Menu
Jump to content

What's with the ads?

ByeByeMartha

Bible/scripture question

Recommended Posts

A Christian I know seems to detest the poem "Footprints in the Sand." I've heard this person mention it many times over the years and has also said to a group of us, "If you have that hanging in your house and invite me over, you better take it down before I get there." I realize it's not scripture directly from the Bible, but I've never heard anyone who disliked it other than this person. This person is well versed in Biblical theology but I'm not convinced their dislike is bc it's not from the Bible.  I have a hunch why this person may not like it but no one in our group would dare ask bc of this person's status in the community. Why do you suppose someone would seem to have such disdain for that poem? Perhaps my hunch is wrong and I haven't considered other possibilities. Thank you for sharing your opinion. 🙂

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Her demand people take it down before she comes over,  is over the top.   It's extremely rude.  And no one is forcing her to read it  

 

That said.. I don't like it.   It makes me cringe.  I consider it to trivialize struggle.  I do not consider it helpful in offering either comfort in adversity or contributing to build faith.

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, gardenmom5 said:

Her demand people take it down before she comes over,  is over the top.   It's extremely rude.  And no one is forcing her to read it  

 

That said.. I don't like it.   It makes me cringe.  I consider it to trivialize struggle.  I do not consider it helpful in offering either comfort in adversity or contributing to build faith.

 

See, I figured this person was a male. And that they shouldn't go visit other people if what other people have on their walls is that personally triggering.

I find the poem overdone, but it does not make me cringe. Just overused.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, vonfirmath said:

 

See, I figured this person was a male. And that they shouldn't go visit other people if what other people have on their walls is that personally triggering.

I find the poem overdone, but it does not make me cringe. Just overused.

why would you assume they were male?  I've encountered far more women to make such demands of how other people run their own homes than men.

I agree, if what someone else has on their wall is triggering - don't go visit.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, ByeByeMartha said:

A Christian I know seems to detest the poem "Footprints in the Sand." I've heard this person mention it many times over the years and has also said to a group of us, "If you have that hanging in your house and invite me over, you better take it down before I get there." I realize it's not scripture directly from the Bible, but I've never heard anyone who disliked it other than this person. This person is well versed in Biblical theology but I'm not convinced their dislike is bc it's not from the Bible.  I have a hunch why this person may not like it but no one in our group would dare ask bc of this person's status in the community. Why do you suppose someone would seem to have such disdain for that poem? Perhaps my hunch is wrong and I haven't considered other possibilities. Thank you for sharing your opinion. 🙂

 

The Bible is full of exhortations for Christians to "stand." Ephesians 6:10-17; Romans 14:4; Exodus 14:13; 2 Chronicles 20:9; Isaiah 7:9;  several verses in Job about him standing in his faith. Maybe that is where this person is coming from? 

Bible verses that show that God does indeed carry us at times: Isaiah 40:11; Isaiah 63:9; Deuteronomy 1:31; Isaiah 46:4

I think it's a sappy poem, but I also think that these verses back up the idea that when we cannot go in our own strength, Jesus does enable us to continue on thorough our faith in Him.

I want to take a moment to address this phrase from your post  "no one in our group would dare ask bc of this person's status in the community."

Please know that no one is ever above question. God created us as equals before Him. The Holy Spirit that teaches this person, teaches each of us the very same truth. God doesn't play favorites. You have equal authority as this other person does before God. Whatever that person's status in the community that makes him/her unquestionable, it is a status conferred by men, not God. No person is above question. It is thinking that someone is above being questioned opens the door to allow abuse, and that abuse can be spiritual, emotional or physical in nature. When people are above question, they have too much power over those who want to ask them questions. Please think carefully about the nature of this faith community. You should not ever be in a position where you think you cannot question someone.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think there is anything wrong theologically with the poem.  I agree with others who find it overly sentimental. I just don't like it. I would not comment on it if it was up in someone's house and certainly wouldn't demand it be taken down and I find it ridiculous that anyone would do so.  I don't understand why someone's status in the community would prevent anyone from conversationally asking why the person has such a problem with the poem, particularly since (it sounds like from the OP) that the person has brought it up numerous times.  

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe I am reading too much between the lines, but I could see some (rather bombastic) pastors (or their wives) saying such hyperbolic things from the pulpit or Bible study.  In those cases it is part of a unhealthy culture of a pastor thinking that they can meddle in people's lives and choices based on their own choices.  While we all interact with actual Scripture on our own and apply it to our own circumstances based on our own personalities and likes and dislikes, people like this seem to think that everyone should be cookie-cutter cutouts of them and their family.  They don't realize that there is a difference between doctrine (Christian truths) and application.  Artwork/ Poetry like "Footprints in the Sand" is definitely in the application category and means different things to different people - to some it is hugely inspiring and comforting; to others it is not. 

(Not picking on pastors or pastor's wives.  I am a pastor's wife.  But as a pastor's wife I have seen a lot of different church dynamics up close and personal.) 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, ByeByeMartha said:

... but no one in our group would dare ask bc of this person's status in the community.  🙂

What country and century are you living in that this is a thing? The modern western world isn't status or hierarchically ordered.  The only circumstance I can think of where someone in our time and country would view anything through the lens of status is cult. Is there a category I'm not aware of?  American culture, in general, is egalitarian.  We don't operate in a world where people are above being questioned.  I'm curious to know your location and religion/denomination now, but you're not obliged give that kind of information out.

Grown ups should be emotionally able to handle the fact that there are differences in people.  That poem is meaningful to some people. It's too sappy and simplistic for my personal tastes, but I can certainly manage to be at someone's house with it on the wall and not be the slightest bit bothered by it.  I go to the houses of Mormons that have Joseph Smith on the wall, and even though his theology contradicts mine on almost every major issue, I have accepted invitations to those homes without making any literal or figurative comments about them taking down those pictures. I don't roll my eyes when I see them either.  I had a Hindu neighbor who had pictures of some of her gods on the wall  at her house.  I never made comments about those either. The world doesn't accommodate our personal tastes.  It never has. It never will. Especially in someone else's home.  This is something we all manage to figure out by the time we're adults. Those who ignore this reality are delusional.

The person you're talking about is a serious piece of work who needs some sort of correction or rebuke for their attitude. 

Edited by Homeschool Mom in AZ
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, gardenmom5 said:

why would you assume they were male?  I've encountered far more women to make such demands of how other people run their own homes than men.

I agree, if what someone else has on their wall is triggering - don't go visit.

 

 

I mentioned it because I thought it was interesting you assumed female and I assumed male.  There was no indication given in the OP.

Maybe because it reminds me of a pastor of a church I belonged to.  I have thankfully not run into enough people that make demands of how other people run their lives to have a statistically significant sample.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Homeschool Mom in AZ said:

What country and century are you living in that this is a thing? The modern western world isn't status or hierarchically ordered.  The only circumstance I can think of where someone in our time and country would view anything through the lens of status is cult. Is there a category I'm not aware of?  American culture, in general, is egalitarian.  We don't operate in a world where people are above being questioned.  I'm curious to know your location and religion/denomination now, but you're not obliged give that kind of information out.

Grown ups should be emotionally able to handle the fact that there are differences in people.  That poem is meaningful to some people. It's too sappy and simplistic for my personal tastes, but I can certainly manage to be at someone's house with it on the wall and not be the slightest bit bothered by it.  I go to the houses of Mormons that have Joseph Smith on the wall, and even though his theology contradicts mine on almost every major issue, I have accepted invitations to those homes without making any literal or figurative comments about them taking down those pictures. I don't roll my eyes when I see them either.  I had a Hindu neighbor who had pictures of some of her gods on the wall  at her house.  I never made comments about those either. The world doesn't accommodate our personal tastes.  It never has. It never will. Especially in someone else's home.  This is something we all manage to figure out by the time we're adults. Those who ignore this reality are delusional.

The person you're talking about is a serious piece of work who needs some sort of correction or rebuke for their attitude. 

while modern western civilization isn't hierarchical - there are people who act like it is. (especially old biddies.)  and these are people acting completely outside the group of religion.  I've seen it in higher ed, as well as other places.

1 hour ago, vonfirmath said:

 

I mentioned it because I thought it was interesting you assumed female and I assumed male.  There was no indication given in the OP.

Maybe because it reminds me of a pastor of a church I belonged to.  I have thankfully not run into enough people that make demands of how other people run their lives to have a statistically significant sample.

 

the only man I can think of who has made such "you should do __ with your house" to me... Is my brother.  'tear down __ wall, move __ over there"  type stuff.   but he's well known for being odious. (and has a very fractious relationship with his adult children because of it.)

but I can think of  several (women) neighborhood busybodies I've met over the years...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, gardenmom5 said:

Her demand people take it down before she comes over,  is over the top.   It's extremely rude.  And no one is forcing her to read it  

 

That said.. I don't like it.   It makes me cringe.  I consider it to trivialize struggle.  I do not consider it helpful in offering either comfort in adversity or contributing to build faith.

This.  I used to find it comforting, until the real $#!% hit.  And anyone who would be offended by something I had up in my house (no Nazi or Confederate flags here) can just not come over.  

4 hours ago, Tiberia said:

My husband prefers the alternate version: "Buttprints in the Sand." (google it. It's funny.) Maybe she believes along those lines instead. Or you could giver her a framed copy of "Buttprints" to hang in her house.

 

http://www.wowzone.com/butt.htm

And this is even more trivializing and condescending to people who are suffering and doing everything in their power to walk in faith only to find themselves being swept away by a riptide ... yeah, Jesus is walking along the shore and I am getting pulled further and further out to sea.  No jetskis in sight.  Dory's encouragement to "just keep swimming" has worn me out.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...