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Attolia

Favorite Books/Resources?

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My kids are gifted but I have never taken it seriously.  My three oldest are doing great and pursuing their interests, etc so I don't feel too guilty but I do sometimes regret that I never challenged them more.  As my youngest finishes up fourth grade I am left wondering, what if?  What if I do challenge him rather than let him zip by so easily?  I see where he chooses to challenge himself sometimes but I never really challenge him within our curriculum. Yes, he is almost done with 6th grade math with a breeze (nothing new, nothing challenging).  I am not even sure what I am looking for?  I just know that it is all too easy for him. So, as I think of what to change, I would like to read up on this more.  

Do you have favorite books or resources on how to challenge gifted kids?  I am not looking for curriculum at this point.

  What sparked these thoughts was the email today from RFWP introducing the new book From Stress to Success.  I just made me wonder which resources ya'll appreciate most ❤️ 

Edited by Attolia

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There are a ton of fun ideas on the My Little Poppies blog, and I really like her gameschooling resources. I found the book Creative Homeschooling: A Guide for Smart Families helpful and interesting. There were bits I gleaned from Developing Math Talent.

When I'm lesson planning, I try to keep the subject matter interesting and relevant and present it in a way that will be most accessible for my students. I aim instruction so that we're working in or close to the zone of proximal development. If things are too easy, my kids get stressed. If they're too hard, they get stressed. It's a balancing act for sure.

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I enjoyed Classics in the Classroom by Michael Clay Thompson.  He makes a strong case for not just classics, but a LOT of them.  Very slim volume, very interesting read. https://www.amazon.com/Classics-Classroom-Michael-Thompson/dp/0880922206

I have also enjoyed Engaging Ideas, which discusses how the best way to learn is to develop high level papers that require deep critical thinking to write. You don't have to read the whole book, just the first half to really understand the importance of this approach to all humanities, social sciences, and sciences. It is basically writing across the curriculum, but focuses on how to design well-designed prompts to develop critical thinking. https://www.amazon.com/Engaging-Ideas-Professors-Integrating-Classroom/dp/0787902039

Ruth in NZ

Edited by lewelma
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I have never come across a resource that spelled it out, no.  Our method here is to move sideways or forward until we get to a sticking point.  I want my kids to learn how to struggle.  It sounds mean, but I want them to know how to push through something that feels hard so that when things inevitably are rough as a high schooler/adult, they know they can do it.  I didn't realise how much of a skill it was until I had to work on it myself.  My husband and I also realised that our youngest had never been told that he can't do something.  I mean, we have safety and moral/ethical limits in our parenting - but we have never told him he was too little to accomplish something or that it was was beyond his abilities.  He was always allowed to try.
I guess my very short book would be to throw and see what sticks, keep the difficulty level appropriate, and stand back to watch.  😄

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