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Nicholas_mom

8th grade Foreign language include for High School??

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If it was of high school rigor, and if the student continued with the next level of the same language into high school, then yes. (example: did Spanish I in 8th grade and Spanish II in 9th grade)

If the student did not continue with that same foreign language in to high school, or more just "dabbled" in 8th grade and pretty much started over with the same foreign language in 9th grade, then no, I would not.

Edited by Lori D.
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Basically what Lori D. said. My ds is 8th grade this year, he is taking German 1 with high school level pacing at WTMA, and is continuing on to German II next year, so I am including it as high school work completed before 9th grade.

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1 hour ago, Nicholas_mom said:

He will continue the language into high school but will be lapse a couple of years.....


A lot of language gets lost with a gap, so it may just be easier to start over again in high school, and not worry about the 8th grade course -- i.e., just consider the 8th grade course an introduction or preview.

In looking at your signature, you've got a full load of courses and extracurriculars, and I imagine that will be the case for every year of high school, so it wouldn't be a big deal to not count the 8th grade Foreign Language. JMO! 🙂

Edited by Lori D.
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I have one of mine credit for her 8th grade year of Latin, and I didn't the next one.  Both continued in it. But the second one was not at a level ready to move onto Latin two at the end of 8th grade, so we continued but called 9th grade Latin 1. 

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From what other people in our state have said, in this state, you may list them on the transcript as high school classes taken in middle school, but you may NOT count them as part of the required high school credits.  I think that is ridiculous, but I asked about that a while ago in regards to language year 1 or algebra 1, and the consensus was that no, they could not count toward the required high school credits. A student who takes algebra 1 in 8th grade still needs 3 other math classes in high school to receive a diploma. (Yes, of course a bright student should easily take more math than that.)

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From what other people in our state have said, in this state, you may list them on the transcript as high school classes taken in middle school, but you may NOT count them as part of the required high school credits.  I think that is ridiculous, but I asked about that a while ago in regards to language year 1 or algebra 1, and the consensus was that no, they could not count toward the required high school credits. A student who takes algebra 1 in 8th grade still needs 3 other math classes in high school to receive a diploma. (Yes, of course a bright student should easily take more math than that.)

Oh!  I didn't think about our particular state.  Thanks for the reminder!

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I included Latin I that ds took in 8th grade on his transcript because it was high school level and he did respectably well on a standardised Latin test that I found online, so I knew that he had actually learned it. 🙂 

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In California, I believe the two only subjects for which you are allowed to take high school credit for work done in middle school are math and foreign language, provided they are high school level and are graded as such. At my daughter’s middle school, many kids came out with either or both math and foreign language high school credits.

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19 minutes ago, Mabelen said:

In California, I believe the two only subjects for which you are allowed to take high school credit for work done in middle school are math and foreign language, provided they are high school level and are graded as such. At my daughter’s middle school, many kids came out with either or both math and foreign language high school credits.

 

Exactly, only I am still a little ensure what it means. Apparently we can list them on a transcript as completed, but I am not sure we can actually grant credits for graduation or include the grade into the high school GPA for any class completed in middle school. 

I am just going to list math and foreign language as a side note. 

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Unless your state has a specific law about it, you could list them with grades, counting in GPA and in credits toward graduation, and just let the colleges decide if they want to refigure or not.  

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46 minutes ago, klmama said:

Unless your state has a specific law about it, you could list them with grades, counting in GPA and in credits toward graduation, and just let the colleges decide if they want to refigure or not.  

Or if the public colleges have very specific guidelines. 

I put math and foreign language from 8th on the transcript with a grade. It is used in the gpa.  I'm also clear how I calculated gpa so colleges can recalculate if that's how they roll. 

There is a lot of variety across districts and states.  

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21 hours ago, Roadrunner said:

 

Exactly, only I am still a little ensure what it means. Apparently we can list them on a transcript as completed, but I am not sure we can actually grant credits for graduation or include the grade into the high school GPA for any class completed in middle school. 

I am just going to list math and foreign language as a side note. 

Yeah, I am not sure myself. My freshman is in public school and has math credits from middle school. I haven’t looked into it closely because she is planning on 4 full years of math, so she shouldn’t need any middle school credits to count anyway. We are targeting the California public university systems, which do their own gpa calculations. I don’t think her 8th grade grades will count at all except Cal Poly if she ever applies there.

Edited by Mabelen

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48 minutes ago, Mabelen said:

Yeah, I am not sure myself. My freshman is in public school and has math credits from middle school. I haven’t looked into it closely because she is planning on 4 full years of math, so she shouldn’t need any middle school credits to count anyway. We are targeting the California public university systems, which do their own gpa calculations. I don’t think her 8th grade grades will count at all except Cal Poly if she ever applies there.

 

We are in a similar boat. I have been trying to figure out what the local PS is doing. I know they give foreign language and math credits, but I can’t figure out if they count those toward graduation. Parents of PS kids have no clue and are very puzzled by my questions. 🙂

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12 minutes ago, Roadrunner said:

 

We are in a similar boat. I have been trying to figure out what the local PS is doing. I know they give foreign language and math credits, but I can’t figure out if they count those toward graduation. Parents of PS kids have no clue and are very puzzled by my questions. 🙂

 

I was able to find our local guidelines in the MS and HS course catalogs/guidance booklets. Maybe look up a public school nearby?

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Foreign language is a high school course, whether they took in 8th grade or 5th grade.  Your child may be 8th grade "age" but can be doing high school courses.  A lot of homeschoolers graduate early in my area at 16 anyway.  I remember several years of Spanish that I took in high school - I would say they were elementary in my opinion now LOL.  They decide and you decide for your school.

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On 4/17/2019 at 11:34 AM, Roadrunner said:

 

We are in a similar boat. I have been trying to figure out what the local PS is doing. I know they give foreign language and math credits, but I can’t figure out if they count those toward graduation. Parents of PS kids have no clue and are very puzzled by my questions. 🙂

I wonder if they count them toward graduation as having met the requirements, but don’t include them in the gpa.  I’ve been advised to include all the high school level courses taken in middle school and tally up the credits, but then to have a separate line that says “credits included in high school gpa” and only include those in the gpa calculation.  

The main situation I can think it would matter in is a case where you need three years of a language and took one or two of those years in middle school in order to get it out of the way or free up time to take something else.  I think many kids that start taking high school level classes in middle school are going to continue challenging themselves and will wind up with plenty of credits anyway.

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5 minutes ago, Mom0012 said:

I wonder if they count them toward graduation as having met the requirements, but don’t include them in the gpa.

 

I think so. So many kids locally start foreign language in 7th and finish before junior year so they can focus on 6 AP classes many end up taking as juniors. This is fairly typical. And with math starting in 7th let’s advanced kids get to both AP Calculus and AP stats without having to double up, which wouldn’t make sense for most kids. 

I also think math/foreign language only is really a California thing. 

Also if a kid is doing full high school in middle school, at some point it becomes silly to keep that kid at home, so many would graduate early calling 7th grade 9th and so forth. Quark’s brilliant boy comes to mind. Otherwise one would be entering graduate school and not college. 

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On 4/16/2019 at 9:49 AM, Roadrunner said:

Exactly, only I am still a little ensure what it means. Apparently we can list them on a transcript as completed, but I am not sure we can actually grant credits for graduation or include the grade into the high school GPA for any class completed in middle school. 

 

On 4/17/2019 at 7:42 AM, Mabelen said:

 I don’t think her 8th grade grades will count at all except Cal Poly if she ever applies there.

 

CalPoly

“Middle School Coursework (if applicable)
Cal Poly will give consideration for coursework taken in 7th and 8th grade for Mathematics and Language Other than English only. The coursework must be entered into the application to receive consideration; it will not be assumed. The courses and grades received should be entered under 9th grade in the High School Coursework section.
 

In order to receive consideration, the same course cannot be repeated in 9th grade; students must continue on in the course progression. Example: If a student takes Spanish 1 in 8th grade, they must take Spanish 2 in 9th grade to receive consideration for Spanish 1. 

Academic Performance

College prep GPA Calculated by Cal Poly for 9th -11th grade coursework designated on the application (with honors points granted for courses designated as "honors," "college," “advanced placement" or "international baccalaureate" on a high school transcript, for up to eight semesters).” https://admissions.calpoly.edu/applicants/freshman/criteria.html

Edited by Arcadia
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3 minutes ago, Arcadia said:

 

 

CalPoly

“Middle School Coursework (if applicable)
Cal Poly will give consideration for coursework taken in 7th and 8th grade for Mathematics and Language Other than English only. The coursework must be entered into the application to receive consideration; it will not be assumed. The courses and grades received should be entered under 9th grade in the High School Coursework section.
 

In order to receive consideration, the same course cannot be repeated in 9th grade; students must continue on in the course progression. Example: If a student takes Spanish 1 in 8th grade, they must take Spanish 2 in 9th grade to receive consideration for Spanish 1. 

Academic Performance

College prep GPA Calculated by Cal Poly for 9th -11th grade coursework designated on the application (with honors points granted for courses designated as "honors," "college," “advanced placement" or "international baccalaureate" on a high school transcript, for up to eight semesters).” https://admissions.calpoly.edu/applicants/freshman/criteria.html

 

That’s what we have been saying, but I think it’s mostly a California thing. I am not sure other state schools operate under the same guidelines. 

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1 hour ago, Roadrunner said:

 

I think so. So many kids locally start foreign language in 7th and finish before junior year so they can focus on 6 AP classes many end up taking as juniors. This is fairly typical. And with math starting in 7th let’s advanced kids get to both AP Calculus and AP stats without having to double up, which wouldn’t make sense for most kids. 

I also think math/foreign language only is really a California thing. 

Also if a kid is doing full high school in middle school, at some point it becomes silly to keep that kid at home, so many would graduate early calling 7th grade 9th and so forth. Quark’s brilliant boy comes to mind. Otherwise one would be entering graduate school and not college. 

Yeah, but I’ve also seen lots of people with kids taking high school math, sciences and languages early on in middle school that do not graduate early.  I guess those are the kids I’m thinking of.

 

Edited by Mom0012
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1 hour ago, Roadrunner said:

 

That’s what we have been saying, but I think it’s mostly a California thing. I am not sure other state schools operate under the same guidelines. 

 

It varies by colleges whether public or private. I only list CalPoly GPA calculation because Mabelen mentioned CalPoly. It is not even consistent among the CalState and CalPoly. OP would have to check for each college her child is interested in.

“Your high school grade point average (GPA) is calculated on all "a-g" courses completed after ninth grade.

Here’s a simple way to calculate your high school GPA:

  • Using the chart below, enter the count of each grade you earned in “a-g” courses completed after ninth grade. For example, if you earned four As so far in “a-g” courses taken after ninth grade, enter “4” in the box next to the “A.” Continue entering all grades earned in “a-g” coursework. Ignore a plus or minus in a grade; a B- should be entered as a B, for example.
  • If you’ve taken any approved honors, Advanced Placement (AP), college, or International Baccalaureate (IB) classes in the 10th, 11th or 12th grades, enter the number of honors course grades you have earned that are C or better. The maximum number of honors courses you can use is eight semesters. No more than two approved honors-level courses taken in the 10th grade may be given extra points. Do not enter any count for honors courses with a grade of D or below. Enter one for each semester of approved honors work up to a maximum count of eight.
  • College courses used to meet CSU “a-g” requirements can also result in honors points. But no more than eight honors points may be awarded. A semester grade in a college course should be counted twice. For example, if you earned a B in a biology course at a community college, you would count this B grade twice in your GPA calculation.” https://www2.calstate.edu/apply/eligibility-index
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2 hours ago, Arcadia said:

 

 

CalPoly

“Middle School Coursework (if applicable)
Cal Poly will give consideration for coursework taken in 7th and 8th grade for Mathematics and Language Other than English only. The coursework must be entered into the application to receive consideration; it will not be assumed. The courses and grades received should be entered under 9th grade in the High School Coursework section.
 

In order to receive consideration, the same course cannot be repeated in 9th grade; students must continue on in the course progression. Example: If a student takes Spanish 1 in 8th grade, they must take Spanish 2 in 9th grade to receive consideration for Spanish 1. 

Academic Performance

College prep GPA Calculated by Cal Poly for 9th -11th grade coursework designated on the application (with honors points granted for courses designated as "honors," "college," “advanced placement" or "international baccalaureate" on a high school transcript, for up to eight semesters).” https://admissions.calpoly.edu/applicants/freshman/criteria.html

Yes, this is what I thought. Cal Poly will consider it towards their academic index, but not the UCs, and none of the other Cal States either, correct?

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4 minutes ago, Mabelen said:

Yes, this is what I thought. Cal Poly will consider it towards their academic index, but not the UCs, and none of the other Cal States either, correct?

 

Yes. And CalPoly is part of CalStates system which makes it confusing.

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On 4/24/2019 at 1:23 PM, Classically Minded said:

Foreign language is a high school course, whether they took in 8th grade or 5th grade.  Your child may be 8th grade "age" but can be doing high school courses.  A lot of homeschoolers graduate early in my area at 16 anyway.  I remember several years of Spanish that I took in high school - I would say they were elementary in my opinion now LOL.  They decide and you decide for your school.

In my state, which is also the OP's state, we need 4 credits English, 3 each of math, science, and social studies, and 2 of arts/humanities in order to get a high school diploma, and unfortunately, our state specifies that those credits need to be earned between 9th and 12th grade.  It is stupid, but that's the way it is.  

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On 5/7/2019 at 4:39 PM, happypamama said:

In my state, which is also the OP's state, we need 4 credits English, 3 each of math, science, and social studies, and 2 of arts/humanities in order to get a high school diploma, and unfortunately, our state specifies that those credits need to be earned between 9th and 12th grade.  It is stupid, but that's the way it is.  


Perhaps not necessarily stupid... A lot of colleges only accept credits completed in the 4 years prior to entering college as meeting admission elegibility requirements. i.e., they don't count credits "brought up" from middle school -- they assume that if the student did high school level Maths, Sciences, etc. in middle school, that the student will continue to progress with higher Maths, Sciences, etc. in high school to achieve the required # of credits in each subject area. So perhaps high schools that require core subject credits to be accomplished in grades 9-12 might be doing you a favor... 😉

Edited by Lori D.
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On 5/7/2019 at 7:39 PM, happypamama said:

In my state, which is also the OP's state, we need 4 credits English, 3 each of math, science, and social studies, and 2 of arts/humanities in order to get a high school diploma, and unfortunately, our state specifies that those credits need to be earned between 9th and 12th grade.  It is stupid, but that's the way it is.  

 

I fill out the transcript and give the diploma, so I don't even bother with what my local high school requires.  Is your child enrolled in public school or in one of the few states that have graduation requirements?  I assume the latter.  Here is a quote from the Home School Legal Defense Association:

 
Quote

 

Must the student comply with state or school district requirements in order to receive a diploma?

In most states parents are under no duty to imitate the public school standards for graduation, and parents can decide what students must do to receive a diploma. A few states have high school graduation requirements in their homeschool laws.

 

 

Edited by Classically Minded

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On 5/18/2019 at 7:29 PM, Classically Minded said:

 

I fill out the transcript and give the diploma, so I don't even bother with what my local high school requires.  Is your child enrolled in public school or in one of the few states that have graduation requirements?  I assume the latter.  Here is a quote from the Home School Legal Defense Association:

 

 

I'm in PA.  We have graduation requirements, and they say they have to be taken in grades 9-12.  So your child can take algebra 1 or Spanish 1 or whatever other high school level class in grade 8, but they won't count toward the three math classes or two humanities classes required for a diploma because they aren't in grades 9-12.  We discussed this in a PA forum at length fairly recently, and everyone seemed to agree that the law does not allow for that.  If you want a diploma that carries all the same rights and privileges as the school district ones, you have to meet the graduation requirements and have an official form signed by your 12th grade evaluator.  It is kind of a complicated law with a lot of vagueness to it in weird ways.  

 

 

[Graduation Requirements ]

(d) The following minimum courses in grades nine through twelve are established as a requirement for graduation in a home education program:

(1) Four years of English.

(2) Three years of mathematics.

(3) Three years of science.

(4) Three years of social studies

(5) Two years of arts and humanities.

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21 hours ago, happypamama said:

I'm in PA.  We have graduation requirements, and they say they have to be taken in grades 9-12.  So your child can take algebra 1 or Spanish 1 or whatever other high school level class in grade 8, but they won't count toward the three math classes or two humanities classes required for a diploma because they aren't in grades 9-12.  We discussed this in a PA forum at length fairly recently, and everyone seemed to agree that the law does not allow for that.  If you want a diploma that carries all the same rights and privileges as the school district ones, you have to meet the graduation requirements and have an official form signed by your 12th grade evaluator.  It is kind of a complicated law with a lot of vagueness to it in weird ways.

 

Ok, so in PA, you can't graduate early (15 or 16yrs old) I assume?  It is amazing the ways homeschooling differs in other states.

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17 minutes ago, Classically Minded said:

 

Ok, so in PA, you can't graduate early (15 or 16yrs old) I assume?


As long as the required credits are completed, I would guess that it is very possible to graduate at a younger-than-average age in PA -- by doing 8-10 credits per year or completing credits during the summer, so that grades 9-12 are completed in just 3 years. Or being academically advanced and doing all-high school work starting at age 12, for example.

Edited by Lori D.

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On 4/12/2019 at 4:03 PM, mazakaal said:

I included Latin I that ds took in 8th grade on his transcript because it was high school level and he did respectably well on a standardised Latin test that I found online, so I knew that he had actually learned it. 🙂 

Would you mind sharing which test you used? I'm looking for something similar to assess my dd's Latin.

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5 hours ago, Classically Minded said:

 

Ok, so in PA, you can't graduate early (15 or 16yrs old) I assume?  It is amazing the ways homeschooling differs in other states.

Oh, sure you can. You would just, as Lori said, take extra classes or year so as to complete the requirements in fewer than four years, or you'd start high school work early and end up, on paper, skipping a grade somewhere in the middle. We have to declare their ages each year but grades only in 3rd, 5th, and 8th (and apparently high school) because we have to do standardized tests in those three years. I suppose it could potentially get a little weird if you later decide that 8th grade was actually 9th grade, but you could simply say that your child went from 7th to 9th and never was in 8th.  It is a strangely worded law, but it could be worse, so. . .

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On 5/24/2019 at 9:09 PM, TCB said:

Would you mind sharing which test you used? I'm looking for something similar to assess my dd's Latin.

I think it was one of the previous exams from the National Latin Exam website... https://www.nle.org. It's been several years, so I'm not 100% sure of that. I just had him do a previous exam and graded it myself, so it's not an 'official' exam or anything. Hope that helps.

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13 hours ago, mazakaal said:

I think it was one of the previous exams from the National Latin Exam website... https://www.nle.org. It's been several years, so I'm not 100% sure of that. I just had him do a previous exam and graded it myself, so it's not an 'official' exam or anything. Hope that helps.

Thank you very much!

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