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Arctic Mama

UPDATE Used student flute - good deal? Heeeelp!

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UPDATE!  Help me shop?  I got the go ahead from my husband to spend $400-ish on a solid intermediate-ish used flute.  These are two that look solid from my research.  Untested and with only PayPal disputes to help me, which would you choose and why?

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Yamaha-381-Flute-Open-Hole-Silver-Head-Joint-925/113729892887?hash=item1a7ad47217:g:mdAAAOSw0i9cVM0f

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Jupiter-Carnegie-XL-Series-Flute-CF-750-SN-H00801-Silver-Body-Very-Nice-Sound/333144442364?hash=item4d90f4c5fc:g:KzwAAOSwZq5by1oI

Edited by Arctic Mama
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I don't think I paid that much for my used student flute, back a million years ago.  Truly it was like 1992, but I think I paid like $50.  

I am not sure I actually ever got rid of it.  I know I don't have it here in the house, but it might be in my parents attic.  I know it's CL but, I don't think CL is gonna move that fast here for flutes....I will be seeing my parents on Friday, I can check for you if you want.  I have no idea what shape it might be in, IF it's still there, but free is free.  

 

I really wanted to play the piccolo lol

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I got a Gemeinhardt as a teen many years ago as well.  Back then, it didn't have to be pretty and mine wasn't.  But it sounded fine.  The only thing I would suggest is to look closely at the pads.  If peeling, they will need to be replaced and can be at a local instrument shop.  If any are loose, maybe it lost a screw, which they will replace.  Make sure the keys don't stick as you press down on them and they return quickly to normal position.   I think a few tiny keys had corks instead of pads.    That's my 2 cents....

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My DS13’s former flute teacher did not like the Gemeinhardt entry level student flute. Many of her students had problems with it and had to have it repaired. DS13 has a Yamaha entry level student flute and it has gone under repair once (free as it was under music shop two year warranty). The music shop rarely had to repair a Yamaha student flute but my DS13 was a rough handling 8 years old then.

The music shop we go to would do an assessment of the flute when their flute repair person is in. Usually it’s a pad replacement issue.   For my kid’s Yamaha, it was an alignment issue because of his rough handling and we took lots of public transport in the summer heat (100degF) as well.

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yamaha is as good as gemeindhardt and at this stage won't make a difference

depending on model $225 used is a bit steep

might take it to a local music shop and have them look at the pads and springs

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We purchased like three student flutes on ebay for an average price of $30. One was in very good condition. One didn't have like the end mouthpiece thingee. One had a bent key that the local music shop fixed for free. We had them clean the very good one - put new pads on, whatever else - I think the cost was slightly over $100 for that service. 

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you could go, technically speaking, a very long way on a gemeinhardt starter flute

but if you were thinking she might at some point be fairly serious, what I would do (and this is just me) is buy either a Jupiter mid-level or a Yamaha/Gemeinhardt mid-level - headjoint silver, definitely open holed, maybe full silver if you can find a cheapish one - put plugs in the holes, and then you have a flute for all the way through high school, even if she turns out to be quite a good high school player.

If on the other hand you're just trying it on a lark, don't drop $200+; get a secondary brand (bundy, armstrong, etc.) for a song on ebay and have it tuned up if necessary.

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I'd also recommend buying used or new from a reputable music shop. We went the used from a personal sale for my daughter's first flute and regretted it. It needed a lot of $ put into it to replace pads and springs, and the darn thing was by nature pitchy. Four months later we forked out for a better flute.  

BTW, years later the original klunker flute is still going strong. 🙄 My daughter left it with the flute section at school and it gets used whenever one of them has their flute in the shop for repair. 

 

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39 minutes ago, Pippen said:

I'd also recommend buying used or new from a reputable music shop. We went the used from a personal sale for my daughter's first flute and regretted it. It needed a lot of $ put into it to replace pads and springs, and the darn thing was by nature pitchy. Four months later we forked out for a better flute.  

BTW, years later the original klunker flute is still going strong. 🙄 My daughter left it with the flute section at school and it gets used whenever one of them has their flute in the shop for repair. 

 

 

My FIL bought my son two student cornets for $50... Then fixed them up for him. Thankfully we got two because one ended up being glitchy. The other has lasted the year, but has issues that I have to wonder if it is because he bought them on Craigslist.

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You'll need to check the pads, corks, screws, and pins on the flute to make sure they are still good.  Do the keys respond quickly or is anything sticking or slow to respond? If a key pad is just a little sticky, sometimes you can spritz a little water on some cigarette paper, put it under the pad and press the key down, and then pull the paper out.  It kind of cleans the pads a little, but won't really work if the pads are in generally bad shape.  Check to make sure all the rods are straight and nothing is bent.  

Gemeinhardt flutes are just ok.  They aren't bad, but they aren't super amazing either.  You see a lot of Gemeinhardt flutes in student bands.  Yamaha has made some nice flutes over the years.  I don't know what the current quality is, but personally, I would buy a used Yamaha over a Gemeinhardt any day.  I don't like Bundy or Armstrong.  They always sounded dull to me, no matter who was playing it.

Ideally, a flute player should play the instrument a little before committing to a purchase.  A poor quality student model will be frustrating to play and can lead to students giving up on the instrument.  Do you have a flute teacher lined up for your daughter?  Maybe chat with him/her about buying a flute and ask them to try an instrument before purchase.  You can always rent a flute for awhile, too, while making decisions about a forever instrument.  There are tons and tons of used student instruments available for sale, so don't feel obligated to rush into purchasing one.  Gemeinhardt's aren't so rare that you won't be able to find another one for $225, which seems a little steep, honestly.  I am betting it's a nickel plated flute and not silver plated or with a silver head joint.  For reference, you can buy a NEW student Gemeinhardt on Amazon for $329 and have the option to return it if you hate it or the flute teacher thinks it's a dud.  There's no return option with Craigslist.   

(My street cred: Former flute major at a snooty East Coast music school, although it was a long, long time ago).    

 

Edited by MissLemon
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My flute teacher was also a former flute major at a snooty East Coast music school, almost certainly an even longer time ago, and she had the same opinion about Yamahas. 

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We didn't have flute players, but had other instruments. My own thought is that you can get just abut anything for the first year.  That first year you're just figuring out the basics, deciding if you like it, if you're even going to continue.  We got our dd's clarinet at a Goodwill for $50.  We then brought it into a musical instrument store to have a few things fixed up on it.  (nothing major -- maybe cost an additional $25.)  It turned out to be a nice instrument.  But, even if it wasn't that nice, it probably would have been fine for the first year while she was trying to decide if she even wanted to keep playing it.  Then you can always put more money down on a nicer one the next year.  

But also, talk to your friends and family.  So many people have old instruments lying around that they don't know what to do with.  They might be happy just to give it to you!

 

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There is a Yamaha 225S also available used locally for $145, which sounds like it might be a better value given what’s stated here.  Someone also has a 225N but even I know we’d prefer the silver to the nickel. 

This is all super helpful.  We do have a teacher lined up, our piano teacher who we love actually teaches flute as well (though hers costs as much as my van did!), and she is the one who recommended Craigslist as less of a rip-off than the local music store 🤣

I worried about buying one off eBay because I can’t handle and examine it for damage, but the cost difference is pretty notable compared to local. I could get her a much nicer flute for the same money if I don’t buy locally, but I just wasn’t sure how wise that was.  She will be playing for at least several years with weekly private lessons, and is already a fairly skilled musician, so I didn’t just want to get her a crap model because I know how frustrating it is to play on a dodgy instrument.

Edited by Arctic Mama
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Lots of wonderful advice in this thread for the OP...   Usually, when buying something I know nothing about, after researching to try to learn some basic things that are involved, I would suggest going into a store and getting their suggestions and if I buy from them and have an issue, hopefully they would fix it under warranty. But if you only have one local music store and think it's a rip off, look on eBay.   I would buy, any day, from a reputable eBay Seller and not from someone on CL.  There are (probably) many wonderful people selling on CL, but eBay is safer and you have the possibility of buying from many different sellers.  Renting is a good option at first, until one "gets their feet wet" and sees whether or not there is interest in continuing with that instrument.  If I bought it from someone on eBay, I would want to be able to take it to a local music store, to have it inspected and to see if it needed to be "tuned" before using it and that if the music store repair found a major issue, that I could return it to the Seller for a refund to my PayPal account

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I think if you can buy used through a shop it will be a much safer purchase.  $225 seems steep for an unvetted beginner instrument through Craig's List.  We've had great luck with used violins through a shop and they follow up with servicing when necessary.  

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14 minutes ago, FuzzyCatz said:

I think if you can buy used through a shop it will be a much safer purchase.  $225 seems steep for an unvetted beginner instrument through Craig's List.  We've had great luck with used violins through a shop and they follow up with servicing when necessary.  

I was surprised our teacher recommended against it, but she seems to think their margins for service on used instruments aren’t justified.  It wasn’t what I was expecting her to say!

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@MissLemon, @Pippen, @moonflower And everyone else -  How much of a big deal is it if a flute is tarnished or the finish is worn?  I have a lead on a pretty reasonable Gemeinhardt M3 that has new pads already, and no big dents or dings, but it was obviously played for years and has finish wear on the keys/holes.  Would a lower end model of something that is visibly more pristine be a better bet, or are those sort of use/cosmetic defects not something that would affect the sound of the instrument?

I’m poking around eBay but wasn’t really sure if a well used instrument that looked to be cared for was a better bet than a more pristine one that just sat in a box? I know for stringed instruments the storage conditions and care matter very much. But are flutes the same?

Edited by Arctic Mama

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Would your flute teacher be willing to meet with you and the Craigslist seller and examine the instrument? My daughter’s oboe teacher tracked down the oboe we purchased.

As an aside the Craigslist flute could be someone selling an unwanted instrument but it’s just as likely to be someone selling a stolen instrument. 

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I recommend Yamaha.  I played one, a cheap student model, I barely practiced, but I had perfect tone quality. In high school the 2nd chair planning on a professional music career bought a new she claimed professional level Gemeinhardt and she got REALLY angry when she heard me play.  She asked to play my flute for a minute so I handed it over and she got furious that my flute sounded better than hers.  I think my mom paid something like $500 for it.  I had it serviced and the pads redone once for something like $60-75.  When I sold it I was offered $550 for it and took it.

They are periodically for sale on Amazon.

There's also a really inexpensive brand sold on Amazon that has some good reviews from professional musicians.  Let me find the review.  I might start with that and if your child actually practices an hour a day move up to a mid level open hole Yamaha.

 

ETA: You wouldn't need to move up right away.  I don't think anyone who started in 6th grade was ready for a higher level flute until high school.

Edited by Katy
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19 minutes ago, hshibley said:

Would your flute teacher be willing to meet with you and the Craigslist seller and examine the instrument? My daughter’s oboe teacher tracked down the oboe we purchased.

As an aside the Craigslist flute could be someone selling an unwanted instrument but it’s just as likely to be someone selling a stolen instrument. 

The models around here honestly seem like they’re being sold by parents who are emptying their houses or young adults who don’t play anymore.  None of the ones I’ve looked at are nice enough that stolen seems likely, but what do I know?  That was one of my concerns with eBay, I’ll admit.

I’d ask my teacher/friend to come along and look at the flutes but she is stupidly busy.  Like, both of us need to drop about ten things from our schedules 🤣 I will go ahead and float the idea to her and see what she says though.

Gemeinhardt guy won’t budge on price, says he got it for $750 but won’t tell me the model number, so I thanked him for his time and am moving on.  The Yamaha 225s is still available and looks to be in good shape, fairly new felt and all that, so if I don’t see some promising eBay flutes I think I may try to drag said teacher along to look at that one with me.  She’s busy trying to get a horse into surgery this weekend though, so that’s out until next week.

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21 minutes ago, Katy said:

 

I’ve seen a few of these videos and they were so helpful, it’s a really interesting channel. I don’t believe I watched the bottom one so thank you for the link, @Katy ! This kiddo is required to practice for 30-60 minutes daily on piano currently and flute would be the same, with a solid foundation in music theory already, so that helps things.  I’m now leaning toward either a well loved intermediate or one of the newer Yamaha beginner flutes based on recs here.

 

Really, thank you all so much.  I’m soaking this up and it’s helping me with my research.  YAY!

Edited by Arctic Mama

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12 hours ago, moonflower said:

you could go, technically speaking, a very long way on a gemeinhardt starter flute

but if you were thinking she might at some point be fairly serious, what I would do (and this is just me) is buy either a Jupiter mid-level or a Yamaha/Gemeinhardt mid-level - headjoint silver, definitely open holed, maybe full silver if you can find a cheapish one - put plugs in the holes, and then you have a flute for all the way through high school, even if she turns out to be quite a good high school player.

If on the other hand you're just trying it on a lark, don't drop $200+; get a secondary brand (bundy, armstrong, etc.) for a song on ebay and have it tuned up if necessary.

Can you tell me more about the Jupiter?  We have a Carnegie CXL , whatever that is, being sold by a local flutist (flautist?) that is in pretty much mint condition, but I was wary because I hadn’t heard of the brand.   

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3 hours ago, Arctic Mama said:

I’m poking around eBay but wasn’t really sure if a well used instrument that looked to be cared for was a better bet than a more pristine one that just sat in a box? 

 

I’ll take a well used, cared for flute. My kid is good at cleaning his flute after practice to look pristine but he wasn’t as good at keeping the other parts of the flute in working condition. He can make silverware look good.

“Removing dirt from the surface of the instrument” in link was what he was good at, “removing moisture from the body of the flute” not so good and he did not do the “removing moisture from the pads” steps.

https://www.yamaha.com/en/musical_instrument_guide/flute/maintenance/

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46 minutes ago, Arcadia said:

 

I’ll take a well used, cared for flute. My kid is good at cleaning his flute after practice to look pristine but he wasn’t as good at keeping the other parts of the flute in working condition. He can make silverware look good.

“Removing dirt from the surface of the instrument” in link was what he was good at, “removing moisture from the body of the flute” not so good and he did not do the “removing moisture from the pads” steps.

https://www.yamaha.com/en/musical_instrument_guide/flute/maintenance/

Thank you for the link.  I could see this kid being lazy on maintenance so I’ll have to impress upon her that it’s more than just polish-til-you-sparkles. She’d be the person accidentally ripping their felt from careless or aggressive cloth polishing too close to the pads 🙄

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3 hours ago, Arctic Mama said:

Can you tell me more about the Jupiter?  We have a Carnegie CXL , whatever that is, being sold by a local flutist (flautist?) that is in pretty much mint condition, but I was wary because I hadn’t heard of the brand.   

Jupiter flutes are lovely!  I have a semi-pro level Jupiter that I played through college.  Gorgeous.  ❤️  My flute teacher and I tried it, a few Yamahas, and something else and went with the Jupiter. 

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34 minutes ago, MissLemon said:

Jupiter flutes are lovely!  I have a semi-pro level Jupiter that I played through college.  Gorgeous.  ❤️  My flute teacher and I tried it, a few Yamahas, and something else and went with the Jupiter. 

Thank you!  If the Yamaha falls through I’ll look into that Jupiter.

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7 minutes ago, Arcadia said:

Oooh, that’s helpful, I’ve had a hard time comparing among a lot of these models with discontinued runs or long manufacture dates.

 

EDIT - holy cow, I think the Gemeinhardt guy really did pay $750 for an SP-1 or 2.  Oooouch.

Edited by Arctic Mama

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Just now, happysmileylady said:

Just wanted to FYI, I talked to my mom, she said we sold the flute back when I moved into my own apartment lol.  

Thanks for asking 🙂. The flute I used back in the day is still with my mom but she uses it, it was only ever on loan to *me*!  I lost track of it for a few years and it turns out it’s because she absconded with it again.

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UPDATE!

 

 Help me shop?  I got the go ahead from my husband to spend $400-ish on a good intermediate-ish used flute.  These are two that look really solid from my research.  Untested and with only PayPal disputes to help me, which would you choose and why?

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Yamaha-381-Flute-Open-Hole-Silver-Head-Joint-925/113729892887?hash=item1a7ad47217:g:mdAAAOSw0i9cVM0f

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Jupiter-Carnegie-XL-Series-Flute-CF-750-SN-H00801-Silver-Body-Very-Nice-Sound/333144442364?hash=item4d90f4c5fc:g:KzwAAOSwZq5by1oI

 

He was more comfortable with eBay than Craigslist because we could at least have some sort of return/dispute policy if there was an issue.

Edited by Arctic Mama

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The Jupiter has an offset G - if you have a small-handed or young player that will be handy.  Might want a picture of the pads on the jupiter, the listing says some life left but has no photos; pads on the yamaha look decent

 

a full re-pad used to be $70 or so so it's an important enough consideration

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I would pick the Yamaha based on what I can see.  There is too much wear to the gold lip plate on the Jupiter for my liking, (Was the kid chewing on it, lol?).  Condition and construction of the lip plate is so important to getting a good tone from the instrument. Even if the scratches to the gold don't look deep, you can definitely feel that unevenness on your lip when you play, and it will impact how you position your lip and your embouchure. I think the tone quality will not be as nice with the worn lip plate.

Also, the inline G of the Yamaha is preferable over the offset G of the Jupiter.  I've always found it odd that people will pay money for the upgrade to open holed flutes but then stick with the beginner-style offset G.  Closed holes and offset G are for little hands that have trouble getting into the correct position.  

   

    

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Is it really necessary to buy off ebay? Have you checked with local stores, or stores within an hour or two driving distance, to check out instruments in person?  I would hate to put that kind of money toward an instrument that may not turn out to be all you had hoped.  

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8 hours ago, klmama said:

Is it really necessary to buy off ebay? Have you checked with local stores, or stores within an hour or two driving distance, to check out instruments in person?  I would hate to put that kind of money toward an instrument that may not turn out to be all you had hoped.  

Good question!  When I chatted with our teacher she indicated that she liked our local service center very much, but that the cost of their flutes wasn’t worth the hit, even for used equipment.  She recommended Craigslist or online purchasing and then bringing it into Hauer for service/overhaul/adjustment /cleaning before we begin lessons on it.  I’m running these by her as well, but for anything other than one of the cheaper beginner flutes she said online was probably my best bet.  And eBay or Gina’s Flutes or wherever I have some recourse, which my husband felt better about than local private sale.  I discussed this thread with both of them too 🙂

Edited by Arctic Mama

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I like ebay for things like this, actually

you have a lot more information about the seller than with craigslist, and often the price reduction from a local shop is significant enough to make it totally worth it

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4 minutes ago, moonflower said:

I like ebay for things like this, actually

you have a lot more information about the seller than with craigslist, and often the price reduction from a local shop is significant enough to make it totally worth it

I haven't bought wind instruments on eBay but I have purchased a lot of string instruments that I have been happy with; I agree that the discount is worth it for known quality instrument brands bought used.

I still keep a watch on certain violin and cello brands for fractional instruments; I have the ones I need but when a good deal on a quality instrument comes up I can notify friends or family members who may be looking. My brother just nabbed a nice 1/4 size cello for his son 🙂

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I think the thing with band/orchestra instruments in general is that it's like baby furniture - a lot of people buy them at a certain point, use welllllll under their useful life, then are done.  So for me it's silly to buy new and makes a lot of sense to check out ebay/craigslist because of the quantity of decent quality things from good brands available.  We buy kids rain and snow boots used on Ebay too for the same reason.  Then we use them right up, because we have so many kids. 🙂

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The first one you showed is an eBay auction. If you bid on that, use the Free Gixen Sniping service, which will put your bid in during the last seconds of the eBay auction. https://www.gixen.com/index.php    Give Gixen your Maximum Bid, they will bid the lowest that is possible, below that number.

That Seller doesn't take returns, but if there is an issue, you will hopefully be covered by the eBay Money Back Guarantee.

As I write this (952 A.M., E.D.T.) there are no bids on that item. If you think it is worth that much (I have zero knowledge of the value) bid the minimum which is currently $450 USD or a maximum of one dollar above that. You won't know if there are other people interested until the last seconds when the Sniping bids are processed.

DO NOT BID with the eBay Bidding system. That increases the price the winning bidder pays. Use Gixen to place your bid by Sniping during the last seconds of eBay auctions.

If it were me, the item seems fragile and I would prefer a different shipping method, especially since the Seller charges $8.10 for Shipping.


The Jupiter Seller, has as I recall, more Feedbacks.  VERY IMPORTANT always, to read the Feedbacks of the eBay Seller for things they have sold, not for things they have purchased.

That one is Buy it Now, which is the way most of the things we have purchased on eBay have been purchased. However, it also has a "Make Offer" option.  I forget the rules on that, but I believe if you make an offer, the Seller then has 2 or 3 days to accept or reject your offer. If they accept,it is a binding transaction, so think about whether or not you want to wait that long to know whether or not the Seller has accepted your offer, before you make an offer. I've done that once or twice, but prefer not to be waiting for their decision...

That one ships via USPS Priority Mail which I suspect is better and faster than the item referred to at the top of this. $20.00 in addition to whatever you pay for the item, for shipping.

Like the first Seller you listed, this Seller does not accept returns and the item is covered by the eBay Money Back Guarantee if there is something terribly wrong, misrepresentation, etc.  

I like the description which seems to list the defects for you. I do not know the signifigance of the following words and what it would cost to replace them:  "Pads have some use left in them."   Does that mean the Pads are worn out?  If so, what is the cost to replace them?

Good luck. Look before you leap. Investigate.  Message any Seller you are contemplating buying from, with any questions you might have and to see that they respond.
 

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47 minutes ago, Lanny said:

The first one you showed is an eBay auction. If you bid on that, use the Free Gixen Sniping service, which will put your bid in during the last seconds of the eBay auction. https://www.gixen.com/index.php    Give Gixen your Maximum Bid, they will bid the lowest that is possible, below that number.

That Seller doesn't take returns, but if there is an issue, you will hopefully be covered by the eBay Money Back Guarantee.

As I write this (952 A.M., E.D.T.) there are no bids on that item. If you think it is worth that much (I have zero knowledge of the value) bid the minimum which is currently $450 USD or a maximum of one dollar above that. You won't know if there are other people interested until the last seconds when the Sniping bids are processed.

DO NOT BID with the eBay Bidding system. That increases the price the winning bidder pays. Use Gixen to place your bid by Sniping during the last seconds of eBay auctions.

If it were me, the item seems fragile and I would prefer a different shipping method, especially since the Seller charges $8.10 for Shipping.


The Jupiter Seller, has as I recall, more Feedbacks.  VERY IMPORTANT always, to read the Feedbacks of the eBay Seller for things they have sold, not for things they have purchased.

That one is Buy it Now, which is the way most of the things we have purchased on eBay have been purchased. However, it also has a "Make Offer" option.  I forget the rules on that, but I believe if you make an offer, the Seller then has 2 or 3 days to accept or reject your offer. If they accept,it is a binding transaction, so think about whether or not you want to wait that long to know whether or not the Seller has accepted your offer, before you make an offer. I've done that once or twice, but prefer not to be waiting for their decision...

That one ships via USPS Priority Mail which I suspect is better and faster than the item referred to at the top of this. $20.00 in addition to whatever you pay for the item, for shipping.

Like the first Seller you listed, this Seller does not accept returns and the item is covered by the eBay Money Back Guarantee if there is something terribly wrong, misrepresentation, etc.  

I like the description which seems to list the defects for you. I do not know the signifigance of the following words and what it would cost to replace them:  "Pads have some use left in them."   Does that mean the Pads are worn out?  If so, what is the cost to replace them?

Good luck. Look before you leap. Investigate.  Message any Seller you are contemplating buying from, with any questions you might have and to see that they respond.
 

You know in all the years I’ve used eBay for various things I’ve never used sniping programs but I’m getting very tired of losing out on items at the last minute with the existing system, I will look into this, thank you Lanny.  And yes, the Jupiter seller has more feedback and I just emailed them for picture closeups of the embouchure hole and the felt under the keys, we will see how responsive they are and the condition of the instrument with macro 🙂

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1 hour ago, Lanny said:

The first one you showed is an eBay auction. If you bid on that, use the Free Gixen Sniping service, which will put your bid in during the last seconds of the eBay auction. https://www.gixen.com/index.php    Give Gixen your Maximum Bid, they will bid the lowest that is possible, below that number.

That Seller doesn't take returns, but if there is an issue, you will hopefully be covered by the eBay Money Back Guarantee.

As I write this (952 A.M., E.D.T.) there are no bids on that item. If you think it is worth that much (I have zero knowledge of the value) bid the minimum which is currently $450 USD or a maximum of one dollar above that. You won't know if there are other people interested until the last seconds when the Sniping bids are processed.

DO NOT BID with the eBay Bidding system. That increases the price the winning bidder pays. Use Gixen to place your bid by Sniping during the last seconds of eBay auctions.

If it were me, the item seems fragile and I would prefer a different shipping method, especially since the Seller charges $8.10 for Shipping.


The Jupiter Seller, has as I recall, more Feedbacks.  VERY IMPORTANT always, to read the Feedbacks of the eBay Seller for things they have sold, not for things they have purchased.

That one is Buy it Now, which is the way most of the things we have purchased on eBay have been purchased. However, it also has a "Make Offer" option.  I forget the rules on that, but I believe if you make an offer, the Seller then has 2 or 3 days to accept or reject your offer. If they accept,it is a binding transaction, so think about whether or not you want to wait that long to know whether or not the Seller has accepted your offer, before you make an offer. I've done that once or twice, but prefer not to be waiting for their decision...

That one ships via USPS Priority Mail which I suspect is better and faster than the item referred to at the top of this. $20.00 in addition to whatever you pay for the item, for shipping.

Like the first Seller you listed, this Seller does not accept returns and the item is covered by the eBay Money Back Guarantee if there is something terribly wrong, misrepresentation, etc.  

I like the description which seems to list the defects for you. I do not know the signifigance of the following words and what it would cost to replace them:  "Pads have some use left in them."   Does that mean the Pads are worn out?  If so, what is the cost to replace them?

Good luck. Look before you leap. Investigate.  Message any Seller you are contemplating buying from, with any questions you might have and to see that they respond.
 

 

Honestly, any instrument I bought used (but not from a store) I'd expect to need to replace pads. I put my clarinet away in great condition. But stored it for a time and when I brought it back out, felt the pads needed replacing.

Edited by vonfirmath
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You might want to double check that local store.  It may be that while a bit more, they include a discount on repairs and a once a year check and cleaning.  For some unknown reason, our local music store has a reputation for being high on instruments. They are not all ( I got DD flute there.  

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33 minutes ago, itsheresomewhere said:

You might want to double check that local store.  It may be that while a bit more, they include a discount on repairs and a once a year check and cleaning.  For some unknown reason, our local music store has a reputation for being high on instruments. They are not all ( I got DD flute there.  

I have to run to Michaels tonight and it’s right by there, so I will swing in while I’m out and look around.

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Yamaha for all the reasons you already know.

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