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15 hours ago, Sue in St Pete said:

Kareni, I will be forever grateful to you for sharing your school profile and letter of recommendation with me.  🌹 I will be forever grateful to Lori D, Laura in CA, and Janice in NJ for taking the time to critique ds's high school transcript.

Thank you so much for the kind words, Sue. Many others had helped me, so it was rewarding to help others when I could.

Wishing your son well as he begins his job next month. And all the best to you!

Regards,

Kareni

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On 5/5/2019 at 9:58 AM, Kareni said:

 She has now been living in South Korea for almost six years. 

Have you been able to visit her?

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2 hours ago, Sue in St Pete said:

Have you been able to visit her?

We have. My husband and I flew out and spent a week with her during her first year. It was impressive to see her making her way comfortably in a different culture and language!  A couple of years later she completely floored my husband when she sent him a plane ticket to come visit her in Seoul for ten days; it was a very surprising Fathers' Day gift.

Regards,

Kareni

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On 5/5/2019 at 8:57 AM, Kareni said:

 

-- What led you to homeschool?

-- How was your child homeschooled in the high school years? (Did you use WTM as a guide? Did your child take out of the home, online classes, or college classes?)

-- What did your child do after graduating? What is your child doing now?I

1.  At the beginning of 2nd grade,  DS was diagnosed gifted with maths/handwriting/reading SLDs.  We opted to keep him at private school where he worked with a private reading tutor.  We started homeschooling full time in 7th grade because the middle school was a bad fit and didn’t allow IEP, 504, or the most basic accommodations. He worked with a private, OG/IEW certified teacher for writing in 7th and 8th grades.  I taught all of his math and am only now recovering a year after graduation.  

2.  WTM was a guide.  DS took informal logic and kept a modified history notebook from grades 7-12.  DS typed everything except math and took outside classes for biology, informal logic, Elegant Essay, chemistry, physics with algebra, and early American lit.   DS took two years of drafting online with Murray Technical Ed  of Florida.

3.  Son attends a small state uni 53 miles away and just completed his fresher year.  During that time, he joined a fraternity and is a member of the SGA.  My dyslexic/dysgraphic is pursuing a history degree on a minor academic scholarship.  DH and I are standing back and holding our breath.  So far, DS is maintaining a 3.7 gpa, but the USAF or USN is always an option.  DS hopes to pursue a commission in the USAF or USN upon graduation.  

My youngest child is a rising 6th grader and has been homeschooled from the beginning.  

ETA:  SWB’s comments about colleges at the end of Rethinking School prompted me to consider the tiny state school that DS currently attends.

Edited by Heathermomster
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It's been fascinating to read the various paths our graduates have taken both pre- and post-graduation. Thanks to those who have shared. I hope to read many more stories.

Regards,

Kareni

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1 hour ago, Heathermomster said:

ETA:  SWB’s comments about colleges at the end of Rethinking School prompted me to consider the tiny state school that DS currently attends.

I browsed Rethinking School but did not read it closely. Can you elaborate on those comments, Heathermomster?

Regards,

Kareni

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30 minutes ago, Kareni said:

I browsed Rethinking School but did not read it closely. Can you elaborate on those comments, Heathermomster?

Regards,

Kareni

Go back and read the "Postscript About College".

SWB discussed being debt free after receiving her Bachelor's degree and stressed that among her circle of academics, no one was interested in where she attended school for undergraduate work.  

My bright DS has dyscalculia and required a program with minimal math requirements.  Every school that we looked at required pre-cal or college algebra at a minimum.  His maths disability is pretty bad, so we selected a school with minimal math requirements.  As it turns out,  DS tested into Finite Math, worked his tail off, and earned an A.  For the sciences, he took Biology/lab and Earth Science/lab and is done with gen ed science. 

I would prefer that DS go to a bigger school, but we don't qualify for financial aid and rely solely on academic scholarship.  Given his SLDs, we compromised and placed him in a school that we can afford and has a reasonable DSS office.  DS understands that he may very well be pursuing graduate work in order to find employment if he doesn't pursue a military commission.  In that time, we expect that he will enter a graduate study program at a more prominent university.  As it stands, he loves his uni and has adapted well.  It's a struggle when two engineers marry and their firstborn is a humanities kid.  Anyhoo...

In the SWB's book, she mentions parental fear about getting their child getting into a good college when a child is 8 or 14 years old and behind.  That has been my lived experience ever since DS with diagnosed with multiple SLDs.  SWB's writing persuaded me to look at DS and try what was best for him.   The kid loves history, and I can say with absolute certainty that the WTM history notebook has prepared him for research and using multiple resources.

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1 hour ago, Heathermomster said:

Go back and read the "Postscript About College".

SWB discussed being debt free after receiving her Bachelor's degree and stressed that among her circle of academics, no one was interested in where she attended school for undergraduate work.  ...

Thanks for elaborating, Heathermomster; I had forgotten that part of the book.  

1 hour ago, Heathermomster said:

...he loves his uni and has adapted well.

It's great to hear that your son is thriving in his new setting.

1 hour ago, Heathermomster said:

It's a struggle when two engineers marry and their firstborn is a humanities kid.  Anyhoo...

Two PhD chemists here with a daughter who majored in Latin; I hear you!

Regards,

Kareni

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On 5/8/2019 at 8:15 AM, Junie said:

I have two homeschool graduates and one public school graduate.

 What led you to homeschool?

My youngest had extreme language delay - basically nonverbal until age four. He was still not talking by the start of kindergarten. The local PS put my child in special ed immediately. It was a disaster after even the first week. We pulled him out of school and decided to homeschool until his speech issues were better. My middle son was only 11 months older, and they were very close. He was in first grade when he wanted to come home too. We had no idea that we would keep going until they graduated! Especially since my oldest tried homeschooling for one year and hated it.

-- How was your child homeschooled in the high school years? (Did you use WTM as a guide? Did your child take out of the home, online classes, or college classes?)

We were very eclectic in our curriculum, except we used Teaching Textbooks all the way through. They did an outside co-op with paid classes, and for grade 12 they did dual enrollment.

 

-- What did your child do after graduating? What is your child doing now?

My oldest graduated from PS, attended trade school, and is now making good money as a certified welding inspector. His personal life, however, has been a struggle. A divorce and a failed engagement. He is a wonderful single father, and I hope he finds happiness again.

My second son just graduated with a Bachelors in Engineering. It took him five years, but he did it! He is working now as a project manager, a job he had started about six months ago. Truthfully, college was a struggle for him. He was more worried about his social life than his grades, so he had to catch up on his GPA.

My youngest - the one with the speech problems - is now in college and majoring in History. He loves college, but he still is not sure what his life’s occupation will be. He is the only one left at home.

As for me, my life really changed once we were done homeschooling four years ago. I babysit my grandchild a lot and have a small online business. I enjoy having more free time to pursue my interests now. 

I have enjoyed reading about the other high school graduates!

 

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The quote in the previous post attributed to me is not mine.  I don't know whose it is.  I guess the website is just being quirky again. 😉

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On 5/5/2019 at 9:57 AM, Kareni said:

When I was homeschooling, I found it interesting (and often reassuring) to hear what homeschoolers were doing post-graduation. It was a diverse group. Some entered the workforce, apprenticed or learned a trade, enlisted in the military, went on a mission, married and began a family, attended college, or ....

I would be delighted if you were to share about your homeschool graduate.

Please answer any or all of the following questions. (If you have multiple graduates, you might wish to make a separate post for each child.)

-- What led you to homeschool?

-- How was your child homeschooled in the high school years? (Did you use WTM as a guide? Did your child take out of the home, online classes, or college classes?)

-- What did your child do after graduating? What is your child doing now?


I know that some of our adult children have died doing military service, from illness or accident, or from other causes. If you are willing, please remember them here.

Regards,
Kareni

 

What led us to homeschool?

We lived in a rough, urban neighborhood with abysmal schools. A friend was enthusiastic about homeschooling and I was intrigued by what she had to say. Read and researched a bunch and tried it out thinking, "How could anyone mess up kindergarten?" Had a blast. Fell in love. The rest is history.

Re homeschool in the high school years:

My dd homeschooled all the way through. For high school I taught some subjects, while others were farmed out to her father, tutors, co-op classes, and community college. We did lean heavily on WTM recommendations but didn't follow every jot and tittle.

Re life after graduation:

My ds chose to attend a private school for high school, and he has thrived there from the first. His GPA is high, as are his AP and college entrance test scores. He is also an Eagle Scout. Homeschool prepared him well.

My dd is currently a student at Purdue, where she is thriving and due to graduate this December with a high GPA. She has no regrets about choosing to homeschool all the way through high school.

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10 hours ago, Junie said:

The quote in the previous post attributed to me is not mine.  I don't know whose it is.  I guess the website is just being quirky again. 😉

That is odd. My guess is that @Sweets may have used your post to copy the questions but inadvertently left the attribution.

Regards,

Kareni

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2 hours ago, Kareni said:

That is odd. My guess is that @Sweets may have used your post to copy the questions but inadvertently left the attribution.

Regards,

Kareni

No, she wrote under the quote box.  I think she might have quoted a post that was later deleted and the forum got mixed up.  I looked for the post, but couldn't find it.  But, I remember reading it a few days ago.

Curiouser and curiouser.

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2 hours ago, Junie said:

Curiouser and curiouser.

Definitely!

Regards,

Kareni

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Hello, I am Sweets and I apologize for the quote from Junior. I had used her post to answer the questions and totally messed up on the posting I guess. Sorry for the confusion. 

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We decided to hs when oldest DS was in 7th grade and began when he was entering 8th grade. We were not necessarily unhappy with our local ps, but were tired of feeling like the school schedule ruled our lives and wanted more time with our kids before they grew up and left the nest. Best decision we ever made! Hs'ing really made fostering a close relationship easier and more natural than trying to "squeeze it in" around the ps schedule.

High school was accomplished with almost all courses at home. DS took 1 CC course senior year, and did a couple online at your own pace courses (no live instructor) and the rest was either on his own or with me. DS is pretty advanced academically and achieved things he never would have had time for if he'd been tied to the ps schedule for 4 years (for example, teaching himself several programming languages in his spare time and having time to tackle AoPS). While I adore WTM and have learned so much from it and gained confidence to do high school with rigor on my own with it as a guide, its humanities heavy standards are just not what my kids are looking for in an education. So we skipped Latin 😛 did a bit of logic and focused more on math and science and electives than on the classics. I did/do appreciate the WTM method of studying history and literature together, just with less emphasis than WTM gives it.

I've only graduated one so far. Right now DS just finished his freshman year at Purdue studying CS while working (part time during the school year and full time during the summer) for a local engineering firm doing programming. He kept a 4.0 and was invited to join the CS Honors program. He lived at home and commuted freshman year but signed a lease for an apt with friends for sophomore year. Aside from schoolwork, he joined a group of ag students which are designing an automated ATV that farmers can use to identify and eliminate weeds in their fields (he worked on the camera and programming aspects) and he auditioned and was invited to join a gospel singing group as part of the Purdue Musical Organization for next year.

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-- What led you to homeschool?

My oldest dd will be 27 this month. She homeschooled her junior and senior years in high school. I was already homeschooling my two younger children and she hated the brick and mortar scchooll

-- How was your child homeschooled in the high school years? (Did you use WTM as a guide? Did your child take out of the home, online classes, or college classes?)

Unfortunately, homeschooling high school terrified me. Instead, I used an accredited online high school. She took the minimum number of classes to graduate with a diploma.

-- What did your child do after graduating? What is your child doing now?

She was working nearly full time before she graduated as a server in a restaurant. She continued with that job after she graduated. After doing that for a few years, she was approached by the owner of a business who lured her away from the restaurant to work for his company. She's been with them for 5 years now. It's hard to explain the nature of her work. It's incredibly stressful and she often talks about moving on to something else. However, she receives a high salary and knows she cannot go anywhere else for that amount of money unless she has a higher education. Right now she's just hanging in there. She doesn't want to go to college. Her home life is happy so she considers her job to be just a paycheck. She doesn't allow it to interfere with her home life. I think her future plans are to marry and be a SAHM. I know her boyfriend wants her to have the opportunity to be a SAHM. He's currently in school and I think they are waiting to get married when he graduates and gets a good paying job. I pray that happens within the next couple of years. She really wants to have a baby by the age of 30. 

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-- What led you to homeschool?

I withdrew my ds from Kindergarten and homeschooled him until 4th grade when he spent 11 days in public school, then returned home and homeschooled until he graduated. School was not a good fit for him in Kindergarten. We didn't know it at the time but he has Aspergers so the classroom was just too much for him. The 11 days in 4th grade were a disaster. I was selfish putting him back in school and realized that fairly quickly and pulled him out again.

-- How was your child homeschooled in the high school years? (Did you use WTM as a guide? Did your child take out of the home, online classes, or college classes?)

Like my older dd, he used an accredited online high school. He took the minimum number of  classes to graduate but I made sure they included the core set of classes required by Georgia colleges.

-- What did your child do after graduating? What is your child doing now?

After graduating, he went straight into a 4-year college and went part-time for one year. He hated it. He left school and got a stocking job in a grocery store. He worked there 13 months and hated it. He quit and stayed home for almost a year before deciding he needed to do something productive with his life. He is currently attending a technical school working for an associate's degree to become a Network Specialist.

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This is about my dd21. She didn't graduate homeschool but thought I'd share her story anyway.

-- What led you to homeschool?

I was already homeschooling my ds so I just added dd into our day. However, between Kindergarten and 5th grades, she tried attending school for various lengths of time. She seemed to prefer the brick and mortar way but there was always a reason she decided to come back home. I knew we could provide a better education for her but she had other ideas.

-- How was your child homeschooled in the high school years? (Did you use WTM as a guide? Did your child take out of the home, online classes, or college classes?)

She chose not to homeschool high school. I was terribly disappointed that she wanted to go to a B&M high school. Fortunately she did extremely well so I know her years at home really helped her.

-- What did your child do after graduating? What is your child doing now?

She went straight into a 4-year university and is currently in her junior year. She is a statistics major. 

 

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1 hour ago, Sweets said:

Hello, I am Sweets and I apologize for the quote from Junie. I had used her post to answer the questions and totally messed up on the posting I guess. Sorry for the confusion. 

No problem.  Welcome to the board!  :)  Sometimes it takes awhile to figure out how a place works.

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On 5/5/2019 at 9:57 AM, Kareni said:

 

-- What led you to homeschool?  I could write a book about what a disaster public school was for my kids and how thankful we all are that we began homeschooling when they were in elementary school.

-- How was your child homeschooled in the high school years? (Did you use WTM as a guide? Did your child take out of the home, online classes, or college classes?) I didn't follow WTM because I didn't feel that it focused enough in my kids' areas of interest - namely math and science.  They didn't take any college classes or participate in any co-ops.  Most of their classes were home-brewed with one or two online classes thrown into the mix each year.  My kids each had a favorite online class: My middle son, in addition to math and computers, loves to write and really loved the WTM online rhetoric classes with Thomas Hummel.  My other two enjoyed their online AP Chemistry class with Mr. M. at ChemAdvantage.

-- What did your child do after graduating? What is your child doing now? My oldest son is graduating in a few weeks with a bachelor of science in math and computer science.  He accepted a job offer last summer, so that definitely took a lot of the pressure off heading into his senior year. He has just recently signed a lease on his first apartment.  (He will be rooming with one of his best friends from college who will also be working at the same company.)   While his school doesn't have any type of honors designations on the diplomas, last time we were visiting him, he took us down the hallway where his picture will be hung after graduation for being named an Academic All-American.  He credits his success in college to me homeschooling him, which as you can imagine, makes me very happy.

My middle child is in the midst of finals in his second year of college.  He is at a liberal arts school known for its academic intensity, and has found that the college lives up to its reputation.  He is majoring in math and computer science and enjoying the small classroom discussions and writing intensive classes.  He loves his school, the professors, and his classmates.  He was selected to be a junior advisor for next year and has been participating in training sessions all semester.  He has had a rough year outside of the classroom: he suffered an injury in the fall and has been taking way too much Advil for my liking since to deal with the pain. He is scheduled for surgery on both hips when he gets home in a couple of weeks and had to rescind his summer internship and will be "stuck" at home in physical therapy instead. 

My youngest is graduating from our homeschool this month and is heading off to college in the fall.  I was really hoping that she would accept the offer and go to the same college that my middle child is at.  But, despite my middle child's hard campaigning, she chose another college.  While both of them will be 9+ hours from home, the good news is that they will only be about 45 minutes from each other, making drop offs and pick-ups a little easier.  She is chomping at the bit to fly the coop and begin her college career.

Homeschooling was one of the best decisions we have ever made for our kids.

 

 

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On 5/5/2019 at 9:57 AM, Kareni said:

When I was homeschooling, I found it interesting (and often reassuring) to hear what homeschoolers were doing post-graduation. It was a diverse group. Some entered the workforce, apprenticed or learned a trade, enlisted in the military, went on a mission, married and began a family, attended college, or ....

I would be delighted if you were to share about your homeschool graduate.

Please answer any or all of the following questions. (If you have multiple graduates, you might wish to make a separate post for each child.)

-- What led you to homeschool?

-- How was your child homeschooled in the high school years? (Did you use WTM as a guide? Did your child take out of the home, online classes, or college classes?)

-- What did your child do after graduating? What is your child doing now?


I know that some of our adult children have died doing military service, from illness or accident, or from other causes. If you are willing, please remember them here.

Regards,
Kareni

I haven't posted on the chat forum for yrs, probably not since 2008, but I followed your link here and will happily share.

-- What led you to homeschool? We started homeschooling in 1994 completely by accident without knowing anything about it. Our oldest was not quite ready for K, so we decided to hold him back a yr. In Sept we basically changed our minds, and I contacated the local superintendent's office to ask if I could teach him at home since even though not licensed in that state I had degree in elementary ed. That superintendent's office introduced me to homeschooling, and we have never looked back.

--How was your child homeschooled in the high school years? (Did you use WTM as a guide? Did your child take out of the home, online classes, or college classes? Our kids have done the majority of their courses at home with me. We design courses around their interests and don't attempt to replicate ps at home. All of them have had unique high school course sequences that fit them individually. There has been the odd online course and a few dual enrollment courses interspersed depending on the student.

--What did your child do after graduating? What is your child doing now? We have graduated 5 kids from our homeschool. Number 6 wil be a sr next yr.

  1. Our oldest is a chemical engineer, has been married for 9 yrs, and is a father of 4.
  2. Number 2 is autistic and is only semi-independent. He currently lives at home and works at Goodwill full-time.
  3. Number 3 attended an Allied Health program and is an occupational therapy assistant and mother of 2.
  4. Number 4 majored in physics and math and is now a physics grad student. He just got married this weekend. 🙂
  5. Number 5 is a rising college Jr majoring in Russian and French. She thinks her current goal is to pursue a career as a special collections librarian.
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What led you to homeschool?  We couldn't afford private school tuition. We committed to 3 years of homeschooling starting in 1st grade, then we'd reevaluate. After 3 years we realized that homeschooling fit our lifestyle, committed to three more, then from there decided to go all the way through high school. In early elementary ds' grade level material spanned several grades. He was a delayed reader, but understand content and math quite readily. Homeschooling allowed him to stay on pace with subjects while remediating his reading. 

How was your child homeschooled in the high school years? (Did you use WTM as a guide? Did your child take out of the home, online classes, or college classes?) high school was a mix of classical with a world focus, student led, and chaos. Budget was still an issue, so ds never took outside classes. My ex-dh and I separated when ds was 15, the end of what was supposed to be freshman year. I started college that fall and did school online the first year so we could continue homeschooling. We realized once I started commuting to school (30 minutes each way) that homeschooling wasn't working and graduated ds a year early. 

We pieced together materials, I'd loved putting together courses. Math was/is my nemesis and that's one reason we graduated him early, to get better math instruction. We studied some subjects together, like Japanese and literature. He self-studied computer science and a few other tech courses. He basically unschooled those credits. I arranged his transcript by subject and pulled a few courses from 8th grade that were high school worthy. 

My inspirations for high school came very much from the people on this board. I used WTM and Latin-Centered Curriculum as models yet tweaked them for ds' interests and our situation. 

What did your child do after graduating? What is your child doing now? Ds will be 22 this fall (wow, he was 10 when I started posting on here). He's a senior in college. Ironically, a math major who does computer programming. He's been doing programming work with one of the professors for the last two summers. He is also a bit frustrated with school. The department is changing and he's frankly ready to be done. 

Homeschooling was good in that he found out that learning is not just a classroom activity. The bad part is that he hates 50 minute classes and feels like that is learning in bite sized pieces. He's toying with the idea of taking a year off to work and then finish his degree at another school. He's been considering this most of the year and then 3 weeks ago his dad (my ex-dh) died. It was sudden, yet not completely unexpected. They did not have a good relationship, Ex-dh never realized that ds grew up. I am so proud of the man ds has become. He was a rock for me after my separation, then for my mom and I as my dad fell ill shortly after my separation and died in 2015. Ds and I have a strong relationship and I believe homeschooling was a big part of that. 

Our homeschooling journey didn't always go as planned. We plowed through, ds enjoyed the flexibility and being able to focus on what he wanted. 

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-- What led you to homeschool?

(A) I attended a college that enrolled students from all over the world.  I absorbed that there is no such thing as a "normal" or "regular" or "ideal" education.

(B) The guy who cuts my hair mentioned they pulled his kid out of school when the teacher wanted him to take Ritalin.  Parents thought he was an active boy.  Once they brought him home, if he couldn't sit still to do his math, they'd send him outside to run around for an hour.  Did the trick.  (Who knew?)

(C)  My dh's PhD adviser mentioned his daughter was homeschooling his grandchildren because her husband traveled overseas so much.  Why should their family be separated when the kids could learn so much in other countries.  

(D)  I feared most elementary teachers were afraid of math, even at the fancy private schools.  We decided to homeschool for K and see how it went.  It went fine.  

(E)  DH had a TA in college who was homeschooled.  He seemed normal/smart.  

-- How was your child homeschooled in the high school years? (Did you use WTM as a guide? Did your child take out of the home, online classes, or college classes?)

One dd is enrolled in regular high school.  My older daughter has mostly taken online classes.  We are frequent flyers at PA Homeschoolers, and in fact, dd just returned from their annual party at the Richman farm.  Also a few classes at Stanford OHS.  No DE.  I'm embarrassed to say I haven't read any SWB books, but I intend to!  

-- What did your child do after graduating? What is your child doing now?

Now wrapping up senior year.  Will be attending Stanford in the fall.  

Edited by daijobu
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-- What led you to homeschool?

My oldest had completed Kindergarten and 1st grade at a very expensive, private, international school. I was deeply unsatisfied with the quality of her education and how unkind and irresponsible the teachers had been. We were set to move to a less than desirable school and I would be putting my middle kid into school there as well. After spending two weeks on vacation with some great friends who homeschooled their similarly aged kids where the other mom and I talked "school" and made endless lists of resources, I ordered WTM and read it cover to cover with pen in hand, mostly on a transoceanic flight. I don't think I'd have made it so far without this board, my dear (and still endlessly patient) friend and mentor, and that first copy of WTM.

-- How was your child homeschooled in the high school years? (Did you use WTM as a guide? Did your child take out of the home, online classes, or college classes?)

Two graduates so far. Both were home educated from elementary through high school.  I would say we were WTM/classically inspired with a smattering of Charlotte Mason principles and some Montessori influences in the early years. I tended to look for the curricula that best suited the kids and accomplished our college prep goals. During high school they did a combination of online coursework and regular home schooling courses. I frequently wrote my own AP syllabi which we submitted to College Board.  One took JROTC at our local high school for two years (he would have happily done all four if we had lived in the area sooner). We also participated in language classes as a family while overseas and one of the kids had some private tutoring to accompany one of their online courses (it was a course with little teacher presence and one that was beyond my ability to teach effectively). 

-- What did your child do after graduating? What is your child doing now?

Clemmie, the oldest, is about to start her senior year in college. She has been incredibly active in student government, participated in a international academic conference, taken on a variety of student leadership rolls, worked on college committees with faculty, administration, and the president, participated in sports and acted as team manager, and now works for admissions. She is spending the summer working in an internship in her chosen field. She disproves daily the homeschoolers are unsocialized myth.

Spencer, the middle, is about to start sophomore year in college. He attends his number one choice school on a Marine Corps option NROTC scholarship. He's spending a month with us this summer before heading off with the other ROTC students for their summer program and then immediately returning to school to help lead the new students through their orientation period (it's a military school so it's more like boot camp with moments of academic advising).

Winston, the youngest, is still at home working through middle school. (Yup-there is a huge gap.) Our intent is to homeschool him through high school as well. Depending on the school district we may look into more options for him to take a course or two at a local school or even add Dual Enrollment to the mix. We'll just have to see where we are in two years.

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What led you to homeschool?
Briefly, we knew we could provide a better education than the schools available to us.

How was your child homeschooled in the high school years? (Did you use WTM as a guide? Did your child take out of the home, online classes, or college classes?)
The WTM informed our studies through the middle school years; less so during high school. Both the oldest and the youngest entered the local college as dual enrolled students for their senior year of high school.

What did your child do after graduating? What is your child doing now?
My oldest became a Marine after earning his Associate of Science (AS) with high honors. As many WTMers know, he died nearly nine years ago.

My daughters transferred to the state flagship after earning their AS degrees, also with high honors. Both were in the University honors program, which, as it turns out, is not common for transfer students because of the difficulty one faces in meeting the program challenges in a compressed time frame. Both succeeded.

The older daughter graduated last year with a BS in psychology and several  academic honors in addition to the honors program designation. She has worked as a public school paraprofessional educator for the last year. This summer, she is working in the school’s extended year program.

The younger daughter graduated this May with a BS in physics, several academic honors (including highest distinction departmental honors) in addition to the honors program designation, several offers of admission to PhD programs (all fully funded), and an invitation to return to the national laboratory at which she interned last summer (an invitation she happily accepted). The PhD program she chose has set my daughters, who are best friends, on a path to the East Coast, where the older daughter will work for one more year before beginning her Masters in Teaching and the younger will begin her PhD in physics.

Edited by Melissa M
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I have so enjoyed reading this thread! I haven't posted in years, but I still pop back in every once in a while when I need a good book recommendation.

I'll just talk about my kids in one post, since there are only two of them and they used the same books.

-- What led you to homeschool?

We homeschooled for academic reasons.

-- How was your child homeschooled in the high school years? (Did you use WTM as a guide? Did your child take out of the home, online classes, or college classes?)

We did use WTM as a guide, and it was just right for us. We did not use outside classes, except for performing arts (music, theatre, dance). 

-- What did your child do after graduating? What is your child doing now?

My son was a national merit finalist, and took a full ride scholarship at University of Kentucky, where he graduated Magna Cum Laude (I think?) with a degree in classics. He is working on his masters degree (fully funded!) at University of Arizona; he is leading classics camps for high schoolers this summer, and is a TA for the Latin intensive classes. I believe he also tutors undergraduates. My daughter qualified for many scholarships, but refused to go away to school. She is taking art and accounting classes at the community college (she only attends because I require it, but she is doing very well, and I hope she'll eventually transfer to the state flagship), and works part time at the shopping center near our home.

They are both very happy, and if I could go back and do anything differently, I probably wouldn't!

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