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Noreen Claire

Did we diagram this correctly?

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We decided to try and diagram a sentence out of the Kilgallon book today. He's been diagramming in FLL4, but this sentence is a bit more complicated than what he's done yet. 

How did we do?

IMG_20190430_104335259.jpg

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I disagree with the second verb section: out doesn't seem like a preposition here. I would diagram license as the direct object and out as a particle.

Edited by whitehawk
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12 minutes ago, whitehawk said:

I disagree with the second verb section: out doesn't seem like a preposition here. I would diagram license as the direct object and out as a particle.

That makes sense. I haven't diagrammed anything since grade school! I'm looking forward to Grammar for the Well Trained Mind next year (DS10 not so much).

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4 hours ago, whitehawk said:

I disagree with the second verb section: out doesn't seem like a preposition here. I would diagram license as the direct object and out as a particle.

I would diagram “license” as a direct object, too, but I may diagram “out” as an adverb answering the question “where” for the verb “got”, which I really don’t like. Mentally I substituted “took” for “got”.  Whitehawk may be right, though, too. I’m not too familiar with particles.

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One simple way to help distinguish between prep and adv (fwiw, I would classify out as an adv.  I don't even know what a particle is 😕 Beyond my level of simple grammar knowledge) is to try moving the word and seeing if it still makes sense. 

He got out his license.

He got his license out.

The second one retains the same meaning so out is not acting as a preposition with license as its object.

Whereas, "The fairy flew out the window" vs "The fairy flew the window out" demonstrates that the word out is being used as a prep with window as its object.

Edited by 8FillTheHeart
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I view "got out" as some sort of verb phrase.  Like you could replace it with "displayed" or "exposed."  So then "his license" is the direct object of "displayed" here replaced with "got out" which is colloquial.  

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40 minutes ago, daijobu said:

I view "got out" as some sort of verb phrase.  Like you could replace it with "displayed" or "exposed."  So then "his license" is the direct object of "displayed" here replaced with "got out" which is colloquial.  

Yeah, I wasn’t thrilled with “got out”, either.

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I agree with everyone above who would make “license” the direct object of “got.” I would accept diagramming “got out” as either (a) the verb “got” modified by the adverb “out”, just as you did with the second “out,”  or (b) a phrasal verb.

A phrasal verb often looks like a verb + adverb, but the combination has a different meaning from what the words mean individually. (A phrasal verb is different from a verb phrase. A phrasal verb looks like a verb + adverb, such as “get out”. A verb phrase is helping verbs + main verb, such as “can get”.)

When trying to decide if a word combination is a phrasal verb, I will often look it up in a dictionary that includes definitions of phrasal verbs. One of my dictionaries lists “get out” with the definition of “to produce,” which is the meaning used in this sentence.

Your 10 year old did a great job diagraming the sentence!

Edited by Kuovonne
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