Menu
Jump to content

What's with the ads?

maize

What is happening in your garden right now?

Recommended Posts

We had our house painted in the late fall, and the workers absolutely decimated parts of my garden beds. I just noticed that my hydrangea, which was completely flattened, is sprouting, as is the peony next to it. If the clematis also comes back, I may just have to forgive the painters after all!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Pam in CT said:

IT IS THIRTY FIVE DEGREES AND HAILING IN CONNECTICUT at the moment

Sigh.  We've had *some* warm days -- my pussy willow is out, the galanthus is out, the forsythia is coming out, the daffodils and hyacinths are coming up -- but we keep lapsing back into hard frosts at night.  I tried yesterday to prep a new bed but the earth is still frozen 6 inches down.

So.Done.With.Winter.

Your fahrenheit temp almost matched our Celsius one!  33 and definitely not hailing.

 

  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Margaret in CO said:

Notice that there is more bare ground!

56162897_10156862536235731_3788185614910750720_n.jpg

Hi baby!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Over the last few days I have weeded another neglected garden bed, planted strawberries in containers and in the ground,  2 cherry trees,  an array of herbs, tomatoes, carrots, and an array of flowers.  Tomorrow 4 grape vines should be arriving so I'll start prepping those for planting.  I've got 4 blueberry bushes coming at some point, so I'm going to start prepping the area those will go.  The kids and I started our compost bin today since I found an empty trash can in the carport. I think that is the extent of our garden this year.  I really just wanted to spend this year getting our fruits established but the kids asked for the other stuff so why not

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Areal flooding.  This is normally a field, not marsh.

F93DF8EE-31C3-40D8-B0FC-7AD6E30DF8E1.jpeg

 

 

We aren’t in an evacuation area. But we’re cut off from mail, school... again.    It’s way too wet to garden.

Edited by Pen
  • Like 2
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

::sweating:: Over 90˚ today, so not much got done outside. Instead, I'll share a photo or two of my wall of cross vine flowers and think cool thoughts, lol:

 

cross vine 2.jpg

cross vine 1.jpg

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My plum tree started blossoming today. It is a multi variety tree and one variety always blossoms first which gives it a bit of a lopsided look for awhile.

I saw a couple of tiny asparagus spears poking up. I haven't really been able to get a good asparagus patch established though I keep trying. When I was a kid asparagus was something we gathered along the edges of irrigation ditches when out for a walk. 

Edited by maize
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I liked Chocolate-chip Chooky's found poem idea so much, I did another. Below is a poem with a line or two from each post, in order. Where there is an indent, it is the next poster's words, because some lines just seemed to beg to go together, lol.

___________________

"What Is Happening In Your Garden?"
by The Hive

I planted a jujube tree this week—I ought to be planting peas.
     The weeds are starting to sprout, and my kids stomped my daffodils

I'm planting some indoor hibiscus outdoors
—they won't last the winter but I don't care;
they'll be gorgeous through the summer.

I spend a lot of time thinking about what we should plant.
I’m kind of obsessing about berries.

One of the crocuses is up! 
Old timers call snow this time of year "robin snow”.
     Snow flurries hitting us, too. No garden plans for another month.

My crocuses were eaten by bunnies.
It's weeds and mud as far as the eye can see

I am just getting started.
We have zukes, cukes… and bell peppers. 

Leaves… are still frozen to the ground.
     Patches of grass showing… in the sunniest spots.
          Perennials are starting to come up. Redbuds are gorgeous.

I'm going to try gladiolus, zucchini and maybe tomatoes this year, but who knows…
If I could grow gladiolus I would be in heaven.

Buried under a thick layer of frozen leaves.
     Spring is early and short here in the desert.
     Trumpet flowers… vibrating with the hum of busy bees.

Mostly rain, mud, newts, banana slugs, weeds
with occasional daffodils, grass, violets.

Our daffodils have come and gone.
     Tulips are thinking of coming out.
          Herbs are waking up.

No matter how gloriously above freezing it is right now,
it’s not safe until about the beginning of June

This is what we're growing right now!
     The yard is ready for some fresh plants.

Gladiolus plants... fall over on their own weight
Big bumble bees… are back, but… seem sad with not much in bloom

Clouds of pollen are billowing all around.
     Mud and wet leaves with a few lingering handfuls of snow.
          Only cactus have thrived year round. 
               Puppy is working on pulling out… shrubs and plants.

I've been growing, harvesting, and replanting all winter.
     I'm trying to ward off the rats from infesting.

Back lawn has turned into a prairie.

Chickens do such a beautiful job of turning
the soil that nothing grows except roses.
In the orchard…there are apples;
soon there will be fuyu fruit as well.

I have been nauseous since the beginning of February;
this baby is kicking my behind.

I didn't dare go out there in case I disturbed the brown snake.
     I put in gravel paths and the weeding was killing me.

Worms shiver.

I can never figure out what’s lettuce and what’s weeds.
We may have been eating weed sandwiches last year.

Three thriving clumps of cilantro.
     We love homemade salsa all summer and fall.
     Someday I will grow onions and garlic.

They've been turned over, enhanced and planted:
brussell sprouts, french breakfast radishes, baby spinach, and sugar snap peas.

Popcorn popping on my apricot tree.

Ripping the bushes out is going to be a pain.
     Tell the husband, don't tell the husband?
          We used a flamethrower for weeding.
               Notice that there is more bare ground!

Daffodils are blooming and another flower
—I can't remember the name.

IT IS THIRTY FIVE DEGREES AND HAILING IN CONNECTICUT at the moment.
The earth is still frozen 6 inches down.
So.Done.With.Winter.

In the late fall… workers decimated… my garden.
My hydrangea… is sprouting, as is the peony next to it.
If the clematis also comes back, I may just have to forgive the painters after all!

Edited by Lori D.
  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We went to a plant sale last weekend and came home with two blueberry bushes, a raspberry bush, a blackberry bush, and several strawberry plants. So I can move on from my obsessing about planting berries. Lol. I figure it was money well spent so that I can move on from obsessing about them. Actually taking care of them is mentally healthier for me. 🙂 Of course we came home with other odds and ends too (lettuce, peppers, etc)

Now I really have most of what I plan to invest in for this year. We have some spots in the flower beds that need something but I’ll probably wait and pick stuff cheap off the clearance carts at Lowe’s. I did that last year and they came back to life and are gorgeous this year. My dd always likes to pick pitiful plants and try to love them back to life. So that is probably what the rest of our purchases will be. 

I still have two kids at home but my oldest two have left the nest and it has been hard on me. Not doubt all my babies in the garden are filling the void in some small way.

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We just built two raised beds that are 4x8.  I'm hoping they help me have a more successful gardening year.  I basically tilled up a part of the yard to make a garden the last time and it was a disaster with weeds - obviously. 🙂  I was a little overexcited.  So now I'm on the hunt for various compost sources to fill them up while planning it all out.  I'm loosely following the tenants of Square Foot Gardening.  I also keep thinking about landscaping the house, which only has a few overgrown shrubs that were planted over 30 years ago.  DH wants to pay someone for a plan, which I'm not opposed to, but I also kind of want to plan it myself.  We need to get that figured out so we have a master plan to work on.  I doubt we would be able to do it all in one year but it's we can't do anything without a plan.  

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow. 90s the past couple of days. I'm brown after hours spent weeding the areas my flamethrower won't work.

The wonderful (rare) rainy season we experienced in SoCal is making the garden explode.

Bill 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Weeds.  I'm just now starting the whole weeding/mulching process I was supposed to be doing all winter.  Although, it was a wet winter, but that doesn't prevent me from feeling like a lazy bum.  I had 10 yards delivered today; got tired of waiting for the tree company to be working in my area.  So that's the plan as it warms up.  Weed.  Mulch.  The ultimate goal [is] to try raised row gardening, but we'll see what actually happens.  🙂 

 

edited for grammar

Edited by CES2005
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can finally join in!  I bought 2 Loropetulum today and a geranium at the tech college plant sale. I’ve already put the geranium out but dh will have to dig holes for my loropetulem.  I’m planting them under a tree on the side of the yard for privacy.   They need very little sun here.  

My lantana are starting to sprout new leaves.   The butterflies will be ecstatic! 

One of the pittosporum that I planted last year is finally looking like it *might* do something.  One is taking off, but another is a pathetic sight.  I think I’ll be moving it to the shade.  

My jasmine vines are overtaking my deck and once they bloom, I’m cutting those suckers back.   They smell so good and are so pretty when they bloom but they harbor chiggers in all that shade.  

My spirea is finally blooming.  It’s still has a way to go before it’s a show stopper, but it will be one day.  

Right now I’m planting more for eventual privacy.  We’ve been here three years, but spent 10yrs living in the middle of woods out in the country.  I like the neighborhood feel, but I need my privacy. 

I thought about doing veggies this year.  I was all gung-ho in winter but now I think I’ll leave it to the farmers.  We have a great produce place so I’ll give the local farmers my business.  

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, ksr5377 said:

We just built two raised beds that are 4x8.  I'm hoping they help me have a more successful gardening year.  I basically tilled up a part of the yard to make a garden the last time and it was a disaster with weeds - obviously. 🙂  I was a little overexcited.  So now I'm on the hunt for various compost sources to fill them up while planning it all out.  I'm loosely following the tenants of Square Foot Gardening.  I also keep thinking about landscaping the house, which only has a few overgrown shrubs that were planted over 30 years ago.  DH wants to pay someone for a plan, which I'm not opposed to, but I also kind of want to plan it myself.  We need to get that figured out so we have a master plan to work on.  I doubt we would be able to do it all in one year but it's we can't do anything without a plan.  

If I do another garden, I will only try it with a raised bed.  We’ve had the worst luck with everything else, including container gardening. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Lori D. said:

I liked Chocolate-chip Chooky's found poem idea so much, I did another. Below is a poem with a line or two from each post, in order. Where there is an indent, it is the next poster's words, because some lines just seemed to beg to go together, lol.

___________________

"What Is Happening In Your Garden?"
by The Hive

I planted a jujube tree this week—I ought to be planting peas.
     The weeds are starting to sprout, and my kids stomped my daffodils

I'm planting some indoor hibiscus outdoors
—they won't last the winter but I don't care;
they'll be gorgeous through the summer.

I spend a lot of time thinking about what we should plant.
I’m kind of obsessing about berries.

One of the crocuses is up! 
Old timers call snow this time of year "robin snow”.
     Snow flurries hitting us, too. No garden plans for another month.

My crocuses were eaten by bunnies.
It's weeds and mud as far as the eye can see

I am just getting started.
We have zukes, cukes… and bell peppers. 

Leaves… are still frozen to the ground.
     Patches of grass showing… in the sunniest spots.
          Perennials are starting to come up. Redbuds are gorgeous.

I'm going to try gladiolus, zucchini and maybe tomatoes this year, but who knows…
If I could grow gladiolus I would be in heaven.

Buried under a thick layer of frozen leaves.
     Spring is early and short here in the desert.
     Trumpet flowers… vibrating with the hum of busy bees.

Mostly rain, mud, newts, banana slugs, weeds
with occasional daffodils, grass, violets.

Our daffodils have come and gone.
     Tulips are thinking of coming out.
          Herbs are waking up.

No matter how gloriously above freezing it is right now,
it’s not safe until about the beginning of June

This is what we're growing right now!
     The yard is ready for some fresh plants.

Gladiolus plants... fall over on their own weight
Big bumble bees… are back, but… seem sad with not much in bloom

Clouds of pollen are billowing all around.
     Mud and wet leaves with a few lingering handfuls of snow.
          Only cactus have thrived year round. 
               Puppy is working on pulling out… shrubs and plants.

I've been growing, harvesting, and replanting all winter.
     I'm trying to ward off the rats from infesting.

Back lawn has turned into a prairie.

Chickens do such a beautiful job of turning
the soil that nothing grows except roses.
In the orchard…there are apples;
soon there will be fuyu fruit as well.

I have been nauseous since the beginning of February;
this baby is kicking my behind.

I didn't dare go out there in case I disturbed the brown snake.
     I put in gravel paths and the weeding was killing me.

Worms shiver.

I can never figure out what’s lettuce and what’s weeds.
We may have been eating weed sandwiches last year.

Three thriving clumps of cilantro.
     We love homemade salsa all summer and fall.
     Someday I will grow onions and garlic.

They've been turned over, enhanced and planted:
brussell sprouts, french breakfast radishes, baby spinach, and sugar snap peas.

Popcorn popping on my apricot tree.

Ripping the bushes out is going to be a pain.
     Tell the husband, don't tell the husband?
          We used a flamethrower for weeding.
               Notice that there is more bare ground!

Daffodils are blooming and another flower
—I can't remember the name.

IT IS THIRTY FIVE DEGREES AND HAILING IN CONNECTICUT at the moment.
The earth is still frozen 6 inches down.
So.Done.With.Winter.

In the late fall… workers decimated… my garden.
My hydrangea… is sprouting, as is the peony next to it.
If the clematis also comes back, I may just have to forgive the painters after all!

Lori I    :wub:  this.

 

Yesterday was warm, so I spent it clearing; and today I hit Home Depot and grabbed armfuls of herbs and and foliage perennials and flowering shrubs... but it's still only 45 at midday, so I think I'll leave them sheltered for a few days before planting.

They had a great number of very cheap and very stylishly shaped terra-cotta pots... so I'm spending the afternoon conducting an experiment, painting them with high gloss Rustoleum paint.  Anyone ever tried this?  They were so cheap I don't really mind if they only last the season, but I'm curious if paint accelerates the demise of the pot, delays the demise of the pot, makes no difference to the lifespan of the pot, or just flakes off in the first good storm.  (I'm going latex because I'm too impatient to wait and too lazy to clean brushes.)

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Pam in CT said:

Lori I    :wub:  this.

 

Yesterday was warm, so I spent it clearing; and today I hit Home Depot and grabbed armfuls of herbs and and foliage perennials and flowering shrubs... but it's still only 45 at midday, so I think I'll leave them sheltered for a few days before planting.

They had a great number of very cheap and very stylishly shaped terra-cotta pots... so I'm spending the afternoon conducting an experiment, painting them with high gloss Rustoleum paint.  Anyone ever tried this?  They were so cheap I don't really mind if they only last the season, but I'm curious if paint accelerates the demise of the pot, delays the demise of the pot, makes no difference to the lifespan of the pot, or just flakes off in the first good storm.  (I'm going latex because I'm too impatient to wait and too lazy to clean brushes.)

I have wondered (and don't know for sure) is painting terra cotta would negatively impact the permeability of the clay and reduce a plant's chances of survival. 

Mine may not be a valid concern. 

Bill

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love to cook and long wanted a grow a large culinary herb garden. I finally planted it out last fall (being a better season than spring planting if one hopes to survive the summer heat here in LA).

I especially wanted to grow all the herbs typically used in the mixture called Zata'ar, including Syrian Oregano (biblical hyssop), Cretan oregano, Tymbta Spicata, and Cone-head thyme. I've planted a great number of thyme and marjoram/oregano varieties, rosemaries and lavenders. I'm so happy it is thriving. This was the right year to have big rains for me.

At the moment one of the most beautiful pair of plants are two culinary (common) sage plants. These I actually rooted from a bundle of sage that I purchased at a market. They looked to good to be that I took a shot. I rooted them in water on a ledge above a bright kitchen window. Quite a few pieces rooted. But two survived planting and hardening outside. They started with two leaves. Planted this fall.

Today they are getting to be big plants with beautiful spires of purple flowers that are about 4.5 feet tall (on plants over 3 feet). Beautiful.

It is somehow extra special knowing I nurtured these from grocery store cuttings.

Bill

 

 

Edited by Spy Car
  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Azeleas and Dogwood are blooming.  Some tulips are past, some are right at full, the rains last night dropped a lot of them.  Lovely violets, trilliums, and grape hyacinths around.  Can't take any pictures right now because phone is charging.  I live on a hill part so the excess rains haven't affected us much but have lots of the area.  

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

1 hour ago, Spy Car said:

 

Today they are getting to be big plants with beautiful spires of purple flowers that are about 4.5 feet tall (on plants over 3 feet). Beautiful.

 

 

Picture?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

re terracotta permeability

2 hours ago, Spy Car said:

I have wondered (and don't know for sure) is painting terra cotta would negatively impact the permeability of the clay and reduce a plant's chances of survival. 

Mine may not be a valid concern. 

Bill

 

I wondered too.  I only painted the outside and the rim, not the inside, on the theory that the pots will hold moisture from the inside but not breathe it out.  But who knows, really.  

They *look* smashing, so there's that.  I'll put up some pics once they're planted.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Spy Car said:

I have wondered (and don't know for sure) is painting terra cotta would negatively impact the permeability of the clay and reduce a plant's chances of survival. 

Mine may not be a valid concern. 

Bill

I haven't used painted terra cotta much, but have used large plastic pots and glazed terra cotta fairly extensively. Ime, as long as there is adequate bottom drainage (just the usual hole covered with an old potshard), the plants are fine. In fact, in our hot summers, the reduced evaporation is very helpful to most plants. I prefer clay pots, but plastic is perfectly functional, so I expect painted clay would be also. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Innisfree said:

I haven't used painted terra cotta much, but have used large plastic pots and glazed terra cotta fairly extensively. Ime, as long as there is adequate bottom drainage (just the usual hole covered with an old potshard), the plants are fine. In fact, in our hot summers, the reduced evaporation is very helpful to most plants. I prefer clay pots, but plastic is perfectly functional, so I expect painted clay would be also. 

I have always wondered if the enhanced evaporation of clay pots doesn't greatly advantage them (assuming plenty of water) in out hot climates due to the cooling effect of evaporation. I'm more careful to keep plants in plastic pots in a greater degree of shade for fear of overheating the roots.

Bill

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Pen said:

 

 

Picture?

 

The purple flowed plant is the common (culinary) sage that I planted this fall after rooting some pieces I purchased from a market.

Sorry, the lighting doesn't do the plant justice.

Bill

 

sage2.jpg

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Spy Car said:

I have always wondered if the enhanced evaporation of clay pots doesn't greatly advantage them (assuming plenty of water) in out hot climates due to the cooling effect of evaporation. I'm more careful to keep plants in plastic pots in a greater degree of shade for fear of overheating the roots.

Bill

Well, maybe. Certainly could be.

In my experience it's just been hard, practically speaking, to provide adequate water in some situations in clay pots. I can water once a day, maybe twice. But depending on temperature, exposure and pot size (and I don't mean itty bitty ones, more like 16-20" and sometimes larger) and on how heavily planted they are,  it can be an issue .

I still like clay better. I just assume they'll need more attention.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm jealous of you all in warmer climates where plant life is already happening!  Our spring is late this year (although that's not unusual), so nothing in our gardens yet.  In fact, we're at the beginning of a 3-day blizzard, so all that's on people's minds today is grocery store runs.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

re advantages (cooling) vs disadvantages (faster drying out) of terra-cotta

12 minutes ago, Innisfree said:

Well, maybe. Certainly could be.

In my experience it's just been hard, practically speaking, to provide adequate water in some situations in clay pots. I can water once a day, maybe twice. But depending on temperature, exposure and pot size (and I don't mean itty bitty ones, more like 16-20" and sometimes larger) and on how heavily planted they are,  it can be an issue .

I still like clay better. I just assume they'll need more attention.

This is me.  We don't have that many super-hot days in CT (certainly relative to southern CA), so while I do expect that the breathability of terra-cotta is a hypothetical advantage it's less beneficial here than elsewhere.

What we ARE famous for is very abrupt CHANGES in temperature, particularly in the fall and spring, which causes anything clay to crack (and also for enormous rocks to heave up from the earthen core into plowed & prepped beds, le sigh).  I don't think I've ever had a clay planter, glazed or unglazed, last more than two or three seasons.  They just don't make it through the winters.  

But I love the way clay *looks* so, what can you do.  Smaller ones I bring in.

Anyway, my initial report on painting the pots on the outside and rim but not inside: they *do* still seem to be absorbing from the inside (I can see the splotches where the water is absorbed)... but since they aren't able to exhale, they OTOH presumably won't have the expiration/temp decrease advantages but perhaps OTO will manage to *retain* moisture better than glazed or plastic (?).  Or alternatively the paint will flake off by the end of the season.  Which, at $3.48 per pot plus paint, fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, Pam in CT said:

re advantages (cooling) vs disadvantages (faster drying out) of terra-cotta

This is me.  We don't have that many super-hot days in CT (certainly relative to southern CA), so while I do expect that the breathability of terra-cotta is a hypothetical advantage it's less beneficial here than elsewhere.

What we ARE famous for is very abrupt CHANGES in temperature, particularly in the fall and spring, which causes anything clay to crack (and also for enormous rocks to heave up from the earthen core into plowed & prepped beds, le sigh).  I don't think I've ever had a clay planter, glazed or unglazed, last more than two or three seasons.  They just don't make it through the winters.  

But I love the way clay *looks* so, what can you do.  Smaller ones I bring in.

Anyway, my initial report on painting the pots on the outside and rim but not inside: they *do* still seem to be absorbing from the inside (I can see the splotches where the water is absorbed)... but since they aren't able to exhale, they OTOH presumably won't have the expiration/temp decrease advantages but perhaps OTO will manage to *retain* moisture better than glazed or plastic (?).  Or alternatively the paint will flake off by the end of the season.  Which, at $3.48 per pot plus paint, fine.

I would lose my mind if a clay pot only lasted 2 or 3 seasons. I get upset if one breaks after a decade or two. But you would laugh at our "winters."

Have you ever tried a milk paint type paint on a pot. I have not, but I bet a flat rustic paint (even irregularly applied) could give a new pot a nice "aged" look.

Bill

 

 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Spy Car said:

I would lose my mind if a clay pot only lasted 2 or 3 seasons. I get upset if one breaks after a decade or two. But you would laugh at our "winters."

Have you ever tried a milk paint type paint on a pot. I have not, but I bet a flat rustic paint (even irregularly applied) could give a new pot a nice "aged" look.

Bill

 

Never tried milk paint.  One year I had some leftover tinted stain and I kind of sponged it on to whatever pots I had lying around for a mossy mottled effect.  It was nice and held up as long as the pots, LOL.  But that is, theoretically at least, a sealant.  

(And getting my pots to look nicely "aged" is, anyway, not where my problems lie.  One good rainstorm and everything's streaked with dirt anyway.)

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So all the dwarf black-eyed-susans were just showing their baby leaves when I sent the kids out to weed (a completely separate flower bed).  SMH because they're gone...!

All I can do is laugh and try to convince myself that it's a good opportunity to switch up the landscaping...

  • Sad 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trellis up just in time!

This is first year I supplemented tomatoes with fish meal, bone meal, egg shells, and aspirin in the holes when planting. I normally have a great crop for burb-farming, but they have exploded this year. I’m going to have tomatoes coming out my ears!!! Salsa, baby, salsa!!!!!!  🍅

7D8B70BE-BDAD-4DD5-88A2-1DDCC2BA7F8E.jpeg

D3A5B179-656D-40DD-A16B-974EBAF29B2A.jpeg

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tuesday I noticed buds on Lilac bushes, but that was all before the snow started and now there is at least a foot plus of  snow with more coming down. 

  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Pen said:

@aggie96 aspirin in the holes?  Please explain!

 

Aspirin works wonderfully for prolonging the life of cut flowers too. 

The United States Department of Agriculture found that salicylic acid produced an enhanced immune response in plants of the nightshade family. The enhanced response helped prepare the plant for microbial or insect attack. The substance also seems to keep cut flowers living longertoo. Salicylic acid appears to block the plant’s release of a hormone that impels death after cutting. The cut flowers will die eventually but, usually, you can add some time by the use of aspirin on plants.

Gardeners at the University of Rhode Island sprayed a mixture of aspirin water on their vegetable gardens and found that plants grew more quickly and were more fruitful than a control group left untreated. Aspirin in vegetable gardens produced healthier plants than the control group. The team used a rate of three aspirins (250 to 500 milligrams) mixed with 4 gallons of water. They sprayed this every three weeks throughout the growing season. The vegetables were grown in raised beds with drip irrigation and compost-rich soil, which probably aided the effects found from using aspirin for plant growth.

...

Watch plants for their response to the treatment. Not all plants may be suitable for the aspirin regimen, but it has been shown that the nightshade family (eggplants, peppers, tomatoes, and potatoes) do benefit greatly.” https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/aspirin-for-plant-growth.htm

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Puddles are happening in my garden today.

Tulip buds are oh-so-close to opening, bits of color are peeping through.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Spy Car's very cool posts about growing his own herbs from purchased cuttings reminds me to get going on my own "herb work". For the past number of years, I've been growing/cutting/drying my own bay leaf, basil, mint, oregano, sage, rosemary, and thyme. Living in a very dry climate makes drying herbs a snap, and I am at the point where, if I *remember* to keep up with the cutting/drying throughout the spring and again in the fall (the high growth times for herbs out here), I can just about keep up with my own cooking demands for those herbs.

One of these days I hope to add dill and a few others to my herb pots!

And while cilantro doesn't stand up to the hot sun *at all*, because of the cooler-than-usual spring (for us), I'm having fantastic luck this year -- two very full plants, with extra tall stems, and leaves of a size I've never seen before! And no sign of "bolting to seed" yet, so for dinners, we're having everything I can think of that has cilantro in the ingredients list, LOL. Check this out:

 

cilantro.jpg

  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Pen Years ago I pinned a site growbetterveggies.com that talked about growing large crops of tomatoes. They had a formula that they sweared by. In the past I’ve had a tough time keeping the plants disease-free.  I’ve found lots of recommendations for adding aspirin but usually forget when it comes to planting. As mentioned above, it’s supposed to boost the plants natural immune system and ward off fungus and bacteria in the root system. I hope it works!! 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/10/2019 at 6:04 PM, Cecropia said:

So all the dwarf black-eyed-susans were just showing their baby leaves when I sent the kids out to weed (a completely separate flower bed).  SMH because they're gone...!

All I can do is laugh and try to convince myself that it's a good opportunity to switch up the landscaping...

I had milkweed coming up one day and the next all I had was stems coming out of the ground. I'm hoping it will come back. I also have some echinacea that comes up every spring, blooms maybe once with very short stemmed flowers, then just disappears, not to return for the rest of the season. Something must be eating it overnight, but I have no idea what it would be.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
54 minutes ago, wilrunner said:

I had milkweed coming up one day and the next all I had was stems coming out of the ground. I'm hoping it will come back. I also have some echinacea that comes up every spring, blooms maybe once with very short stemmed flowers, then just disappears, not to return for the rest of the season. Something must be eating it overnight, but I have no idea what it would be.

 

Maybe Snails? 

I guess whoever is eating your echinacea will be healthy!

 

is your milkweed supposed to be for butterflies?  

Edited by Pen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Monarch caterpillars eat my huge milkweed in 24 hours when they start showing up. Sure you don’t already have caterpillars?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/10/2019 at 6:04 PM, Cecropia said:

 

Very strange. I just tried to respond to @Pen and my entire previous post was still in editor. It gave me the option to exit editor, but when I exited, it didn't delete the post so I had to manually delete it. I've never had that happen before. I hope this will post.

Pen, yes, the milkweed is for the butterflies. It was only about a foot tall and hadn't bloomed yet, so I don't think it was eaten by caterpillars. I've been watching and haven't seen any yet.

I hadn't thought about snails eating my plants, but we have plenty of them, so it's a possibility. Do they live in mulch? When we lived up north, I used to put a small amount of beer in the lid of a container each night to kill the snails. Is there another method? I don't want to use any pesticide because of butterflies and caterpillars.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also have passion fruit vines growing. Last year, I planted one plant and wasn't sure it would make it through the winter. This year 4 vines came up. I dug one up and gave it to a friend. They also attract butterflies.

I would love to have fruit this year! I've never eaten a passion fruit.

IMG_20180805_195726009.jpg

Edited by wilrunner
  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was mistaken. I have a caterpillar!! I'm hoping it moves over to the passion vine to finish eating and doesn't become bird or lizard food.

 

IMG_20190412_194845004.jpg

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, aggie96 said:

Monarch caterpillars eat my huge milkweed in 24 hours when they start showing up. Sure you don’t already have caterpillars?

Forgive the PSA, but be extremely careful not to get milkweed sap in your eyes.

Use extreme caution around milkweed plants!!!

Bill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, wilrunner said:

I was mistaken. I have a caterpillar!! I'm hoping it moves over to the passion vine to finish eating and doesn't become bird or lizard food.

 

IMG_20190412_194845004.jpg

 

Do you have any milkweed at all left? I thought they cannot eat anything else

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, wilrunner said:

I also have passion fruit vines growing. Last year, I planted one plant and wasn't sure it would make it through the winter. This year 4 vines came up. I dug one up and gave it to a friend. They also attract butterflies.

I would love to have fruit this year! I've never eaten a passion fruit.

IMG_20180805_195726009.jpg

 

That’s gorgeous.  I’ve never even gotten to flower stage.  

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Pen said:

 

Do you have any milkweed at all left? I thought they cannot eat anything else

There's another variety of milkweed nearby, as well as the passion fruit vine. (I found another vine. That makes one planted and 4 new ones. I might have a problem next year if all the vines are that prolific!) The caterpillar looks like a monarch caterpillar and they're supposed to like the other 2 plants, too. I did consider moving it to another plant of the same variety of milkweed on the other side of my yard, but decided against it. I'm hoping it makes it through the night!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Pen said:

 

That’s gorgeous.  I’ve never even gotten to flower stage.  

I think it's much prettier in the pic than real life. But they're unusual and fragrant.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...