelli as a character.  

I have been perusing The Eating Instinct by Virginia Sole-Smith and finding some of it interesting.

Last week I read all of the Machiavelli links that Robin provided and decided to go ahead and read or listen to The Prince.  Now you have me wondering if I should read the Michael Scott series which my daughter loved. She has always wanted me to read it and for some unknown reason I never got around to it.  I need a Machiavelli for my Bingo square.  So thank you 😉..........you probably have made my Dd very happy.

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I'll admit to being bored.  I'm still listening to Wild County by Anne Bishop.  I took a detour and have stepped out of my normal genre with The Expanse Series by James S. A. Corey finishing the first book, Leviathan Wakes.  I just started the second book, The Caliban's War.  Every once in a while I detour to space opera, which seems to help when I'm bored.  (The last time I read The Commonwealth Saga by Peter F. Hamilton.)  

For Leviathan Wakes:

"Humanity has colonized the solar system - Mars, the Moon, the Asteroid Belt and beyond - but the stars are still out of our reach.

Jim Holden is XO of an ice miner making runs from the rings of Saturn to the mining stations of the Belt. When he and his crew stumble upon a derelict ship, the Scopuli, they find themselves in possession of a secret they never wanted. A secret that someone is willing to kill for - and kill on a scale unfathomable to Jim and his crew. War is brewing in the system unless he can find out who left the ship and why.

Detective Miller is looking for a girl. One girl in a system of billions, but her parents have money and money talks. When the trail leads him to the Scopuli and rebel sympathizer Holden, he realizes that this girl may be the key to everything.

Holden and Miller must thread the needle between the Earth government, the Outer Planet revolutionaries, and secretive corporations - and the odds are against them. But out in the Belt, the rules are different, and one small ship can change the fate of the universe.

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15 minutes ago, melmichigan said:

I'll admit to being bored.  I'm still listening to Wild County by Anne Bishop.  I took a detour and have stepped out of my normal genre with The Expanse Series by James S. A. Corey finishing the first book, Leviathan Wakes.  I just started the second book, The Caliban's War.  Every once in a while I detour to space opera, which seems to help when I'm bored.  (The last time I read The Commonwealth Saga by Peter F. Hamilton.)  

For Leviathan Wakes:

"Humanity has colonized the solar system - Mars, the Moon, the Asteroid Belt and beyond - but the stars are still out of our reach.

Jim Holden is XO of an ice miner making runs from the rings of Saturn to the mining stations of the Belt. When he and his crew stumble upon a derelict ship, the Scopuli, they find themselves in possession of a secret they never wanted. A secret that someone is willing to kill for - and kill on a scale unfathomable to Jim and his crew. War is brewing in the system unless he can find out who left the ship and why.

Detective Miller is looking for a girl. One girl in a system of billions, but her parents have money and money talks. When the trail leads him to the Scopuli and rebel sympathizer Holden, he realizes that this girl may be the key to everything.

Holden and Miller must thread the needle between the Earth government, the Outer Planet revolutionaries, and secretive corporations - and the odds are against them. But out in the Belt, the rules are different, and one small ship can change the fate of the universe.

Glad you enjoyed Leviathon Wakes!😁 Thanks for the Commonwealth Saga idea.  I wasn’t sure what SF to read when I finished The Expanse and have randomly marked a few.  I just looked at Goodreads and saw there is a prequel called Misspent Youth with rather mixed ratings.  Did you read it?  My library does have it, just not on audio. So far all my SF reading adventures except for rather short novellas have been audio.  Pandora’s Star (book 1) and most if not all the rest appear to be on audio.

 

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1 hour ago, melmichigan said:

Every once in a while I detour to space opera, which seems to help when I'm bored. ...

I'll recommend SK Dunstall's Linesman series. The first book of three is Linesman 

 "The lines. No ship can traverse the void without them. Only linesmen can work with them. But only Ean Lambert hears their song. And everyone thinks he’s crazy…

Most slum kids never go far, certainly not becoming a level-ten linesman like Ean. Even if he’s part of a small, and unethical, cartel, and the other linesmen disdain his self-taught methods, he’s certified and working.

Then a mysterious alien ship is discovered at the edges of the galaxy. Each of the major galactic powers is desperate to be the first to uncover the ship’s secrets, but all they’ve learned is that it has the familiar lines of energy—and a defense system that, once triggered, annihilates everything in a 200 kilometer radius.

The vessel threatens any linesman who dares to approach it, except Ean. His unique talents may be the key to understanding this alarming new force—and reconfiguring the relationship between humans and the ships that serve them, forever."

Regards,

Kareni

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On 5/13/2019 at 9:46 PM, mumto2 said:

Glad you enjoyed Leviathon Wakes!😁 Thanks for the Commonwealth Saga idea.  I wasn’t sure what SF to read when I finished The Expanse and have randomly marked a few.  I just looked at Goodreads and saw there is a prequel called Misspent Youth with rather mixed ratings.  Did you read it?  My library does have it, just not on audio. So far all my SF reading adventures except for rather short novellas have been audio.  Pandora’s Star (book 1) and most if not all the rest appear to be on audio.

 

Did you plant that idea in my head?  If so thank you! 

 I did not read the prequel.  I started Pandora's Star on audible, and returned it.  The audible version didn't delineate the change in characters or scenes, and I was constantly confused.  Maybe they have updated the version, but I don't think the one I tried to listen to did the book justice.  I started the story over with the print and it went much, much better. (I tried listening to it after my fall, so take that will a grain of salt. 😉 )

@Kareni thanks for the recommendation.  I will file that away on Goodreads!

Edited by melmichigan
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I know many of you have read the Tana French series (Dublin Murder Squad). Should I start with book one? Is there a better place to start?

 

On 5/12/2019 at 7:49 PM, Junie said:

I am also pre-reading by first Mary Higgins Clark (Moonlight Becomes You).  I don't really think I like her style, but dd16 has requested some books that are less predictable than Agatha Christie.  I thought I would give this a try.

Your DD might like the Miss Silver books. Similar level of violence and smut to Agatha Christie (almost none) and time period but they have a different feel to them. Don't start with book one. Check out @tuesdayschild blog for her reviews. I agree with everything she says.

https://tuesdaysviews.blogspot.com/2018/08/miss-silver-mystery-books-patricia.html 

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25 minutes ago, aggieamy said:

I know many of you have read the Tana French series (Dublin Murder Squad). Should I start with book one? Is there a better place to start?

Definitely book 1, even though one of the latter ones is my favorite. They subtly build on each other.

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Howdy!  I finished book 11 of The Mahabharata.  I don't know why I thought there were 10 books - it's actually 18 - but the latter ones are shorter.  Still a ways to go before I am through.  I hope I'm done with the blood & guts though.

With my kids [audiobooks], we finished The Long Winter and are mostly done with Little Town on the Prairie.  The Spy School read-aloud is still where it was before our UAE trip.

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Hi everyone! Happy belated Mother's Day!

I've stopped and started several books since last week. I seem to find so many books that sound really good but when I get them home and start reading, well, I seem to lose interest. I did finish a middle grade nove lThe Not So Boring Letters of Private Nobody  by Matthew Landis. This was cute and my 12yo might like it - I've been trying to find more books for her - she seems to be on a one genre kick right now so I'm not sure if she'll want to pick this up or not.

I also read about half of The Mother-In-Law  by Sally Hepworth. It's good but I think I see where it is heading and it just seems so sad - the mil and the dil just have zero understanding of each other and bad things happen. 

A story that I AM excited about is Dread Nation by Justina Harper. I'm listening on Audible and am really enjoying it. The Civil War and zombies - who knew? 🙂

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9 hours ago, Mothersweets said:

Hi everyone! Happy belated Mother's Day!

I've stopped and started several books since last week. I seem to find so many books that sound really good but when I get them home and start reading, well, I seem to lose interest. I did finish a middle grade nove lThe Not So Boring Letters of Private Nobody  by Matthew Landis. This was cute and my 12yo might like it - I've been trying to find more books for her - she seems to be on a one genre kick right now so I'm not sure if she'll want to pick this up or not.

I also read about half of The Mother-In-Law  by Sally Hepworth. It's good but I think I see where it is heading and it just seems so sad - the mil and the dil just have zero understanding of each other and bad things happen. 

A story that I AM excited about is Dread Nation by Justina Harper. I'm listening on Audible and am really enjoying it. The Civil War and zombies - who knew? 🙂

Are you forgetting Abe Lincoln was a Vampire Hunter? 😜 I actually really enjoyed that book.😂. So......I just went looking for Dread Nation and managed to find it.  My virtual stack is growing!

I finished one of novellas in The Expanse series called Strange  Dogs today and your Zombie post cracked me up.....my book was about Zombies in outer space.  They are everywhere!

 

 

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2 hours ago, mumto2 said:

Are you forgetting Abe Lincoln was a Vampire Hunter? 😜 I actually really enjoyed that book.😂. So......I just went looking for Dread Nation and managed to find it.  My virtual stack is growing!

I finished one of novellas in The Expanse series called Strange  Dogs today and your Zombie post cracked me up.....my book was about Zombies in outer space.  They are everywhere!

 

 

How did I forget that?!   Civil War zombies and zombies in outer space - they must be shuffling around our subconscious  braaaaiiiiinnnnnsssss

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My book group meets tomorrow. I wasn't able to get a copy of our book before my trip, so I read the entire book yesterday and today. I found it an easy read, but it was a sad story that made me cry. Sadder still when one realizes that Sri Lanka is still plagued with violence.

Island of a Thousand Mirrors: A Novel  by Nayomi Munaweera

"Before violence tore apart the tapestry of Sri Lanka and turned its pristine beaches red, there were two families. Yasodhara tells the story of her own Sinhala family, rich in love, with everything they could ask for. As a child in idyllic Colombo, Yasodhara's and her siblings' lives are shaped by social hierarchies, their parents' ambitions, teenage love and, subtly, the differences between Tamil and Sinhala people; but the peace is shattered by the tragedies of war. Yasodhara's family escapes to Los Angeles. But Yasodhara's life has already become intertwined with a young Tamil girl's…

Saraswathie is living in the active war zone of Sri Lanka, and hopes to become a teacher. But her dreams for the future are abruptly stamped out when she is arrested by a group of Sinhala soldiers and pulled into the very heart of the conflict that she has tried so hard to avoid – a conflict that, eventually, will connect her and Yasodhara in unexpected ways. "

Regards,

Kareni

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@Kareni have fun at you book club. This month’s choice looks interesting.

I just had an enjoyable time reading The Alchemist the first book inMichael Scott’s Nicholas Flamel series.  My kids were read these on their own and I didn’t insert myself into the fight over the library book time limits.  If I had known how fun these books were I might have bought them!  They were so popular..... So next up in this series The Magician which will give me my Machiavelli Bingo square.  https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2402971.The_Magician. I plan to read the whole series over the next month or so......depending on Overdrive availability.  Thank you @Teaching3bears for the idea!

I am also reading Zero Day which @Robin M recently suggested for my Z requirements.  So far I like it, rather like a Lee Child book.  https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/11007587-zero-day?ac=1&from_search=true

 

 

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I recently read with pleasure Shards of Honor (Vorkosigan Saga)  by Lois McMaster Bujold. I look forward to reading more in the series.

"When Cordelia Naismith and her survey crew are attacked by a renegade group from Barrayar, she is taken prisoner by Aral Vorkosigan, commander of the Barrayan ship that has been taken over by an ambitious and ruthless crew member. Aral and Cordelia survive countless mishaps while their mutual admiration and even stronger feelings emerge. A science fiction romance by a Hugo and Nebula Award winning master. "

 **

I also read and enjoyed the paranormal mystery The Wolf at the Door (Big Bad Wolf Book 1)  by Charlie Adhara. (Adult content),

"A former FBI agent is partnered with the enemy in this suspenseful male/male shifter romance from debut author Charlie Adhara

Hunting for big bad wolves was never part of Agent Cooper Dayton’s plan, but a werewolf attack lands him in the carefully guarded Bureau of Special Investigations. A new case comes with a new partner: ruggedly sexy werewolf Oliver Park.

Park is an agent of The Trust, a werewolf oversight organization working to ease escalating tensions with the BSI. But as far as Cooper’s concerned, it’s failing. As they investigate a series of mysterious deaths unlike anything they’ve seen, every bone in Cooper’s body is suspicious of his new partner—even when Park proves himself as competent as he is utterly captivating.

When more people vanish, pressure to solve the case skyrockets. And though he’d resolved to keep things professional, Cooper’s friction with Park soon erupts…into a physical need that can’t be contained or controlled. But with a body count that’s rising by the day, werewolves and humans are in equal danger. If Cooper and Park don’t catch the killer soon, one—or both—of them could be the next to go. "

Regards,

Kareni

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While running errands via bus today, I read an art project book. It was a light and quick read, but I intend to do one of the projects.

 
 "Entertaining, clever, witty -- Tattoo a Banana is an innovative approach to creativity by internationally recognized artist Phil Hansen. This fun and captivating guide will have you creating art with anything at hand - like a piece of toast, your own fingerprints, or a stack of marshmallows - showing how to develop everyday creativity with offbeat techniques. 

Whether you want to jumpstart, rediscover or further your creative pursuits, this book will help you build your creative muscles by experimenting with the unexpected. Once you tattoo a banana, print on marshmallows, or mold a Mona Lisa sugar cookie, you'll definitely be curious about what else is possible!"

Regards,

Kareni

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On 5/12/2019 at 2:00 PM, aggieamy said:

Anyone here a Danielle Steel fan? This article about her writing process is going around and it's very interesting. I'd love to hear everyone else's opinion on her.

https://www.daniellesteel.net/writing/

I'm sure I read a few of her books when I was trapped on vacation with my parents and I failed to plan properly and ran out of books to read but I don't remember any specific books. They were the type of books that always seemed to be on the shelf of a lake cabin for the desperate reader. Actually I might be thinking Mary Higgins Clark! The two are interchangeable in my mind. 

Wow, I didn't know she had nine kids and still managed to fit in all that writing time.   Back in the late 70's, early 80's I read a few of her books along with Barbara Cartland.  Enjoyed them then, now not so much so I'd have to agree with you on the desperate reader front.   Clark did remind me quite a bit of their styles which is why I probably don't like her now either.  

 

 

On 5/12/2019 at 4:11 PM, Melissa M said:

Happy Mother’s Day, BaWers! With my reread of Hamlet today, I reached fifty-two books. And Robin, I finished the Gamache challenge by reading Still Life; it was terrific. Here’s what I’ve read since my last post:

■ Crow Lake (Mary Lawson; 2002. Fiction.) RFS
■ Grass Kings, Vol. 3 (Matt Kindt; 2018. Graphic fiction.) LIB
■ Charmed Particles (Chrissy Kolaya; 2015. Fiction.) RFS
■ How to Be a Good Creature: A Memoir in Thirteen Animals (Sy Montgomery; 2018. Non-fiction.) LIB
■ Belonging: A German Reckons with History and Home (Nora Krug; 2018. Graphic non-fiction.) LIB
■ Paying for the Party: How College Maintains Inequality (Elizabeth Armstrong and Laura Hamilton; 2013. Non-fiction.) LIB
■ To Walk the Night (William Sloane; 1937. Fiction.) RFS
■ The Awakening (Kate Chopin; 1899. Fiction.) RFS
■ The Pigman (Paul Zindel; 1968. Fiction.) ATY
■ Gideon Falls, Vol. 2: Original Sins (Jeff Lemire; 2019. Graphic fiction.) OTH
■ The Test (Sylvain Neuvel ; 2018. Fiction.) ATY
■ Nobody’s Fool: The Life and Times of Schlitzie the Pinhead (Bill Griffith; 2019. Graphic non-fiction.) LIB
■ Hey, Kiddo (Jarrett J. Krosoczka; 2018. Graphic non-fiction.) RFS
■ Still Life (Louise Penny; 2005. Fiction.) ATY
■ The Uses of Enchantment (Heidi Julavits; 2006. Fiction.) RFS
■ Hamlet (William Shakespeare; 1602. Drama.) RFS

—————————————
ATY Acquired this year
LIB Borrowed from library
OTH Other
RFS Read from shelves

Yeah for 52!  I knew you'd reach it with all the reading you do.  So glad you enjoyed Still Life. 

On 5/13/2019 at 6:45 AM, mumto2 said:

Last week I read all of the Machiavelli links that Robin provided and decided to go ahead and read or listen to The Prince.  Now you have me wondering if I should read the Michael Scott series which my daughter loved. She has always wanted me to read it and for some unknown reason I never got around to it.  I need a Machiavelli for my Bingo square.  So thank you 😉..........you probably have made my Dd very happy.

 

On 5/16/2019 at 11:58 AM, mumto2 said:

@Kareni have fun at you book club. This month’s choice looks interesting.

I just had an enjoyable time reading The Alchemist the first book inMichael Scott’s Nicholas Flamel series.  My kids were read these on their own and I didn’t insert myself into the fight over the library book time limits.  If I had known how fun these books were I might have bought them!  They were so popular..... So next up in this series The Magician which will give me my Machiavelli Bingo square.  https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2402971.The_Magician. I plan to read the whole series over the next month or so......depending on Overdrive availability.  Thank you @Teaching3bears for the idea!

I am also reading Zero Day which @Robin M recently suggested for my Z requirements.  So far I like it, rather like a Lee Child book.  https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/11007587-zero-day?ac=1&from_search=true

Yes, I thoroughly enjoyed  and still am enjoying Michael Scott's Nicholas Flamel's series.  I've read the first four and haven't read The Warlock yet.  Glad you are enjoying them as well as Zero Day.  I saw  Hank Phillipi Ryan interview David Baldacci as well as Jacqueline Winspear interview Lee Child at Bouchercon several years ago which is what sold me on their books. 

Haven't been able to get into Storm Cursed.   Not in the mood for something new.   So decided to continue on with Silver Silence and Ocean Light which make a lot more sense now that I've read the series in order. Had forgotten so much. 

We've been spending every spare minute cleaning out the garage. Scheduled annual dump day today so we heaved all the stuff into the side yard over the past week and then hauled it all out to the street yesterday.  Clean, clean, clean. Feels so much better.  Still have lots of book boxes to go through and sort.  

 

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31 minutes ago, Robin M said:

Yes, I thoroughly enjoyed  and still am enjoying Michael Scott's Nicholas Flamel's series.  I've read the first four and haven't read The Warlock yet.  Glad you are enjoying them as well as Zero Day.  I saw  Hank Phillipi Ryan interview David Baldacci as well as Jacqueline Winspear interview Lee Child at Bouchercon several years ago which is what sold me on their books. 

Haven't been able to get into Storm Cursed.   Not in the mood for something new.   So decided to continue on with Silver Silence and Ocean Light which make a lot more sense now that I've read the series in order. Had forgotten so much. 

We've been spending every spare minute cleaning out the garage. Scheduled annual dump day today so we heaved all the stuff into the side yard over the past week and then hauled it all out to the street yesterday.  Clean, clean, clean. Feels so much better.  Still have lots of book boxes to go through and sort.  

 

Glad you made progress with the great garage clean out!  Sounds like my kind of a book festival.  😉I finished Zero Day and definitely plan to read more of his Puller books.

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On 5/17/2019 at 6:33 PM, Kareni said:

While running errands via bus today, I read an art project book. It was a light and quick read, but I intend to do one of the projects.

 
 "Entertaining, clever, witty -- Tattoo a Banana is an innovative approach to creativity by internationally recognized artist Phil Hansen. This fun and captivating guide will have you creating art with anything at hand - like a piece of toast, your own fingerprints, or a stack of marshmallows - showing how to develop everyday creativity with offbeat techniques. 

Whether you want to jumpstart, rediscover or further your creative pursuits, this book will help you build your creative muscles by experimenting with the unexpected. Once you tattoo a banana, print on marshmallows, or mold a Mona Lisa sugar cookie, you'll definitely be curious about what else is possible!"

Regards,

Kareni

Neat book! I'll definitely look for it at my library - thanks for posting about it!

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