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madteaparty

What does your 2/3 grader do indipendently?

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Mine is afterschooled, but we have nice chunks like a 15 day spring break, time after summer camp, a couple weeks with zero activities etc. she will likely be in school (in a foreign language) this fall and then home afterwards. I feel like I’m getting a lot done with her in the little shreds of time we have but it’s all completely hands on. I’m trying to extend the work time by a few minutes here and there (and rest my voice ;))—wondering what it is your kids do all by themselves for the handing over. She’s not the type the five a kumon worksheet and send her off 😉

so far I have beast online (though I have to keep an eye on that), some copywork, and some reading comprehension type sheets with multiple choice in the end. 

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I have a 3rd grader.  2nd, almost nothing was independent.  Even copywork and grammar had me involved at the beginning of the lesson and the end.  This year we have a few more workbook subjects.  He's able to complete those, his reading, and he prefers to do handwriting without my involvement except to go over it at the beginning and check it at the end.

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My current 2nd-grader is only beginning to do much at all independently. He can do copywork and math review problems as long as I am checking in frequently to make sure he's on task. He reads 15-20 minutes independently a book of his choice, if I make him. He enjoys logic puzzles and will work on them by himself, but still it's not unusual for him to ask me questions, so that's not 100% independent either. I just bought Grids for Kids for him and he likes those. I've also started giving him Math Stars newsletters a grade level or so behind, which encourages him to read the instructions and think through the problems on his own without expecting me to explain things.

What about trying more play-based or project activities, like Lego building challenges, snap circuits, Kiwi Crates? My ds will do all of those by himself.

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Similar to previous posters -- not a lot could be done independently at our house in 2nd grade Things that our DSs did solo at that age where mostly supplements, NOT core schoolwork:

multiple subjects = 30-minute turn for an educational computer game or educational TV show
Reading = 10-15 minutes of solo reading from choice of book from the book basket (all books were BELOW comfortable reading level)
Read-Aloud = listen to an audiobook
Math supplement = a manipulative + go-along booklet (although I was needed to get them started) -- geoboards, pattern blocks, multi-link cubes, cuisenaire rods
Science = exploring with a kit or project-based activity (some still required time/help from me)
Logic/Critical Thinking = mazes, hidden picture puzzles, extremely simple word search puzzles, and other beginning level critical thinking puzzle pages
Art = page from the Big Yellow Drawing Book -- or, a page of Mark Kistler's Draw Squad (although I had to read the info on the page to get DSs started); also popular with DSs were the Freddie Levin 1-2-3 Draw! series; other children really like the Draw-Write-Now series


What about hand-crafts? Very basic learning to sew projects; loom weaving; pony bead projects (make animals kit, or projects, or jewelry kit). Learning to do Calligraphy? Make her own comic book?

Edited by Lori D.
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My second grader does independently (or, at least 95% independently):

- independent reading
- handwriting
- typing program
- Daily Grammar Easy Grams
- xtramath
- Evan Moor Daily Word Problems
- Hands on Equations app
- Quizlet
- piano practice
- app to practice music note reading


 

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Hmmm, there's what my daughter COULD do independently, and what she chooses to do independently. She's a first grader, though, so I imagine she'll get more independent next year, but not a ton. 

What she does totally independently: she reads totally independently. She can also practice piano totally independently if she wants to, although it's best if she doesn't. She's also happy to do handwriting practice independently. 

What she tends to want input on: she likes to talk to me about her math or about any even vaguely creative writing she's doing. She probably could do these independently, but she really likes having input. 

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3 hours ago, Lori D. said:

Similar to previous posters -- not a lot could be done independently at our house in 2nd grade Things that our DSs did solo at that age where mostly supplements, NOT core schoolwork:

multiple subjects = 30-minute turn for an educational computer game or educational TV show
Reading = 10-15 minutes of solo reading from choice of book from the book basket (all books were BELOW comfortable reading level)
Read-Aloud = listen to an audiobook
Math supplement = a manipulative + go-along booklet (although I was needed to get them started) -- geoboards, pattern blocks, multi-link cubes, cuisenaire rods
Science = exploring with a kit or project-based activity (some still required time/help from me)
Logic/Critical Thinking = mazes, hidden picture puzzles, extremely simple word search puzzles, and other beginning level critical thinking puzzle pages
Art = page from the Big Yellow Drawing Book -- or, a page of Mark Kistler's Draw Squad (although I had to read the info on the page to get DSs started); also popular with DSs were the Freddie Levin 1-2-3 Draw! series; other children really like the Draw-Write-Now series


What about hand-crafts? Very basic learning to sew projects; loom weaving; pony bead projects (make animals kit, or projects, or jewelry kit). Learning to do Calligraphy? Make her own comic book?

I’m intrigued by this manipulative plus booklet you speak of. I always thought the manipulatives the most hands-on thing we do here, and since I don’t think that way (it wasn’t a thing when I grew up), we just don’t do them...

i bought her a magnetic tangram puzzle when overseas last month and one piece was lost within the first hour...That should tell all 😉

i’m not really looking for things for her to do. She can play indipendently for hours on end, just by her little self. I was hoping to extend a tiny bit the academic time...

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1 hour ago, madteaparty said:

I’m intrigued by this manipulative plus booklet you speak of. I always thought the manipulatives the most hands-on thing we do here, and since I don’t think that way (it wasn’t a thing when I grew up), we just don’t do them...

i bought her a magnetic tangram puzzle when overseas last month and one piece was lost within the first hour...That should tell all 😉

 


I was thinking of things like:
pattern blocks: Math Discoveries with Pattern Blocks; Pattern Block Book or Advanced Pattern Block BookTask Cards
geoboards: Primary Geoboard; Geoboard Activity Book for Primary GradesFlip and Draw Geoboard Patterns; Activity Cards
multi-link cubes: MathLink Cubes Activities (gr. K-2) or (gr. 3-6)
cuisenaire rods: Alphabet Book; Picture PuzzlesAddition & Subtraction

Or, do a quick search for free printable pages of activities to do with the manipulative of your choice. I used this sorts of resources and manipulatives as a supplemental short math time later in the day, or in place of the "spine" math program if one of our DSs "hit the wall" with a concept and needed to set it on the back burner for awhile and do something completely other.

But if it's not your thing, and not of interest to DD or quickly lost/discarded, then disregard the idea. 🙂
 

1 hour ago, madteaparty said:

I’m not really looking for things for her to do. She can play indipendently for hours on end, just by her little self. I was hoping to extend a tiny bit the academic time...


Hmmm... my suggestions were all things that we used to extend our academic time and develop critical thinking skills, but it sounds like you are looking for more formal/traditional school curricula. If that's the case, then perhaps something like  Miquon Math workbooks and cuisenaire rods as supplemental academics. Perhaps have her just use them discovery-style, along with the Education Unboxed free online videos?? Although that will probably still require some involvement by you for guidance or answering questions or making suggestions...

Or, perhaps  of the "Complete Book of..." series: ... Time and Money (gr. K-3); ... Math (gr. 1-2); ... Maps and Geography (gr. 3-6); ...Science (gr. 1-2) or (gr. 3-4)... 

BUT, those are workbooks, and you said in your first post that she's not the type for worksheets, AND you want it to be something she can do solo -- so I'm pretty much out of ideas for you now, lol. Hopefully someone else will chime in with what is a good fit for you and what you're looking for. BEST of luck! Warmly, Lori D.

Edited by Lori D.
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8 hours ago, Lori D. said:

Some of these are amazing, thank you!! I ordered all the things 😂

Edited by madteaparty
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I have an older first grader and we recently started a routine where I make him a list of four things to do independently each day. It's always piano practice, a workbook of various subjects (such as MP Writing, SSL, CTC, Daily Science) a computer website or app (such as BA Online, Duolingo) and something creative or experimental. I think the part that really makes it independent and keeps him on track is that I include everything he needs in one file folder. On the left I staple the weekly assignments (just the four independent things) broken down by day of week with big boxes to check upon completion. On the right side I staple, in order, any papers or instructions he needs labeled with day of week. I had started with six quick items daily (two computer things and two workbooks) but that was too much for his focus/attention span.

The last category is the hardest to find independent. He's been doing well with an AIMS unit which has spaces for recording experiment results and blank graphs and charts. Junior Analytical Grammar has been working for easy grammar review plus the occasional composition. A lot of times I'll just do a website search on a topic of interest and see what kind of free images I find. Or I'll just write on a blank paper my own instructions and perhaps a website for him to use. For instance, today he had a blank sheet that simply said to create an invitation to a magic show with a website for magic lessons for kids. But when it's a day with limited time I'll put only quick things.

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In 2nd...honestly, not much (but he has ADHD and honestly, probably some other stuff we are still figuring out).   By 3rd, he could do a little math by himself and some copywork. 

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With 6 kids some independance is necessary.  I start giving my kids daily checklists in 2nd grade, with a lot of handholding.  By 3rd I really do expect those items done by the end of the day (although I still CHECK every day).  By 6th grade I'm checking weekly (and they can move items around).

My current 3rd grader has:

Daily reading minutes (30)

Audiobook assignments 

Copywork

Piano practice

Latin review on Headventureland

Typing practice 

Chores

Hygene items like shower reminders

My older kids have done math facts review either by game, flash cards, or worksheets (he already knows his facts) or written narrations (he's not ready) at this age.  We had workbook spelling one year done mostly via checklist (it wasn't successful).

I'll also start them off onath or a writing project and write to finish it up.

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Last year, I started an assignment book for dd. The things on her list were typically:

Assigned reading

Cursive practice / copywork

Make Latin flashcards

Finish an art project

Practice recorder

Practice Tae Kwon Do

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