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Sooooo, I'm rethinking ancients for my rising 9th grade son.  I had intended to use HOTAW for him, but now that I'm looking at it, I'm not sure that'll work for him.  It may be a bit too mature for him.

 

So what else is there?  He likes history and will probably want more than a handful of cursory chapters.  He liked Human Odyssey, but he did the ancients sections in fifth grade.  I looked at MOH, but according to the samples, it's a lot of "do outside research on X," and I'm pretty sure he also isn't going to want to do that.  I'm not looking for a literature based approach, more like a textbook, but a narrative style.  He would prefer to have it all laid out for him easily.  I liked the looks of the questions in the HOTAW teacher guide.  

 

What other suggestions can you give me?

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World History: Our Human Story is the high school level of the K12 books (Human Odyssey is the middle school level).  It's almost 1000 pages, so presumably you could just do the ancients pages (I'm guessing 250 pages or so) and supplement as desired.  

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I like Glencoe's World History (authored by Spielvogel).  You can see it at this link http://glhssocialstudies.weebly.com/world-history-textbook---pdf-copy.html

When my oldest did ancients - medieval in 9th, I actually went kind of easy on the history reading/output because he was really into the literature for that time (Iliad, Odyssey, Oedipus cycle, plus lots of other reading that my barely caffeinated brain cannot dredge up right now).  It was lit heavy, and history light.  I would have used the Spielvogel text if I had owned it at that time. 

 

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--- argh, just re-read the original post and my answer is a bust.

Edited by Lori D.

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Okay, back again with a new suggestion: The Oxford University Press series, which mostly are listed for grades 6-9 or grades 7-10, or grade 8/9 and up. More narrative in style, and definitely at a student (rather than adult) level. Maybe pick 6 of them and do 1 every 6 weeks? Since the reading level is at a middle school level, it should be manageable (about 25-30 pages/week), and since they are longer, that should provide some depth that is high school level. Perhaps use the Primary Sources volume along with them? Downside is that it would be pricey to purchase multiple books to cover the ancient World, plus separate student guides.

The Early Human World (176 pages) -- and student guide
The Ancient Near Eastern World (176 pages) -- and student guide
The Ancient Southern Asian World (176 pages) -- and student guide
The Ancient Chinese World (176 pages) -- and student guide
The Ancient American World ( 176 pages) -- and student guide
The Ancient Egyptian World (192 pages) -- and student guide
The Ancient Greek World (192 pages) -- and student guide
The Ancient Roman World (192 pages) -- and student guide

The World in Ancient Times: Primary Sources and Reference Volume (192 pages)


And as a side note, there are also volumes to go with Medieval/Renaissance/Exploration (I'm also seeing some student guides and teacher guides for some of the volumes):
The African and Middle Eastern World -- 600-1500AD ( 178 pages)
The European World -- 400-1450AD (192 pages)
An Age of Empires -- 1200-1700 (160 pages)
An Age of Voyages -- 1350-1600 (192 pages)
An Age of Science and Revolutions -- 1600-1800 (176 pages)

Medieval and Early Modern World: Primary Sources and Reference Volume (176 pages)

Edited by Lori D.
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DD 14 really likes HOTAW. The chapters are short, very manageable, but engaging on a deeper level than SOTW. I don't assign most of the writing as writing - we do it orally instead and have just a few history essays, and more projects. What aspect seems to not be a fit?  A student who can do Human Odyssey in 5th sounds ready to me 😄

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23 minutes ago, Bocky said:

DD 14 really likes HOTAW. The chapters are short, very manageable, but engaging on a deeper level than SOTW. I don't assign most of the writing as writing - we do it orally instead and have just a few history essays, and more projects. What aspect seems to not be a fit?  A student who can do Human Odyssey in 5th sounds ready to me 😄

It just seems a bit grown up for him.  I don't have the whole thing, just the sample, but there's at least one reference to sex in the sample, right off. My rising senior is considering it, and I think it's fine for her, but maybe not for younger brother.  He's also a slowish reader, so while he did do HO in 5th, getting through HOTAW would be grueling on him.

 

I don't really want to use the ancients chapters of a world history book because I don't really want to put my own supplements together too much.

 

@Lori D., those actually might work very nicely!  Our library has a few of them, and used, they aren't too expensive.  I ordered one book and the student guide to see how they look.  Thanks!

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10 hours ago, MamaSprout said:

That reference in the sample is pretty much it. I'm listening to it on audio for myself right now.

Another option is Humanistic Traditions: https://www.amazon.com/humanistic-tradition/s?k=humanistic+tradition

I showed it and Spielvogel to my dd and she thinks HT is more readable.

 

Ah, good to know. Well, we may end up using it, or not. I think it'll be fine for my 12th grader, and I'll see what my 9th grader wants to use.  Thanks for the HT suggestion also; at least now I feel like I have plenty of options. 

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So, I ordered some of the books @Lori D. suggested.  Used, they aren't too expensive, and I don't need them all at once.  I actually think they will work very well.  I'm still waiting on a teaching guide to look at output/review for sure, but from the samples I've seen online, I think they'll be helpful.  The Great Courses also has a series on Ancient Art that should dovetail nicely, so we will aim for about 30 book pages a week, plus a video, plus one or two of the selections from the primary sources book, plus some sort of output.  If that turns out to be too much, we will drop the American book (in favor of doing it with US history) and one other of his choosing.

 

I'm very vaguely concerned about not being chronological enough, although each civilization will be, and of course, they will mention each other as needed.  We'll be doing it mostly semi-chronologically, starting with early humans, Romans being last.  I think he will be fine.  He's done a timeline in the past; I don't know that it's going to be necessary this time.  At any rate, thank you, Lori, for suggesting those!

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