Jump to content

Menu

Ideas for English 12 after AP Eng Lang


Recommended Posts

DD17 is taking AP Eng Lang this year.  She wants a light English year(she will be taking AP Physics C and AP Calc BC), so we will be doing a homegrown class.  

So, I was thinking some class around a Great Courses series?  She wants a literature-rich class, as this year was focused more on writing and she misses her Sonlight years.:)

Any ideas?She has already read the "ancients" and only has patience for a little Shakespeare.  She has read some British Lit.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My daughter also wanted a more fun and literature rich 12th grade year after an intense year of PA Homeschooler AP English Language class in 11th grade.

We decided we'd read together all those books which for some reason or other, we'd never gotten around to reading, but would be a shame to miss.

The year started with How To Read Literature Like a Professor, which gave us a basis in analyzing literature. We then went on to read The Great Gatsby, The Awakening, The Bell Jar, Wuthering Heights, Beloved, Heart of Darkness, Macbeth, The Poisonwood Bible, The Glass Menagerie, a bunch of Chaim Potok, and a selection of short stories and poetry. I might be missing some, but I do remember that it was lots of fun!

 

 

Edited by Kathy in Richmond
  • Like 9
Link to comment
Share on other sites

59 minutes ago, Kathy in Richmond said:

My daughter also wanted a more fun and literature rich 12th grade year after an intense year of PA Homeschooler AP English Language class in 11th grade.

We decided we'd read together all those books which for some reason or other, we'd never gotten around to reading, but would be a shame to miss.

The year started with How To Read Literature Like a Professor, which gave us a basis in analyzing literature. We then went on to read The Great Gatsby, The Awakening, The Bell Jar, Wuthering Heights, Beloved, Heart of Darkness, Macbeth, The Poisonwood Bible, The Glass Menagerie, a bunch of Chaim Potok, and a selection of short stories and poetry. I might be missing some, but I do remember that it was lots of fun!

 

 

This is what she said she wanted today!  Just an assortment that fell through the cracks!  I LOVE your list, Kathy!  We have only read 1 of those.  And when she saw her sister(grade 8) reading The Great Gatsby this year, she was jealous!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, Kathy in Richmond said:

We decided we'd read together all those books which for some reason or other, we'd never gotten around to reading, but would be a shame to miss.

 

We did the same. She made a list of what she wanted to read, and we discussed them. Thankfully I had read most of what she chose in high school or in college, so it wasn't too hard. She was also in a local combined history/lit class, so she got some there.  She was a T.A. for PA Homeschoolers that year too. I didn't assign any additional writing other than her class and her T.A. work.

She's going to be a junior in the fall in college as an English major with a focus on Rhetoric and Professional Writing. AP English is what sealed the deal for her. We joke around because she's nearly the only one among her friends who knew as a high school junior what she wanted to major in.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can do what you want, that’s the fun of it, but I have rattling around in my head ideas for a magical realism class, Eastern European literature class, etc. I don’t know if we will get to do anything (he does dual enrollment too) but I’m collecting books in my head. 

Little unit studies might be fun too. I love the Yale open courses. There’s one on Milton (excellent), one on three American authors,  one on modern poetry, Dante, Cervantes, on and on. ...I’m using three lectures from the poetry one for a mini unit on The Waste Land (DS request) for example. 

I have a list, again in my head, of books DS must read if he is to graduate from my homeschool. I don’t think he will read these books even if he does a PhD in comparative literature. We won’t get to all of them but there is some required reading. I’m kind of in a panic that we have little time left together but that’s my issue. 

Edited by madteaparty
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It sounds like she hasn't done much American lit? I'd also just pick a genre, theme, time period, or location, and have at it. I would just make a list of novels and works and maybe come up with a few assignments. One biggish paper per quarter?

How about coming of age novels? Lots of good American lit there. But if she likes scifi or romance or something, I'd try to do something with that. Or drama. You could just watch and read great plays. Modern stuff.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 minutes ago, Farrar said:

It sounds like she hasn't done much American lit? I'd also just pick a genre, theme, time period, or location, and have at it. I would just make a list of novels and works and maybe come up with a few assignments. One biggish paper per quarter?

How about coming of age novels? Lots of good American lit there. But if she likes scifi or romance or something, I'd try to do something with that. Or drama. You could just watch and read great plays. Modern stuff.

She has read a lot of Am Lit.  Some books did not happen.  Here is the list we made.  What do you think?

Pride and Prejudice

Little Women

Man in the High Castle

The Great Gatsby

Frankenstein

Of Mice and Men

The Scarlet Letter

The Pearl

Uncle Tom's Cabin

Sir Gawain

Death of A Salesman

Fahrenheit 451

The War of the Worlds

The Glass Menagerie

Wuthering Heights

The Bell Jar

The Awakening

For Whom the Bell Tolls

The Old Man And the Sea

Macbeth

Dracula

The Jungle

A Raisin in the Sun

 

What kind of output?  She's a little old for a book report. LOL

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That list seems too long for a light English year. I'd cut it in half. A lot of the works are short, but... you don't need to read 23 books. That's just so much. It's also all classics. One of the nice things about having a light senior English year for a student who has "proven" herself in English already and plans to go into another field anyway is that you could read much more modern, more contemporary, more outside the box books. She checked boxes already. She could read really different stuff. She's interested in STEM? She could read novels with connections to science. Things like Oryx and Crake or Frankenstein (which is on your list) or Never Let Me Go...

My personal opinion... The Jungle and Uncle Tom's Cabin are not all that. They're books that were important in their moment, but wouldn't be remembered otherwise. If the goal is to read "good" books to enrich her literature experience, I'd skip them. I wouldn't read either of them unless they were in conjunction with history or part of a deep dive into their authors or periods. I also think War of the Worlds is a bit meh, and I generally like Wells. Time Machine and Moreau are both better. The Invisible Man is also meh, IMHO. The other books on your list... I like many of them personally. They're good classics. But I don't think any are absolute musts, but mostly because I don't think any book is an absolute must. If you want to be "well read" in American lit, then Gatsby, Of Mice and Men, and Scarlet Letter are three books that I'd say are in the top 20 or so to be checked off. But if she's read other things from those periods/genres, then they could be skipped. I note that your list is really not diverse at all. Raisin in the Sun is your only non-white author. If she hasn't read African American classics, then that would be a hole to fill. Or immigrant literature (Joy Luck Club! The House on Mango Street!). Or African or Asian literature (Things Fall Apart, Midnight's Children, and so on).

There's no theme there at all. You have books from all over time and both sides of the pond and without any central question or idea to tie them together. One way to cut the list would be to cut the US or the British books and see what that leaves you. Of course, you don't have to have a theme or a topic... I just think it's a natural way to enrich literature, to make it more of a conversation.

If you do want to keep it eclectic, you still might group books together. Dracula, Man in the High Castle, Fahrenheit 451, Frankenstein, and War of the Worlds would obviously "go together" in that they're all using speculative fiction to explore the human condition. The Awakening, The Bell Jar, Wuthering Heights, P&P, Little Women, and maybe The Scarlet Letter could be exploring women in fiction. Honestly, you could just have one semester of the first theme, one of the second. Or you could get less obvious... Of Mice and Men and P&P explore friendship. Macbeth, P&P, The Awakening all explore marriage. Dracula, Macbeth, Frankenstein all explore villains. Gatsby, Death of a Salesman... antiheroes. I could go on like this...

In terms of output... If she hasn't written much lit analysis, I'd do that for some books. Just look up essay topics. Or even compare and contrast for books. She could do some creative stuff for a book - write an alternate ending, write a letter in the voice of a character, etc. That sort of thing. She could do book reviews. She could write a book guide. She could make a video. You could find a set of short essay questions for some books and assign those.

Edited by Farrar
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, Farrar said:

That list seems too long for a light English year. I'd cut it in half. A lot of the works are short, but... you don't need to read 23 books. That's just so much. It's also all classics. One of the nice things about having a light senior English year for a student who has "proven" herself in English already and plans to go into another field anyway is that you could read much more modern, more contemporary, more outside the box books. She checked boxes already. She could read really different stuff. She's interested in STEM? She could read novels with connections to science. Things like Oryx and Crake or Frankenstein (which is on your list) or Never Let Me Go...

My personal opinion... The Jungle and Uncle Tom's Cabin are not all that. They're books that were important in their moment, but wouldn't be remembered otherwise. If the goal is to read "good" books to enrich her literature experience, I'd skip them. I wouldn't read either of them unless they were in conjunction with history or part of a deep dive into their authors or periods. I also think War of the Worlds is a bit meh, and I generally like Wells. Time Machine and Moreau are both better. The Invisible Man is also meh, IMHO. The other books on your list... I like many of them personally. They're good classics. But I don't think any are absolute musts, but mostly because I don't think any book is an absolute must. If you want to be "well read" in American lit, then Gatsby, Of Mice and Men, and Scarlet Letter are three books that I'd say are in the top 20 or so to be checked off. But if she's read other things from those periods/genres, then they could be skipped. I note that your list is really not diverse at all. Raisin in the Sun is your only non-white author. If she hasn't read African American classics, then that would be a hole to fill. Or immigrant literature (Joy Luck Club! The House on Mango Street!). Or African or Asian literature (Things Fall Apart, Midnight's Children, and so on).

There's no theme there at all. You have books from all over time and both sides of the pond and without any central question or idea to tie them together. One way to cut the list would be to cut the US or the British books and see what that leaves you. Of course, you don't have to have a theme or a topic... I just think it's a natural way to enrich literature, to make it more of a conversation.

If you do want to keep it eclectic, you still might group books together. Dracula, Man in the High Castle, Fahrenheit 451, Frankenstein, and War of the Worlds would obviously "go together" in that they're all using speculative fiction to explore the human condition. The Awakening, The Bell Jar, Wuthering Heights, P&P, Little Women, and maybe The Scarlet Letter could be exploring women in fiction. Honestly, you could just have one semester of the first theme, one of the second. Or you could get less obvious... Of Mice and Men and P&P explore friendship. Macbeth, P&P, The Awakening all explore marriage. Dracula, Macbeth, Frankenstein all explore villains. Gatsby, Death of a Salesman... antiheroes. I could go on like this...

In terms of output... If she hasn't written much lit analysis, I'd do that for some books. Just look up essay topics. Or even compare and contrast for books. She could do some creative stuff for a book - write an alternate ending, write a letter in the voice of a character, etc. That sort of thing. She could do book reviews. She could write a book guide. She could make a video. You could find a set of short essay questions for some books and assign those.

THANK YOU!

Well, what I meant by "light" was not much output.  She loves, loves, LOVES to read!  She said she wants to start as soon as APs are done. 🙂 And she has felt too bogged down with English this year.  She has done a ton of analysis. I like your ideas of alternate output for grading.  She is sad that she has "missed" so many must reads.(in her mind, Ha)  I told her I would read with her and discuss.  Well, I will try!  I am not opposed to cutting some books if we run out of time and we will group them at the end.  Yes, I agree we need a little more organization with our list. Grouping books together on theme is a great idea.  I never thought of that.

She asked to read The Jungle.  She has always meant to and it didn't happen. I agree about Uncle Tom's Cabin, but I'm still glad I read it.  Can't believe she hasn't read P&P!  

I haven't read War of the Worlds.  But, we have it. That's why it made the list. I will consider switching it out for another Wells.

Diversity-yes, I agree.  I will look at your suggestions!

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If the goal is light in terms of output but not reading, then I'd maybe just have her keep a journal for her books. How about two response entries per book? You could have standard questions. One could be something like pick a quote that you feel was an essential quote from the book, discuss it, explain the meaning, your reaction, and why it's so important. Things like that.

I definitely would add more diversity to the list if you can. Maybe arrange it by 2-4 themes from what you have there and then very purposefully pick a non-white or non-Western lit author to add to the mix on that same theme.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...