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DawnM

What is something you grew up being served that you hate to eat or won't eat?

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Split pea soup, cream of mushroom soup.

I hated scalloped potatoes (and ham.... I hated it when dinner was ham and scalloped potatoes!), but I like scalloped potatoes now.

 

When I was growing up, most of my friends had to eat liver and onions about once a week...  it really seemed to be a thing.  I was so fortunate because my parents NEVER made it.   Turns out....  my dad bought our 'hamburger meat' at a butcher, and had a special formula.  I'm not sure the exact ratio, but it was something like 5% kidney, and 20% liver.  So we got that extra iron or whatever nutrition with almost every meal... And it didn't give it that horrid taste.  (I did it a few times as an adult.  Works great.... unless you thaw it in the microwave.   I don't know why, but that makes that horrid liver smell and taste permeate everything!

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7 minutes ago, Corraleno said:

I think its hilarious that almost every "worst childhood food" list includes some variation of jello salad. My mother's version was shredded red and green cabbage, grated carrots, cucumber chunks (including skin and seeds), and crushed pineapple, in a matrix of lime jello mixed with cole slaw dressing and left to set. The combination of dressing and green jello created a translucent mucus effect. We (kids) called it "Dumpster Wiggle."

Vegetables were almost always canned: lima beans, wax beans, green beans, and, for special occasions, canned asparagus that was cooked into slimy gray mush. The "meat" was worse: lots of frozen "veal cutlets" covered in orange cornflake crumbs and gray "minute steaks" with the texture of shoe leather. If we chewed a piece for more than a few minutes and still couldn't swallow it, we'd discreetly spit it into a napkin and then slip it under the table to the dog. My little brother was always blowing our cover though because he'd take too big of a bite and then the dog would choke on it, so my mom would put the dog out. Then we'd be forced to store any pieces of inedible gristle in our cheeks until we could be excused to go to the bathroom, where we'd spit it in the toilet.

Anyone remember canned "chow mien"? It came in a big can with a little can taped to the top that contained fried noodles. The "chow mien" itself was about 90% celery in a slimy green sauce the color and consistency of snot. It was served over white Minute Rice. Gag.

Dessert, if we had any, was usually canned "fruit cocktail" or canned peaches. My school lunches were usually either jelly sandwiches or lettuce and mayo on white bread, with a thermos full of Kool Aid. So nutritious. 🙄

I remember that canned chow mien nastiness.  It smelled and looked like it vomit to me.  And my mom loved it.  I praised the grocery store near us that stopped carrying it for some reason.  

I didn’t know until I was older what properly cooked brussel sprouts were.  My mother used to make “Swedish” meatballs often and I still can’t stand it.  I have no idea what exactly is in hers but let me say that ikea’s version is not hers.  Her version has some nasty gravy that you can’t figure out exactly what is in it,served over noodles.  Add her scalloped potatoes from a box along with hamburger helper.  I can’t stand those either.  

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1 hour ago, MercyA said:

God bless my mother; she never made me eat anything I didn't like. ❤️

But there were some things she served that I still won't eat: peas, squash, sweet potatoes, cooked cabbage, and PB&J (just PB or just J, please!) At Christmas, I couldn't stomach her rum balls or the gifted fruitcake with the fake little pieces of fruit in it.

I don't understand all the hate toward meatloaves. I'm a vegetarian now, but I'd love a good veggie loaf. It's a comfort food to me, like mac & cheese. 

I love my mom’s meatloaf but won’t eat most others.  My mom would make a tomato gravy that used canned diced tomatoes, seasonings, onions and cooking juices from the meatloaf.  The first time I saw a meatloaf with a ketchup based sauce I was so confused.  

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Canned green beans....well any canned vegetables. 

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Campbell's chicken noodle soup and tuna fish sandwiches, served with milk.  Gag. 

My father is not an adventurous eater, (he eyes white rice suspiciously), so a can of chicken noodle soup with half of a tuna sandwich is what he calls "Good Eats".  For desert, you can have an Oreo or two with milk.  He still offers me this when I visit him, and actively tries to discourage going to a restaurant because "I can just make us some soup and tuna fish sandwiches.  Maybe an Oreo or two after.  How about that?"  Ugh, no!  As a kid, I complained it was like eating in post-War Germany.   

To this day, I hate all of it.  Ironically, I craved chicken noodle soup while pregnant and ate it by the gallon, but never the slop from a can, only home made.   

 

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Liver and onions. Both of my parents loved it, and I hated it. 

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6 hours ago, whitehawk said:

Fortunately, meatloaf was not served very often. I have never made it as an adult.

I  grew up with typical meatloaf and never really cared for it. I decided to give it another try as an adult and after trying a number of recipes have come up with both turkey and hamburger recipes we really liked. The hamburger one has veggies mixed in which makes the flavors a lot more complex. I'm pleasantly surprised.

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48 minutes ago, scoutingmom said:

Split pea soup, cream of mushroom soup.

I hated scalloped potatoes (and ham.... I hated it when dinner was ham and scalloped potatoes!), but I like scalloped potatoes now.

 

When I was growing up, most of my friends had to eat liver and onions about once a week...  it really seemed to be a thing.  I was so fortunate because my parents NEVER made it.   Turns out....  my dad bought our 'hamburger meat' at a butcher, and had a special formula.  I'm not sure the exact ratio, but it was something like 5% kidney, and 20% liver.  So we got that extra iron or whatever nutrition with almost every meal... And it didn't give it that horrid taste.  (I did it a few times as an adult.  Works great.... unless you thaw it in the microwave.   I don't know why, but that makes that horrid liver smell and taste permeate everything!

Liver was really, really cheap. I'm sure that's why it was routine  at our house.

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2 hours ago, MercyA said:

God bless my mother; she never made me eat anything I didn't like. ❤️

But there were some things she served that I still won't eat: peas, squash, sweet potatoes, cooked cabbage, and PB&J (just PB or just J, please!) At Christmas, I couldn't stomach her rum balls or the gifted fruitcake with the fake little pieces of fruit in it.

I don't understand all the hate toward meatloaves. I'm a vegetarian now, but I'd love a good veggie loaf. It's a comfort food to me, like mac & cheese. 

Overcooked, dry, salty meatloaf was standard fare at my house.

Now rum balls are another story. I loved those, as do my kids.But I'm the only fruitcake eater.

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My father cared more about alcohol than keeping a job or caring for his kids. Because of that, my mom had to work extra hours and we had to hope that our father would remember to feed us. The usual dinners were frozen pot pies, sausage links and eggs, or ham and bean soup. To this day I can’t eat any of them. I can do homemade pot pie, but the thought of a frozen one...yuck. 

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57 minutes ago, happysmileylady said:

I love my mom’s meatloaf but won’t eat most others.  My mom would make a tomato gravy that used canned diced tomatoes, seasonings, onions and cooking juices from the meatloaf.  The first time I saw a meatloaf with a ketchup based sauce I was so confused.  

 

Our family loves our meatloaf, but will NOT eat it anywhere else. 

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This thread reminded me of this hilarious YouTube video.  DH has called her "The Jello Lady" ever since.

 

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10 hours ago, Lady Florida. said:

My mom was a good cook but she's from a generation when commercially canned food was a new and convenient thing, especially since we were city dwellers. The only things I wouldn't eat today that she used to serve are Campbell's soups and some canned vegetables. In her later years she got away from that, but when she was a single working mother, that convenience was a big help to her.

The main dishes she cooked were always good. 

Mine as well.  All the stuff she used that I don't are -- Minute Rice (!!!), instant mashed potatoes, hot dogs, every canned vegetable under the sun -- fall into the category of new and/or convenient foods.  

But what lured me into this thread is...

7 hours ago, MrsMommy said:

Lima beans. I have always hated them. And sometimes, we had them on Christmas, and I wasn't allowed to leave the table until I ate them. On CHRISTMAS, for cryin' out loud! I will never make them. I will never eat them. And I certainly will never make my children eat them!

OK, I'm better now. 😉 

Oh my word lima beans.  No child of mine has ever seen a lima bean.

 

 

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11 hours ago, lavender's green said:

Some dish my mom called "sh!t on a shingle." Toast with a nasty salty white chunky gravy plopped on top.

 

Ha, we used to have that too, I remember that name!  Also known as 'chipped beef', but I wonder to this day what kind of meat it really was, or if it was real at all.  My mom would make it out of 2 small packages and slice it up.  

City chicken anyone?  Again, what kind of meat was that?  It was on a popsicle stick!

And pickle and bologna sandwiches, no thank you!  

Gosh, what our parents did to make the food bill stretch.  I must admit, idk how they did it with such a large family.  However, I do love a good pot of simmering pinto beans!  

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Okay, I'm going to buck the trend and say that one of my FAVORITE childhood holiday dishes was the esteemed "Pink Salad." Raspberry or strawberry jello, mayo, cream cheese, crushed pineapple, Cool Whip, and walnuts, whipped up into a "fluff" and chilled. I still can eat massive quantities of it if I let myself. If I know my mom is going to make it, I'll sometimes pass along some vegan, dye-free gelatin. 

And my grandma's red jello, with mandarin oranges, pineapple, grapes, bananas, and sometimes (I think) mini-marshmallows suspended in it, topped with Cool Whip. Lovely. 🙂 

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2 hours ago, ***** said:

 

Ha, we used to have that too, I remember that name!  Also known as 'chipped beef', but I wonder to this day what kind of meat it really was, or if it was real at all.  My mom would make it out of 2 small packages and slice it up.  

My mom made chipped beef on toast.  The meat was a stack of slices rolled up in a jar; she cut it into strips with kitchen shears.  The gravy... no idea what it was made of.  I liked chipped beef on toast.  Probably because it was already cooked and thus couldn't be overcooked into dryness.

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Patties made from canned salmon. 

Boiled carrots. 

Cottage cheese on iceberg lettuce with some kind of canned fruit. 

Baked beans with biscuits on top. 

Spaghetti with hamburger. 

Waffles with raisins and nuts. 

Banana and iceberg lettuce salad, with mayonnaise as the dressing.  No no no !!!!

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1 hour ago, TrixieB said:

My mom made chipped beef on toast.  The meat was a stack of slices rolled up in a jar; she cut it into strips with kitchen shears.  The gravy... no idea what it was made of.  I liked chipped beef on toast.  Probably because it was already cooked and thus couldn't be overcooked into dryness.

I love this when it’s made with leftover turkey and white gravy on toast.  It’s pretty much the only way I like turkey that isn’t in deli meat form. 

 

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3 hours ago, MercyA said:

Okay, I'm going to buck the trend and say that one of my FAVORITE childhood holiday dishes was the esteemed "Pink Salad." Raspberry or strawberry jello, mayo, cream cheese, crushed pineapple, Cool Whip, and walnuts, whipped up into a "fluff" and chilled. I still can eat massive quantities of it if I let myself. If I know my mom is going to make it, I'll sometimes pass along some vegan, dye-free gelatin. 

And my grandma's red jello, with mandarin oranges, pineapple, grapes, bananas, and sometimes (I think) mini-marshmallows suspended in it, topped with Cool Whip. Lovely. 🙂 

My mom makes this with cranberries put through a grinder along with chopped celery, apples and walnuts.  I can not stand the texture.  I like just jello and marshmallows.  I used to help her make it so I could steal a mug of hot liquid strawberry jello with no stuff in it, and melt some marshmallows into it ....  I drank it like cocoa 😂 

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6 hours ago, Corraleno said:

Anyone remember canned "chow mien"? It came in a big can with a little can taped to the top that contained fried noodles. The "chow mien" itself was about 90% celery in a slimy green sauce the color and consistency of snot. It was served over white Minute Rice. Gag.

 

I think they still sell that.  You can definitely buy canned chop suey vegetables 😬

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Oh, my parents bought this big bag of TVP, textured vegetable protein. It was dehydrated, probably soya. If the synthetic taste was bad, the texture was worse. Even my frugal mother didn't finish the bag. I mostly cook vegetarian now, but that was vile.

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TVP is usable if you grind it up very small, soak it in broth, and mix it with a lot of stuff - a little goes a long way in spaghetti sauce or chili.

Otherwise, I must say, it's cardboard. High fiber cardboard, yes, and with lots of protein, but cardboard nonetheless.

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10 hours ago, tbog said:

My father cared more about alcohol than keeping a job or caring for his kids. Because of that, my mom had to work extra hours and we had to hope that our father would remember to feed us. The usual dinners were frozen pot pies, sausage links and eggs, or ham and bean soup. To this day I can’t eat any of them. I can do homemade pot pie, but the thought of a frozen one...yuck. 

 

My mother abused prescription drugs and had mental health issues, so we ate a lot of frozen pot pies, TV dinners in foil trays, and boxed mac-and-cheese. I've always stayed far away. We ate a lot of scrambled eggs, but for some reason they never bothered me. 

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14 hours ago, DesertBlossom said:

I feel like the theme of this thread is poor quality foods like canned vegetables and convenience foods that were common in the 70s and 80s. And overcooked vegetables. I think convenience foods have improved a lot, and internet access to a billion recipes and their reviews have seriously improved our dinners in America. Because most of these hated foods I don't *think* people eat much anymore.

The first time I made posole DH was rather skeptical because his only experience with hominy was plain. Like straight out of a can. I don't know where she got it or why his mom had it, but she didn't know what to with it. That would definitely scare a kid away from it.

I had exactly this experience. My mom made hominy once in a while, probably for “variety”, but it was poured from a can and warmed up. So yucky! 

I had posole last year; my BIL made it. It was delicious! But I definitely remembered my experience of “hominy” from childhood. 

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12 hours ago, Corraleno said:

I think its hilarious that almost every "worst childhood food" list includes some variation of jello salad. My mother's version was shredded red and green cabbage, grated carrots, cucumber chunks (including skin and seeds), and crushed pineapple, in a matrix of lime jello mixed with cole slaw dressing and left to set. The combination of dressing and green jello created a translucent mucus effect. We (kids) called it "Dumpster Wiggle."

Vegetables were almost always canned: lima beans, wax beans, green beans, and, for special occasions, canned asparagus that was cooked into slimy gray mush. The "meat" was worse: lots of frozen "veal cutlets" covered in orange cornflake crumbs and gray "minute steaks" with the texture of shoe leather. If we chewed a piece for more than a few minutes and still couldn't swallow it, we'd discreetly spit it into a napkin and then slip it under the table to the dog. My little brother was always blowing our cover though because he'd take too big of a bite and then the dog would choke on it, so my mom would put the dog out. Then we'd be forced to store any pieces of inedible gristle in our cheeks until we could be excused to go to the bathroom, where we'd spit it in the toilet.

Anyone remember canned "chow mien"? It came in a big can with a little can taped to the top that contained fried noodles. The "chow mien" itself was about 90% celery in a slimy green sauce the color and consistency of snot. It was served over white Minute Rice. Gag.

Dessert, if we had any, was usually canned "fruit cocktail" or canned peaches. My school lunches were usually either jelly sandwiches or lettuce and mayo on white bread, with a thermos full of Kool Aid. So nutritious. 🙄

My mom made this very often and yes, always with Minute Rice. It seems so silly now, but when I was dating dh, I watched his mother make a chicken stir fry not-from-a-LaChoy-can. I was fascinated! It never ocurred to me that one could make a (far superior) homemade version of the “chow mein” my mother had served umpteen times. And with cooked rice! Now, homemade stir fries are a staple in our family dinners, and using those LaChoy cans seems unimaginable. 

I also LOL at “fruit cocktail” and a thermos full of Kool aid! If you got a “cherry” in the fruit cocktail, you were lucky! 

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Spaghetti.  I can’t eat it because of reflux, but even if I could, just... no.  We had it 2-3x a week growing up, and I have cleaned up too many toddler “red sauce vomit” sessions for pasta to be appetizing in any way.  Plus, I have one kid that smells like old spaghetti when he’s sick.  I do occasionally let the kids eat it, but I don’t sleep well that night and often wake up multiple times in a panic hearing “phantom gagging”.

I must be the only person in the world who really likes canned green beans.  Definitely better than frozen (rubber, *gag*), and I have trouble chewing fresh ones unless they are cooked into a pulp.  We didn’t have them growing up because my mom hated every vegetable except russet potatoes and iceberg lettuce.

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I think it's interesting that a lot of us had mothers who were good cooks, but we just didn't like the food that was popular at the time:  jello salads with weird stuff in them, over-cooked veggies (mostly frozen peas and corn), tuna casserole, etc.   I grew up not enjoying food.  I only ate it because I got hungry and I knew the only thing to satisfy that was to eat.  I didn't learn to actually enjoy food until I hit middle age!  That was when I finally learned different ways of cooking:  fresh vegetables roasted with olive oil; lots of different flavors -- like fresh herbs and fresh-squeezed lemon juice and lemon zest; savory mashed sweet potatoes; meat served in ways other than in casseroles with mushroom soup sauce;  flavorful stews with lots of vegetables and legumes...  

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I will admit it, I sometimes eat the La Choy "chow mein" as a lunch.  But....it's not "green"?  And the top can is the sauce, it doesn't come with chow mein noodles?   I only get the beef one though.  Maybe I am thinking of a different product?  I do eat it with Minute rice too.  But, that's because it's lunch and lunch tends to be junky, plus, my kids don't eat any of that sort of stuff (wouldn't even eat it if it was homemade, they are super opposed to ANY sauce lol) I don't want to take the time to make up a whole batch of regular rice if I am the only one eating it.   I also tend to doctor it up a bit with regular veggies, and sometimes leftover meat, plus I buy separate chow mein noodles for it.  

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Oh, and I also do butter on a sandwich.  But, only one specific sandwich.  Cold leftover Thanksgiving turkey sandwich.  And that's the only stuff on it...cold leftover Thanksgiving turkey and butter.  

But, normally, I don't want any sort of condiment on my sandwiches.  No mayo, mustard, dressing, anything.  Even on burgers, I would much rather just have some lettuce, tomatoes and pickles.  

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12 hours ago, peacelovehomeschooling said:

Soggy sandwiches.


Preach it.
My daughter used to think sandwiches were a HUGE treat because I made so few of them.

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3 minutes ago, happysmileylady said:

Oh, and I also do butter on a sandwich.  But, only one specific sandwich.  Cold leftover Thanksgiving turkey sandwich.  And that's the only stuff on it...cold leftover Thanksgiving turkey and butter.  

But, normally, I don't want any sort of condiment on my sandwiches.  No mayo, mustard, dressing, anything.  Even on burgers, I would much rather just have some lettuce, tomatoes and pickles.  

Yes!  And a little salt and pepper. 

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4 minutes ago, J-rap said:

Yes!  And a little salt and pepper. 

I don't even do the salt and pepper, but DH brines the turkey so it tends to have enough salt anyway 🙂

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I wonder if I'm the only person in the U.S. whose mother never once made a jello salad. Was it because she was a busy working single mother? She just made plain jello and put it in the fridge. The end. She never, ever put anything in it and only occasionally added whipped cream on top when serving it.  Dh's mother made weird jello salads and we're only 2 years apart, so I don't think it's my age. 

Edited by Lady Florida.
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On 4/21/2019 at 1:12 PM, Dotwithaperiod said:

My dad gave us creamed corn once while my mom was in the hospital. I threw up at the table.

Ugh. I forgot about creamed corn. Our poor people dinner was something we called "corn on bread", and that's exactly what it was. A slice of white bread (Wonder of course), butter, covered with creamed corn. My brother and I actually loved it and didn't realize it was served because the money was low. Even thinking about it now makes me gag but I'm sure my mother was glad we liked it at the time.

17 hours ago, Corraleno said:

 

Anyone remember canned "chow mien"? It came in a big can with a little can taped to the top that contained fried noodles. The "chow mien" itself was about 90% celery in a slimy green sauce the color and consistency of snot. It was served over white Minute Rice. Gag.

Dessert, if we had any, was usually canned "fruit cocktail" or canned peaches. My school lunches were usually either jelly sandwiches or lettuce and mayo on white bread, with a thermos full of Kool Aid. So nutritious. 🙄

I ate all of those things as a kid and liked them at the time. My brother and I used to fight over who got more juice from the canned peaches or fruit cocktail.  It was only in adulthood that I realized how yucky they were and wouldn't touch them (and certainly not serve them to my family) now. 

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21 minutes ago, Lady Florida. said:

I wonder if I'm the only person in the U.S. whose mother never once made a jello salad. Was it because she was a busy working single mother? She just made plain jello and put it in the fridge. The end. She never, ever put anything in it and only occasionally added whipped cream on top when serving it.  Dh's mother made weird jello salads and we're only 2 years apart, so I don't think it's my age. 

My mom never made "weird" jello salads, but she would occasionally put fruit in Jello, like berries or something.  But not weird stuff like mayo or cottage cheese or whatever.  She would also make some Jello based desserts, like this sort of flag thing

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I have to say that most of these hated foods sound pretty awful. But should I be embarrassed to admit that I have had a lot of Jello salads that were actually really good? I have heard that Utah is the Jello capital of the US. Maybe Mormons just know how to do Jello salads better than others? 😊(Disclaimer: I am not from Utah, but I am LDS.)

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14 hours ago, TrixieB said:

My mom made chipped beef on toast.  The meat was a stack of slices rolled up in a jar; she cut it into strips with kitchen shears.  The gravy... no idea what it was made of.  I liked chipped beef on toast.  Probably because it was already cooked and thus couldn't be overcooked into dryness.

 

Oh gosh!  I was taught how to make this in 7th grade home ec class.  It was my mother's favorite dish for a while because it meant I could make it!  It was made with this:

https://www.amazon.com/Hormel-Beef-Dried-Sliced-2-5/dp/B00CHTSEZA/ref=asc_df_B00CHTSEZA/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=242041040570&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=12749968776374724044&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9009968&hvtargid=pla-664834801831&psc=1

I haven 't thought about that in YEARS.

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13 minutes ago, DesertBlossom said:

I have to say that most of these hated foods sound pretty awful. But should I be embarrassed to admit that I have had a lot of Jello salads that were actually really good? I have heard that Utah is the Jello capital of the US. Maybe Mormons just know how to do Jello salads better than others? 😊(Disclaimer: I am not from Utah, but I am LDS.)

 

It has jello, that is all I need to know.  Blech!

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Canned peas. My kids like them, so I serve them, but I don’t eat them.

Bland Mexican-style casserole. I can’t even remember exactly what was in it.

any sandwich on store bought white bread. Even as a kid I’d beg her to buy wheat bread but my dad didn’t like it.

Fried bologna. To be fair, even my mom didn’t like this. But my dad took it in his lunches sometimes, and if I was going with him, so did I.

Bologna of any kind.

Grilled cheese made with velveeta. As a kid I preferred it to cheddar, so mom made it, but now I wouldn’t eat it. I had bad taste as a child, what can I say.

my mom is not a bad cook. But my dad has very bland and unadventurous taste, and she cooked to suit him. Now, a family friend is a bad and unenthusiastic cook. She served her kids what she called “chicken goop”, which was chicken cooked in stewed tomatoes served over white bread. I know her son won’t ever eat that again.

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15 minutes ago, DawnM said:

 

It has jello, that is all I need to know.  Blech!

😅 

ETA: I don't feel like it has any nutritional value whatsoever. I have never made any kind of Jello salad just for us for dinner at home. I have, rarely, made it for large family dinners. And almost all the good Jello salads contain lots of cool whip and fruit and should really be called dessert instead if a side dish/salad.

Edited by DesertBlossom
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2 hours ago, Homeschool Mom in AZ said:

pimento cheese sandwhiches

 

😮I love pimento cheese!

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17 hours ago, ***** said:

 

City chicken anyone?  Again, what kind of meat was that?  It was on a popsicle stick!

Yes, city chicken! Ugh! My mom served it as a “treat”.  No one else seems to remember City chicken.

Overall my mom was a pretty good cook.  She avoided most convenience foods popular at the time.  There are things she made that I wouldn’t cook now, but they weren’t bad.  One of her side dishes was a can of cream of mushroom soup, a can of water, and a can of Minute rice baked until soft.  It was a bit mushy but not bad, but I can’t even imagine making it for my kids.  Times and tastes change.

Fortunately no one ever subjected me to jello salad with any kind of vegetable or dressing in it.  *shudder* I saw them at potlucks but no one in my family made them.

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9 hours ago, DesertBlossom said:

I have to say that most of these hated foods sound pretty awful. But should I be embarrassed to admit that I have had a lot of Jello salads that were actually really good? I have heard that Utah is the Jello capital of the US. Maybe Mormons just know how to do Jello salads better than others? 😊(Disclaimer: I am not from Utah, but I am LDS.)

My grandmother wasn't LDS,  but her Jello Party Salad from a 1950s ladies' magazine was legendary.  It's affectionately known as "Green Stuff." The mix of green jello, cream cheese and pineapple bits is so good my family members still demand it at every holiday meal.  When they moved out of their house my brother and I spent an solid hour and a half trying to find the original recipe (I had scrawled on it with a pen as a toddler) so my brother could frame it and put it on his wall. Grandmother had it memorized so it wasn't easy to find. When it was time to divide up their stuff the grandkids were asked what they wanted.  I wanted their nativity set of olive wood they bought in Israel and the rocking chair they bought when my mother was born. Forget the silver, I don't need another chore.  My brother wanted the original jello mold pan she used for the jello salad.  My mother decided to update the recipe with cherries on top which  has created a divide between the jello traditionalists and jello progressives within the family. The debate rages on every Thanksgiving, Christmas, Easter, Mother's Day, Father's Day, graduation....

Edited by Homeschool Mom in AZ
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1 hour ago, DawnM said:

 

😮I love pimento cheese!

Me, too. Real pimento cheese, stuffed in a jalapeño, with a tiny bit of chipotle sauce, wrapped with bacon.

Or with white bread, lol. 

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1 hour ago, DesertBlossom said:

😅

ETA: I don't feel like it has any nutritional value whatsoever. I have never made any kind of Jello salad just for us for dinner at home. I have, rarely, made it for large family dinners. And almost all the good Jello salads contain lots of cool whip and fruit and should really be called dessert instead if a side dish/salad.

I have no problem with jello in dessert form, but you’ve really crossed the line if you add mayo or cheese or the flesh of an animal, or Spam!

I remember a donut shop that a neighbor worked at. She’d bring us these brownish glazed ones with nut sprinkled over.  I think they were maple, but the smell of them nearly killed me. That smell, and one other, I was able to recall easily years later, and I’d use it to claim I was sick and needed to stay home from school; I could think about it and throw up on demand. And now after all these posts of mine, I realize that I probably was a very picky eater,  but affected more by texture and smell.  It never dawned on me before.

Edited by Dotwithaperiod

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19 hours ago, ***** said:
 
 
 
18 hours ago, ***** said:

 

City chicken anyone?  Again, what kind of meat was that?  It was on a popsicle stick!

  

 

I'm fairly certain city chicken is pork.  We ate it when I was growing up.  It was reserved for special occasions...lol!

Tuna tetrazzini ... YUCK, YUCK, YUCK!!!

It was canned tuna, overcooked spaghetti noodles, canned sliced green olives mixed and an unbelievable amount of cream of mushroom soup dumped into a casserole dish and baked.

Everyone in the entire extended family raved about it.  Extras were always made so that everyone could have leftovers to take with them to eat during the week.  Did I mention, "Yuck!"?  Well, it isn't any better the following days either!

 

Also on my list is sauerkraut.  Not only won't I make it, I will not allow it in my house.  Relatives have tested me on this rule, but I will not waiver.  They must leave it in their vehicle.  The mere smell will have me heaving for hours.  

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