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Robin M

Book a Week 2019 - BW14: Whodunit Bookology - Brother Cadfael

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Happy Sunday and welcome to week fourteen in our 52 Books rambling roads reading adventure. Greetings to all our readers, welcome to all who are joining in for the first time and everyone following our progress. Visit  52 Books in 52 Weeks where you can find all the information on the annual, mini and perpetual challenges, as well as the central spot to share links to your book reviews. 

Our Whodunit Bookology detective of the month is Brother Cadfael created by Ellis Peters aka Edith Pargeter who is originally from the United Kingdom and passed away October 14, 1995 at the age of 82. 

Brother Cadfael came to life in A Morbid Taste for Bones through Peters interest in Shropshire history as well as herbs and gardening.  The series includes 4 prequel short stories and 22 books and takes place during the 12th Century between 1135 and 1145.  Cadfael, born May 1080 in Wales, was a soldier in the Crusades, a man at arms on a English war ship, and sired a son during the war before he became a Benedictine Monk at middle age, and lives at the Abbey of St Peter and St Paul, currently known as the Shrewsbury Abbey in Shrewsbury, England.  

There are a number of ways to complete the bookology challenge, including but not limited, to the suggestions below:  

·         Read the first book in the series.

·         Read one book per letter in the character's first or last name.

·         Read one book per letter in the author's first or last name.

·         If you're feeling really ambitious, one book per letter in the character's first and last name.

·         Follow in a character's footsteps and read a book set in the country or time period of the character. 

·         Follow in the author's footsteps and read a book set in their place or time of birth.    

Discover more about Ellis Peters and Brother Cadfael through her interview with Robbie Cranch on Mother Earth Living:  Mystery in the Garden - Interview with Ellis Peters;  Follow in the Footsteps of Brother Cadfael with Derek Jacobi and discover the timeless joys of 12th Century crime solving through Crime Reads Brother Cadfael: An Appreciation

Have fun following in the footsteps of Brother Cadfael

What are you reading?

 Link to week thirteen

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Good morning~

I finally finished Wild Country by Anne Bishop. .  Did my usual race through the story, then read again and took my time, read it more slowly.  Don't know what it was but found it a difficult read, although I thoroughly enjoyed it. Maybe the constant action and thinking of characters who were very aware one wrong move on their part could mean death.   Have to mull it over a bit more before write a review.  

Currently reading Morbid Taste of Bones and once I got used to Peters writing style, liking it so far.  

Since April is National Poetry Month, diving into Sage Cohen's Writing the Life Poetic.

 

Edited by Robin M
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Yesterday I finished a book that has been read by mumto2, Robin, JennW, LaughingCat, ErinE, Ali in OR and others. It was an interesting read that made me laugh occasionally, but it was also pretty gory.  I see from my Kindle records that I bought it three years ago, so it was time!

Midnight Riot (Rivers of London Book 1)  by Ben Aaronovitch

"Probationary Constable Peter Grant dreams of being a detective in London’s Metropolitan Police. Too bad his superior plans to assign him to the Case Progression Unit, where the biggest threat he’ll face is a paper cut. But Peter’s prospects change in the aftermath of a puzzling murder, when he gains exclusive information from an eyewitness who happens to be a ghost. Peter’s ability to speak with the lingering dead brings him to the attention of Detective Chief Inspector Thomas Nightingale, who investigates crimes involving magic and other manifestations of the uncanny. Now, as a wave of brutal and bizarre murders engulfs the city, Peter is plunged into a world where gods and goddesses mingle with mortals and a long-dead evil is making a comeback on a rising tide of magic. "

I may read on in the series but I'm not driven to do so right away.

Regards,

Kareni

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Robin, thank you, as always, for this wonderful thread. 

I read Humans of New York: Stories - 4 Stars - This book was better than the first one. The stories have more depth to them and are longer. Some of the stories were heartbreaking and almost brought me to tears, while others brought so much joy and hope. 

Reading this took me back to when I lived in New York back in the mid 1990’s. Although I love visiting New York, I’m relieved that I no longer live there. As the lyrics to the sunscreen song go, “Live in New York City once, but leave before it makes you hard.” 

Here is one of my favorite quotes. I have a few other favorites, but since they include photos, I cannot share them here. They're in my Good Reads review

“’If you could give one piece of advice to a large group of people, what would it be?’
‘Try your best to deal with life without medicating yourself.’ 
‘You mean drugs?’
‘I mean drugs, food, shopping, money, whatever. I ain't judging anybody, either. I was hooked on heroin for years. But now I’ve learned that every feeling will pass if you give it time. And if you learn to deal with your feelings, they'll pass by faster each time. So don't rush to cover them up by medicating them. You've got to deal with them.’”

9781447295556.jpg

MY RATING SYSTEM
5 Stars
The book is fantastic. It’s not perfect, since no book is, but it’s definitely a favorite of mine. 
4 Stars
Really Good
3 Stars
Enjoyable 
2 Stars
Just Okay – nothing to write home about
1 Star
Rubbish – waste of my money and time. Few books make it to this level, since I usually give up on them if they’re that bad.

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Well, the possibilities are nearly endless for me this week. I must finish re-reading The Chosen in order to be able to discuss it with dd14. I have three books out from the library that I still really want to get to: The Forgotten Garden by Morton, Shout by Halse Anderson, and No Pretty Pictures by Lobel. I’m also still reading Penderwicks in Spring aloud to my boys and A Long Obedience in the Same Direction for my own devotional read. I’d like to pick up the Ellis Peters challenge as I’ve always been interested to give her a try (& have attempted to read Brother Cadfael once.) 

This week I blogged my thoughts about News of the World and The Namesake.

@NeginThat Humans of NY book sounds delightful and poignant. Thanks for sharing! 

April is National Poetry Month!  I love it for that reason alone! 🎉🎉

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I'm about 2/3 of the way through The Trial of Lizzie Borden  by Cara Robertson. I've read a few books about the murders and watched the TV movie with Elizabeth Montgomery way back when so I wasn't sure this would hold my interest but so far it is! 

I've enjoyed watching the Brother Cadfael series and keep wanting to read the books - I'll put them on my imaginary bookshelf for a summer read. 

 

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2 hours ago, hopeistheword said:

@KareniThanks for sharing the Laurie Halse Anderson interview! I enjoyed reading that.  She’s a favorite of mine.

You are quite welcome, hopeistheword; I'm glad you enjoyed it. I'd thought it amusing that the post following mine would have a connection. It's a small world....

Regards,

Kareni

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21 hours ago, mumto2 said:

 

Braun actually apparently lived very near to us at the height of my fandom..........embarrassing LJB story, I was invited to a somewhat formal birthday party for a cat lover in the early 90’s and was rather desperate for a clever gift.  I only knew the birthday girl and was a bit nervous about appropriate etc.......  My hubby saved me via a client and brought me home two signed editions of one of her books as a surprise,   one for me and one for the present.  Lots of oohs and aahs over the book but then the group turned to me in mass because they thought I knew LBJ and could introduce them.  I fessed up about how I got the book....my husband.  I didn’t even know she lived in the area,  the book jacket had her living about 3 hours away.  The people at the party were certain she had not moved.  🤔 The client didn’t know her either but had actually bought several presigned copies at a bookstore and shared.  😂  So close......

She would have been an author I would have liked to know. From my attempts at internet stalking back in the early 2000's when she was still alive I couldn't figure out much besides she was married and still alive. 

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I love Brother Cadfael. It's a series my grandmother loved and she and I would sit on Sunday nights and watch him on PBS Mystery. I've since rediscovered him through audiobooks. Highly recommend listening to his books. Fantastic narrator and the writing is perfect for listening. I usually have to listen to the last hour at 2.5 speed because I HAVE TO KNOW WHAT'S GOING TO HAPPEN AND I CAN'T BE CALM. 

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I missed posting last week.

Perfect for National Poetry Month, I am in the midst of a book by a young Danish poet: Digte by Yahya Hassan. In 2013, at the young age of 18, Yahya Hassan became a literary sensation in Denmark. He is of Palestinian heritage, and both he and his poems have stirred up a lot of controversy over the years. I think he is enormously talented, and I hope he continues to write and to publish. 

I finished two books this week:

The Blood of Emmett Till. At least four stars, and maybe five. My recent trip to the National Museum of African American History and Culture prompted me to read this, and I learned a lot. It fit into two of my 2019 categories: The American South and the 1960s. The murder occurred in 1955, but I can't think of a better place to being reading about the 1960s than this book.

The Outsiders. Five stars. I can't believe I never read this before! I think it just might be one of my all-time favorite YA novels. And it is mind-boggling to me that S.E. Hinton wrote it while she was still in high school. It fits into two of my categories: the 1960s and 50 states (Oklahoma).

ETA: I think I finished The Goblin Emperor since the last time I posted. 5 stars. Many, many thanks to those who recommended it! I recall that several of you have read it.

Edited by Penguin
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I fell in love with Brother Cadfæl during the ‘90s. (I can’t resist using the æsc even though I’m quite sure the author never did given that the name is Welsh, not a Latin derivative.)    One of my dreams is to go to Shrewsbury, especially during the book fest. <le swoon> I big puffy ❤️ LOVE Derek Jacobi as Cadfael. 

As for reading, well, in addition to my “regular” work rendering aid and comfort and occasionally saving a life, I’m in charge of three other major projects at work. Their deadlines have overlapped such that I’m essentially workjng 2 full time jobs. I’m slowly working my way through four or five different books. I began a “history of philosophy” study this year and am using the reading list from the podcast of the same name “A History of Philosophy without any Gaps” — highly recommended, by the by. 

I joined the Theologica group when it formed, but, alas, have not even had a chance to read the posts, let alone contribute. 

Anyway, I’m sorry to intrude; I saw Brother Cadfael and was moved to reminisce about one of my favorite series.

 

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Robin, I'm glad to hear your Dad is doing well after surgery.  I can't wait for your review on Wild Country.  I still haven't gone back to that one.

I haven't gotten very far this last week.  I'm one book closer in my Psy/Changeling reread, finishing Shards of Hope.  I read Faking Forever (First Wives #4) by Catherine Bybee, which is a spin off of her Weekday Brides Series.  It wasn't my favorite, but it was a nice break and a quick read.  (I enjoy Catherine Bybee as part of the Amazon Unlimited library whenever I need a quick light read.)  

All the talk last week about Marie Force reminded me of her newest release, so I finished Fatal Reckoning (Fatal #14).  If you've been following the series you really want to read this book.  Sam Holland's father, Skip, succumbs to his injuries, and the hunt is on to find his killer.  There are lots of twists and turns, not all of which I saw coming.  (It was finished up right after Marie Force buried her own father, and there were times I just want to cry, so be forewarned.)

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I finished Story of the World Volume 3 and started Volume 4.

I am trying to read The Penderwicks, but I am just not feeling this book.  I am halfway through and I really don't care if I finish it or not.  I like a lot of children's literature and I know a lot of people love The Penderwicks, but I am struggling with this.  

The other book I finished, which was recommended here, was Born a Crime by Trevor Noah.  Typically, I would have put this book down after just a few pages.  I really don't care for foul language at all -- anything worse that what would make it into a PG-13 movie and I'm done.  This book had so.much.cursing.  But, his story is incredible.  He is an engaging storyteller and I was fascinated by his childhood.  I feel like I got a glimpse of apartheid that I could never get anywhere else.

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5 hours ago, Robin M said:

Good morning~

I finally finished Wild Country by Anne Bishop. .  Did my usual race through the story, then read again and took my time, read it more slowly.  Don't know what it was but found it a difficult read, although I thoroughly enjoyed it. Maybe the constant action and thinking of characters who were very aware one wrong move on their part could mean death.   Have to mull it over a bit more before write a review.  

Currently reading Morbid Taste of Bones and once I got used to Peters writing style, liking it so far.  

Since April is National Poetry Month, diving into Sage Cohen's Writing the Life Poetic.

 

Dd just finished Wild Country and it seemed to take her far longer than normal so I think she mulled as she read.  I know I would have had a very difficult time keeping track of the characters if I hadn’t reread The Others series right before it was released.

I just checked One Corpse too Many out after reading A Morbid Taste for Bones last fall. Although I have watched and listened to the vast majority of the Cadefel series over the years I have to admit I still enjoy them.  I may attempt a reread in order in the next couple of years, so far I have been reading them in Kindle form.😉

I finally had a chance to read Val McDermid’s The Distant Echo which is the first in the Karen Pirie series which I have enjoyed 2 or 3 of years ago.  These are gritty crime novels not cozies.  It was dated having been released over 20 years ago when DNA analysis was first becoming a reality and dealt with the reopening of a cold case from the late 70’s in St. Andrews.  Four drunk/high male students find a dying murder victim in a blizzard in an ancient cemetery on their way home from a party,  their lives are ruined......although 20 years later they are doing quite well. Getting caught up in the story was hard,  everyone had a nickname so multiple names for the same character and honestly not a single character was really likable.  It was good after I really tried to follow it, the addition of a red herring saved the book.  This is one of my Scotland 10 books and I plan to read more in the series.  

I also finished The Gown which is a fictional story intermixed with a history of the making of Elizabeth 2’s wedding gown.  Really well done, not just about the gown but what life in England was like in the years following WW2.  I gave it 5*.  I will admit to being really sad that my favorite character in this book was a fictional one.

Finally my current audiobook is Once Upon a River by Diane Setterfield.  I have tried to read at least two other books by her and never managed to pick the book up again after the first few pages.  Not sure if the audio element......Juliet Stevenson is the narrator ❤️.......or the fact that the setting really exists ( a pub called The Swan on the Thames in Oxfordshire) has me hooked, but I do plan to keep going.  Only 2 hours in but lots of quilting planned the next couple of days so hopefully I can finish it.

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1 hour ago, brehon said:

Anyway, I’m sorry to intrude; I saw Brother Cadfael and was moved to reminisce about one of my favorite series.

Hoping you get moved to reminisce more often!

3 hours ago, aggieamy said:

I love Brother Cadfael. It's a series my grandmother loved and she and I would sit on Sunday nights and watch him on PBS Mystery. I've since rediscovered him through audiobooks. Highly recommend listening to his books. Fantastic narrator and the writing is perfect for listening

1

That's a lovely keepsake memory; and, I agree the audiobooks make for perfect listening!

4 hours ago, Mothersweets said:

I've enjoyed watching the Brother Cadfael series and keep wanting to read the books - I'll put them on my imaginary bookshelf for a summer read. 

 Hoping that summer gifts you with Cadfael time!

For anyone that doesn't want to/ cannot create a space to read, or listen, to the unabridged stories ..... my then younger teens and I found some of the abridged dramatised versions - with Jacobi as Cadfael - enjoyable too.  (Very similar to the TV Series.  Though The Virgin in the Ice was a bit much, content-wise, for my dd back then.)

I've been distracted by all the interesting links,  book reviews, and the books being read.  Love BaWers! 

ETA:  Juliet Stevenson is a favourite narrator here too @mumto2 ..... Off to see what audio you're quilting to (& The Gown book!), after I 'check-in'.

Edited by tuesdayschild
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Hi all!

I finished reading Black Beauty last week. Definitely not going to make my girls read it. I'll offer it as an option at some point, but I think they'd just find it depressing at this point. 

And I started reading J. Gresham Machen's The Virgin Birth of Christ. I've read a couple other books by Machen, but this one is far more academic in nature. Wasn't what I was expecting, lol! But I'm enjoying it very much. However, I will probably pause my reading on that one because I have a couple of library books to pre-read for the girls.

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I’ve purposely set up a very lite ‘need to read’ selection for this month with just 6 books as life things are lining up to be busy-ish….  which might create the perfect opportunity for ‘comfort’ listens.

Completed: 

  • 46:  The Black Ascot: Ian Rutledge Bk21 ~ Charles Todd, narrated by Simon Prebble    (4) Counties visited: Gloucestershire, Oxfordshire, London, Worcestershire, Hampshire,  Leicestershire,  Lancashire, (Ullswater) Cumbria, Sussex, Dover, Kent, Canterbury, Buckinghamshire

Currently reading/listening to:

  • KJV Bible:  Zechariah
  • Crime and Punishment ~ Fyodor Dostoevsky, Constance Garnett – translator, narrated by George Guidall  (audio 25hrs 1m)  Classic/ Chunkster/ Russia     Thanks for the ‘classics’ reading encouragement last week BAWers😉 .    I’m chipping away at this and really enjoying having Guidall read it to me; I’m now 40% through (book & audio).
  • The Titian Committee:  Jonathan Argyll Bk2 ~ Iain Pears  pub 1999  230pgs   (epukapuka ebook)
  • One Corpse Too Many: Brother Cadfael Bk2 ~ Ellis Peter, narrated by Stephen Thorne  8hrs 4m (UK)                                                     http://thecadfaelchronicles.co.uk/cadfael-maps  (for anyone else that likes maps too, and/or is listening to an audio version)

***

@purpleowl My dd, a lover of horses, does not like Black Beauty at.all even now at 17. 

Edited by tuesdayschild
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Currently FREE for Kindle readers ~

Inspirational romance about which I've heard good things:  Brody's Redemption (Small Town Scandals Book 1) by Kay Lyons

Regards,

Kareni

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Well, I finished Book 5 of the Mahabharata.  That puts me roughly halfway done.

I have several nonfiction books waiting for me to start them, but I just want to put M behind me ASAP.

We are close to the end of On the Shores of Silver Lake - the audiobook.  (We are listening to the LIW series in order.)  My kid has been dying to know when Almanzo appears in Laura's life, and it just happened today.  She is so excited, LOL.  The kids asked me if there is a movie based on these books, so I got a copy of the TV show, and we've started watching that.  My kids like it better than I did as a kid - I always loved the books and cringed at the show.  Too many crying scenes.

I'm also close to finishing Spy Ski School (our read-aloud) - the 3rd or 4th book in the Spy School series.  My kids really enjoy this series, so we have the next 2 waiting already.  I want to read something else, but they are insistent.  I wish I could read faster.

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5 hours ago, SKL said:

Well, I finished Book 5 of the Mahabharata.  That puts me roughly halfway done.

I have several nonfiction books waiting for me to start them, but I just want to put M behind me ASAP.

We are close to the end of On the Shores of Silver Lake - the audiobook.  (We are listening to the LIW series in order.)  My kid has been dying to know when Almanzo appears in Laura's life, and it just happened today.  She is so excited, LOL.  The kids asked me if there is a movie based on these books, so I got a copy of the TV show, and we've started watching that.  My kids like it better than I did as a kid - I always loved the books and cringed at the show.  Too many crying scenes.

I'm also close to finishing Spy Ski School (our read-aloud) - the 3rd or 4th book in the Spy School series.  My kids really enjoy this series, so we have the next 2 waiting already.  I want to read something else, but they are insistent.  I wish I could read faster.

Dd8 is reading through the Little House books and I believe this is the book she is currently reading.

And, regarding the bolded: Yes!

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10 hours ago, brehon said:

 

 

5 hours ago, SKL said:

We are close to the end of On the Shores of Silver Lake - the audiobook.  (We are listening to the LIW series in order.)  My kid has been dying to know when Almanzo appears in Laura's life, and it just happened today.  She is so excited, LOL.  The kids asked me if there is a movie based on these books, so I got a copy of the TV show, and we've started watching that.  My kids like it better than I did as a kid - I always loved the books and cringed at the show.  Too many crying scenes.

Oops, don’t know how to get rid of that first quote. 

I never did like the show Little House on the Prairie, though I liked the books. But my DH’s sister and mom really liked both, and watched it a lot. The whole family refers to the show as “Little Boo Hoo on the Prairie” though, so I guess it was too much even for them.

ETA: I think there is a movie based on Laura’s life that I watched with DD but I can’t remember the name of it. Or maybe it was a mini series.

Edited by emba56
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I thought others might enjoy this post from the Word Wenches site. I'm particularly impressed by the elephant quilt.

Quilts 2019!

Regards,

Kareni

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4 hours ago, Kareni said:

I thought others might enjoy this post from the Word Wenches site. I'm particularly impressed by the elephant quilt.

Quilts 2019!

Regards,

Kareni

That quilt is incredible!

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I actually finished a book! That's not really a great accomplishment since it was only 157 pages but I'm still happy to have finished something. The book is The White Book and was recommended to me elsewhere online. It's a powerful little book, written poetically, and translated from Korean. I couldn't find an ebook copy so I borrowed the hardcover from the library and am glad I did. The cover is white, the book (at least this copy) is so new and crisp with white pages, and it fit perfectly with the story. Story isn't really the right word for it but I don't know what else to call it. The narrator is haunted by the shadow of her sister who was born long before her, and who only lived for two hours. She believes that had her sister lived she might not have been conceived, since her parents would have already had a daughter. I know my description doesn't do it justice. The prose is just lovely, even in translation. It only took me about an hour to read. I gave it 4 stars on Goodreads but if they had half stars it would be 4-1/2. Though I thought it was a lovely book I don't consider it a 5 star read.

Also reading -

Still reading Pachinko for book club. Our meeting is next Monday and I'm a little over half way through so I know I'll finish it in time. I'm also still reading Devil in the Grove: Thurgood Marshall, The Groveland Boys, and the Dawn of a New America, Buried in the Sky: The Extraordinary Story of the Sherpa Climbers on K2's Deadliest Day, and The Winter of Our Discontent

I recently started The Ghost Map: The Story of London's Most Terrifying Epidemic - and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World. It's an account of a cholera epidemic in Victorian London and how a doctor and a reverend tracked and mapped the epidemic to find the source of the outbreak. As the subtitle suggests it covers more than just the local cholera outbreak. 

Yesterday I used my Audible credit for the true crime book Bitter Almonds. As I listen some of it sounds familiar. I know I haven't read the book but I must have heard about this case at some point. 

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I overloaded my Overdrive and gaaasp, had to return a book unread - Venetia by Heyer. It flat out expired on me.

Reading:

"The sixth day" by Coulter / Ellison

Audiobook:

"Beyond Boundaries" by Townsend (somewhat work-related)

 

Still on my Overdrive bookshelf:

"Arabella" by Heyer

"The Great Alone" by Kristin Hannah

I do want to start on the Cadfael series via Audiobook since I am going to be doing a fair amount of driving and need something to keep me sane.

Edited by Liz CA
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I missed posting again Week 13!

My overall reading goals are to take in a mix of fiction and nonfiction, spiritually enriching, informative, and fun selections; to keep up with the Druid book discussion/study group I'm in, to put eyes on words not related directly to work more often than last year, and to read books that I bought ages ago and still haven't read.

My currently reading list:

The Táin translated by Ciaran Carson Update: 3 chapters to go.

Odin: Ecstasy, Runes & Norse Magic by Diana L. Paxson Reading on Kindle. I haven't made progress on this one in the last month.

The Uninhabitable Earth by Davis Wallace-Wells Finally came up on hold at the library (audiobook)

A Wizard of Earthsea by Ursula K. Le Guin (DH picked it up on Audible, so I started listening to it. Not even through the first book yet, and I've concluded that the TV miniseries was even worse dreck than I'd thought).

Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman. On audible. Put in when coworker was with me. She's made no comment so far. I read it years ago, so it's technically a re-read, but don't remember much of it.

Next Up:

Digital Minimalism by Cal Newport 

My 10x10 challenge categories:

1. humor Tough Sh*t and George Carlin Reads to You

2. science (nonfiction)

3. fantasy & science fiction by new-to-me authors (Ursula K. Le Guin falls in this category)

4. LGBT

5. classic fiction

6. folklore (The Táin will satisfy this)

7. religion (nonfiction) (Odin: Ecstasy, Runes & Norse Magic by Diana L. Paxson will satisfy this)

8. law (nonfiction)

9. modern fiction in translation (i.e., originally published in a language other than English)

10. books by women of color (Stone Sky met this requirement)

The books must of course all be separate selections, though they may fit into more than one category, they cannot be used for more than one, so that I read 10 books for it.

Books I've read for the 52 books in 52 weeks challenge this year (most recently completed first):

8. George Carlin Reads to You by George Carlin (on Audible)

7. The Broken Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin (on Audible)

6. Tough Sh*t: Life Advice from a Fat, Lazy Slob Who Did Good by Kevin Smith (on audiobook, read by the author). Started this one AND finished it last week. 

5. The Stand (unabridged) by Stephen King (on audiobook).  Finished last week!

4. Akata Warrior by Nnedi Okorafor Finished since my last post!

3. American Like Me by America Ferrera. 

2. The Stone Sky by N.K. Jemisin (third book in the Broken Earth series) 

1. The Sky-Blue Wolves by S. M. Stirling 

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On 3/31/2019 at 7:37 PM, Penguin said:

The Blood of Emmett Till. At least four stars, and maybe five. My recent trip to the National Museum of African American History and Culture prompted me to read this, and I learned a lot. It fit into two of my 2019 categories: The American South and the 1960s. The murder occurred in 1955, but I can't think of a better place to being reading about the 1960s than this book.

One of the most horrific stories I've ever read. I accidentally looked up pictures online once while I was reading in bed and had to wake up my DH to hold me while I cried. Why are all these things so much more traumatizing when you have children yourself?!?!

On 3/31/2019 at 9:37 PM, tuesdayschild said:

Completed: 

  • 46:  The Black Ascot: Ian Rutledge Bk21 ~ Charles Todd, narrated by Simon Prebble    (4) Counties visited: Gloucestershire, Oxfordshire, London, Worcestershire, Hampshire,  Leicestershire,  Lancashire, (Ullswater) Cumbria, Sussex, Dover, Kent, Canterbury, Buckinghamshire

This might be a semi-spoiler question. Probably not though.

By book 21 have they given Ian Rutledge anything positive in life? A girlfriend? A superior officer that isn't out to get him? Mental stability? I love the writing and the time period but after six books (including some in the teens) I started to get depressed. I'd love to pick the series back up but won't until they help our hero out a bit. 

On 4/1/2019 at 1:22 AM, SKL said:

I'm also close to finishing Spy Ski School (our read-aloud) - the 3rd or 4th book in the Spy School series.  My kids really enjoy this series, so we have the next 2 waiting already.  I want to read something else, but they are insistent.  I wish I could read faster.

Ditto ditto. We're now on book 4 of the Boxcar children series. DH gets to read Chews on Books Mrs. Piggle Wiggle and I keep going with the Boxcar Children. We only have books 1-10 in the house. He'll have to discover there are more in the series when he goes to school next year. 

23 hours ago, Lady Florida. said:

I recently started The Ghost Map: The Story of London's Most Terrifying Epidemic - and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World. It's an account of a cholera epidemic in Victorian London and how a doctor and a reverend tracked and mapped the epidemic to find the source of the outbreak. As the subtitle suggests it covers more than just the local cholera outbreak. 

You and I seem to have the same taste in non-fiction so I'm eagerly awaiting your review on this!

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Those of you who like non-fiction/history might be interested in this book I stumbled upon last night.

Last night I was reading some reviews of the book I just finished and happened on the Goodreads page of author Lois McMaster Bujold. The number of books she has listed is not large but is eclectic. I saw manga, mysteries, fantasies, romances (including some male/male romances I've also enjoyed), Don Camillo books (yes!!!), an Edward Gorey book (hello @Violet Crown) and a hodgepodge of non-fiction including this intriguing title:

Bat Bomb: World War II's Other Secret Weapon

Here's the blurb:

 " It was a crazy way to win World War II in the Pacific--

All the United States had to do was to attach small incendiary bombs to millions of bats and release them over Japan's major cities. As the bats went to roost, a million fires would flare up in remote crannies of the wood and paper buildings common throughout Japan. When their cities were reduced to ashes, the Japanese would surely capitulate...

The plan made sense to a handful of eccentric promoters and researchers, who convinced top military brass and even President Roosevelt to back the scheme. It might have worked, except that another secret weapon--something to do with atoms--was chosen to end the war.

Told here by the youngest member of the team, this is the story of the bat bomb project, or Project X-Ray, as it was officially known. In scenes worthy of a Capra or Hawks comedy, Jack Couffer recounts the unorthodox experiments carried out in the secrecy of Bandera, Texas; Carlsbad, New Mexico; and El Centro, California, in 1942-1943 by "Doc" Adams' private army. This oddball cast of characters included an eccentric inventor, a distinguished Harvard scientist, a biologist with a chip on his shoulder, a movie star, a Texas guano collector, a crusty Marine Corps colonel, a Maine lobster fisherman, an ex-mobster, and a tiger.

Not to be defeated by minor logistical hurdles, the bat bomb researchers risked life and limb to explore uncharted bat caves and "recruit" thousands of bats to serve their country. Through months of personality conflicts, military snafus, and technical failures the team pressed on, certain that bats could end the war with Japan. And they might have--in their first airborne test, the bat bombers burned an entire brand-new military airfield to the ground.

For everyone who relishes true tales of action and adventure, Bat Bomb is a must-read. Bat enthusiasts will also discover the beginnings of the scientific study of bats. "

This is all new to me!

Regards,

Kareni

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Quoting myself:

On 3/31/2019 at 11:58 AM, Kareni said:

I may read on in the series but I'm not driven to do so right away.

I lied.

Last night I finished Moon Over Soho: 2 (Rivers of London 2) by Ben Aaronovitch. I enjoyed it and look forward to reading on in the series.

 "BODY AND SOUL
 
The song. That’s what London constable and sorcerer’s apprentice Peter Grant first notices when he examines the corpse of Cyrus Wilkins, part-time jazz drummer and full-time accountant, who dropped dead of a heart attack while playing a gig at Soho’s 606 Club. The notes of the old jazz standard are rising from the body—a sure sign that something about the man’s death was not at all natural but instead supernatural.

Body and soul—they’re also what Peter will risk as he investigates a pattern of similar deaths in and around Soho. With the help of his superior officer, Detective Chief Inspector Thomas Nightingale, the last registered wizard in England, and the assistance of beautiful jazz aficionado Simone Fitzwilliam, Peter will uncover a deadly magical menace—one that leads right to his own doorstep and to the squandered promise of a young jazz musician: a talented trumpet player named Richard “Lord” Grant—otherwise known as Peter’s dear old dad."

Regards,

Kareni

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40 minutes ago, Kareni said:

Quoting myself:

I lied.

Last night I finished Moon Over Soho: 2 (Rivers of London 2) by Ben Aaronovitch. I enjoyed it and look forward to reading on in the series.

 "BODY AND SOUL
 
The song. That’s what London constable and sorcerer’s apprentice Peter Grant first notices when he examines the corpse of Cyrus Wilkins, part-time jazz drummer and full-time accountant, who dropped dead of a heart attack while playing a gig at Soho’s 606 Club. The notes of the old jazz standard are rising from the body—a sure sign that something about the man’s death was not at all natural but instead supernatural.

Body and soul—they’re also what Peter will risk as he investigates a pattern of similar deaths in and around Soho. With the help of his superior officer, Detective Chief Inspector Thomas Nightingale, the last registered wizard in England, and the assistance of beautiful jazz aficionado Simone Fitzwilliam, Peter will uncover a deadly magical menace—one that leads right to his own doorstep and to the squandered promise of a young jazz musician: a talented trumpet player named Richard “Lord” Grant—otherwise known as Peter’s dear old dad."

Regards,

Kareni

🤣. I hate to say this but I am so glad you read another one.   Your timing is perfect!  The entire arc seems to have been published.  I am not entirely sure that the series is over but if it is the ending of the last book was satisfying.   I really enjoyed my reread because it made it easy to remember the characters,  there are MANY reoccurring small characters that are cool when you can really remember them.  Also there are bookcase descriptions occasionally .......

@aggieamy  Ds loved the original Boxcar author but announced he was done with the series like two chapters into the first with the ghost writer.  As the reader just remember Boxcar Children is so much better than Magic Treehouse......I think I read the first 20 of those out loud thanks to Target who displayed new releases a bit too proudly for my taste.  Both my kids loved those.....yes Dd found them first so many of those were read twice!

I finished Once Upon a River and totally enjoyed LISTENING to it.  A good story about oral storytelling, be warned it centers on three little girls drowned in the river so not a “nice cuddlely” story, but listening to it was a pleasure overall.  I don’t think I would have read beyond the first mother’s horror.....I listen to things I do not read because by the time I can stop an turn things off the book is past whatever really  upsets me and I am able to choose to continue.

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Regarding the Rivers of London series:

6 hours ago, mumto2 said:

🤣. I hate to say this but I am so glad you read another one.   Your timing is perfect!  The entire arc seems to have been published.  I am not entirely sure that the series is over but if it is the ending of the last book was satisfying.   I really enjoyed my reread because it made it easy to remember the characters,  there are MANY reoccurring small characters that are cool when you can really remember them.  Also there are bookcase descriptions occasionally .......

I hear you. It is very luxurious to start a series that is well underway or complete. Shall I confess that I picked up the third book today when I volunteered at the library and have already read a chunk? 

Bookcase descriptions? I'm drawing a blank....

Regards,

Kareni

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1 hour ago, Kareni said:

Regarding the Rivers of London series:

I hear you. It is very luxurious to start a series that is well underway or complete. Shall I confess that I picked up the third book today when I volunteered at the library and have already read a chunk? 

Bookcase descriptions? I'm drawing a blank....

Regards,

Kareni

I didn’t notice them until a bit further into the series but they might be in the earlier ones.  When visiting a crime scene Peter stops and studies the bookcases.  He spots books like The Dark is Rising and they normally convince him he is right,  it is a magic practitioner.  I actually hunted down and read one of the children’s books that I was unfamiliar with.  😉

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I told @Penguin I made my own 52 Weeks Bingo page this year. I have meant to post it here, so I guess this is as good a time as any. So, one is the form, one is my bingo page so far this year: 

 

1C4D30AA-F4C4-4BD7-B320-C9E1F8352437.jpeg

5A0C094C-0992-44DF-B921-3008F13F5005.jpeg

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Nice bingo, @Quill !

(I am at a minor league baseball game with my family. I brought my book because baseball is about five innings too long).

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Howdy, a bit busy finalizing flooring and lots of interior details for house. All the fun stuff.   Here's a picture. A bit messy and no flooring yet, but a good idea of downstairs color.  I love my hubby. We're going to either paint or put up a wall mural of the Tardis front door on the elevator door upstairs. 😀

 

interior of house.jpg

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Finished A Morbid Taste for Bones last night.  I just have to say I love Brother Cadfael, his personality and character. Will definitely go on to read more of the series.  Diving back into the Wheel of Time series with #11 Knife of Dreams.  It will take a while so sure I'll be taking side trips with other books.  

@Quill  Love your added Bingo choices.  Lots of fun! 

@Kareni  Glad you enjoyed Rivers of London series first book and I'll be joining you at some point in reading more of the series.  Thank you for all the wonderful links.

@hopeistheword I thoroughly enjoyed Forgotten Garden. Look forward to hearing your thoughts. Will drop by your blog soon.

@Mothersweets and @aggieamy I didn't know until I wrote the post last week that there was a tv series.  I'll be sure to check it out soon.  My sister told me about a series called The Librarian which I have yet to watch, but sounds really good as well.  Kind of along the Invisible Library, maybe, yes, no.  I'll find out.  Has anybody watched it?   

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@Penguin  Great to 'see' you.  I learn something new with your reads and when ever you post, I ended up following fascinating or educational rabbit trails. Thanks!

@brehon   Love hearing from you. Drop by anytime to reminisce. 

@melmichigan  Thanks, he's doing well.  Still working on my review of Wild Country. Now I want to reread Shards of Hope again.  Miss the psy/changeling world so guess I should dive back in soon. 

@Junie I know what you mean about the language in some books. Yet, the story line is so good, sometimes we just have to wade through the swamp to get to the ocean. Well worth it at times.   

@mumto2  How's Once Upon a River?  Melissa introduced me to Diane Setterfield way back when with her Thirteenth Tale. Not a book I'd normally choose to read but she made it sound so good and it was.  Started me on the road to reading more literary fiction. 

@purpleowl  I'm always surprised when I read the old stories like Black Beauty, probably because of the movies and I'm expected a happy ending and not so much sadness. 

@tuesdayschild I totally loved the Iain Pears art history mysteries. Fun and educational to boot. 

@SKL  Your post brought back so many enjoyable moments of watching Little House on the Prairie.  Lots of teaching moments by Pa.  

@Lady Florida. Glad to hear Emma is doing well. 

@Liz CA  Waving hi. Haven't read the Great Alone yet, so look forward to hearing what you think of it. 

 

 

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@Ravin  Glad you are still plugging away with your reads.   I loved George Carlin way back when although my parents made me wait until I was a lot older to actually watch or listen to him. Always had me in stitches, laughing so hard.

@mumto2  Just saw that you finished Once Upon a River. Will add it to my want list. 

@Kareni Thanks for sharing Bat Bomb. I think that's one everyone in our family will enjoy reading.  Saving it to my wishlist. 

@Negin  Thank you for sharing Humans of New York. I've heard quite a bit about it.  Happy to say I've been there once, rode the subways, took wild taxi rides, and wandered the streets in the middle of the night.  I'd like to go again sometime.  So much to see and do.

😘

 

Edited by Robin M
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1 hour ago, Robin M said:

Howdy, a bit busy finalizing flooring and lots of interior details for house. All the fun stuff.   Here's a picture. A bit messy and no flooring yet, but a good idea of downstairs color.  I love my hubby. We're going to either paint or put up a wall mural of the Tardis front door on the elevator door upstairs. 😀

 

interior of house.jpg

I love that shade of blue!  So glad the project appears to be finishing finally,  you have had so many problems along the way!

You will love Cadfael the tv series. It actually sticks fairly close to the books......Hubby and I tried the first episode of The Librarian on Prime a few months ago.  He wasn’t a fan 😕and while I thought it was pretty good I haven’t bothered to watch it on my own.  Let me know what you think of it.

Also glad for the recommendation for The Thirteenth Tale.  I plan to put it on my audio wish list for the future.  I have been first in line for the third book in The Expanse series on audio for about a month now and have the rest in suspension.  I believe they are all really long......So I am sticking to short audio books for my other listens until after I finish that series.  I started River Marked by Patricia Briggs today.......I had totally forgotten Mercy’s wedding.🥰. I also finally started Connections in Death on my Kindle.

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2 hours ago, Robin M said:

Howdy, a bit busy finalizing flooring and lots of interior details for house. All the fun stuff.   Here's a picture. A bit messy and no flooring yet, but a good idea of downstairs color.  I love my hubby. We're going to either paint or put up a wall mural of the Tardis front door on the elevator door upstairs. 😀

Yay for progress! It looks quite snazzy.

1 hour ago, mumto2 said:

I love that shade of blue!

And I was thinking it a shade of grey.  (One of fifty!)

1 hour ago, mumto2 said:

You will love Cadfael the tv series. It actually sticks fairly close to the books......

My husband and daughter watched the entire series with great pleasure when my daughter was studying that era in 8th grade.  I would assign movies and documentaries for my daughter to watch; my husband would watch with her so that she could discuss them with a parent (I only rarely watch movies). It became their thing and made for some great memories. 

Regards,

Kareni

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I just finished Ben Aaronovitch's Whispers Under Ground (Rivers of London 3)which I enjoyed.  @mumto2, there was indeed mention made of a bookcase. I'm now on the watch for more.

This is the blurb for the American book:

 "A WHOLE NEW REASON TO MIND THE GAP
 
It begins with a dead body at the far end of Baker Street tube station, all that remains of American exchange student James Gallagher—and the victim’s wealthy, politically powerful family is understandably eager to get to the bottom of the gruesome murder. The trouble is, the bottom—if it exists at all—is deeper and more unnatural than anyone suspects . . . except, that is, for London constable and sorcerer’s apprentice Peter Grant. With Inspector Nightingale, the last registered wizard in England, tied up in the hunt for the rogue magician known as “the Faceless Man,” it’s up to Peter to plumb the haunted depths of the oldest, largest, and—as of now—deadliest subway system in the world.

At least he won’t be alone. No, the FBI has sent over a crack agent to help. She’s young, ambitious, beautiful . . . and a born-again Christian apt to view any magic as the work of the devil. Oh yeah—that’s going to go well."

Odd. The FBI agent didn't strike me as born-again. Perhaps I missed something.

 Curiously, my very American library has the British publication. Let me see if I can find that blurb. Hmm, here is the Amazon UK blurb which is still different from the jacket flap of this book:

"Peter Grant is learning magic fast. And it's just as well - he's already had run-ins with the deadly supernatural children of the Thames and a terrifying killer in Soho. Progression in the Police Force is less easy. Especially when you work in a department of two. A department that doesn't even officially exist. A department that if you did describe it to most people would get you laughed at. And then there's his love life. The last person he fell for ended up seriously dead. It wasn't his fault, but still.

Now something horrible is happening in the labyrinth of tunnels that make up the tube system that honeycombs the ancient foundations of London. And delays on the Northern line is the very least of it. Time to call in the Met's Economic and Specialist Crime Unit 9, aka 'The Folly'. Time to call in PC Peter Grant, Britain's Last Wizard. "

Ahh, Goodreads has the blurb that is in my book:

"In Tufnell Park, North London, a pair of railway tracks dive under a school, taking trains to and from Kings Cross. Wet, filthy, dangerous. Lovely place. And one Sunday before Christmas a sweet (sort of) kid called Abigail took me and my long suffering colleague Lesley May down there to look for a ghost.

We found one.

And that was that, I thought, because come Monday I get to do some proper policing. Person Unknown has been stabbed to death on the tracks at Baker Street tube. Magic may have been involved. And sure enough, in the blood; vestigia, the tell-tale trail magic leaves.

Person Unknown turns out to be the son of a US senator and before you can say 'International incident'. FBI agent Kimberley Reynolds and her firmly held religious beliefs are on my case.

And down in the dark, in the tunnels of London's Underground, the buried rivers, the Victorian sewers, I'm hearing whispers of ancient arts and tortured, vengeful spirits..."

I'd say that the only thing that bothered me in this book was the abundant use of the phrase "me and so and so" as the subject of a sentence. I don't recall that from the first two books.  And I notice that Lesley appears to be spelled Leslie in the American books.

Regards,

Kareni

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6 hours ago, Kareni said:

I just finished Ben Aaronovitch's Whispers Under Ground (Rivers of London 3)which I enjoyed.  @mumto2, there was indeed mention made of a bookcase. I'm now on the watch for more.

This is the blurb for the American book:

 "A WHOLE NEW REASON TO MIND THE GAP
 
It begins with a dead body at the far end of Baker Street tube station, all that remains of American exchange student James Gallagher—and the victim’s wealthy, politically powerful family is understandably eager to get to the bottom of the gruesome murder. The trouble is, the bottom—if it exists at all—is deeper and more unnatural than anyone suspects . . . except, that is, for London constable and sorcerer’s apprentice Peter Grant. With Inspector Nightingale, the last registered wizard in England, tied up in the hunt for the rogue magician known as “the Faceless Man,” it’s up to Peter to plumb the haunted depths of the oldest, largest, and—as of now—deadliest subway system in the world.

At least he won’t be alone. No, the FBI has sent over a crack agent to help. She’s young, ambitious, beautiful . . . and a born-again Christian apt to view any magic as the work of the devil. Oh yeah—that’s going to go well."

Odd. The FBI agent didn't strike me as born-again. Perhaps I missed something.

 Curiously, my very American library has the British publication. Let me see if I can find that blurb. Hmm, here is the Amazon UK blurb which is still different from the jacket flap of this book:

"Peter Grant is learning magic fast. And it's just as well - he's already had run-ins with the deadly supernatural children of the Thames and a terrifying killer in Soho. Progression in the Police Force is less easy. Especially when you work in a department of two. A department that doesn't even officially exist. A department that if you did describe it to most people would get you laughed at. And then there's his love life. The last person he fell for ended up seriously dead. It wasn't his fault, but still.

Now something horrible is happening in the labyrinth of tunnels that make up the tube system that honeycombs the ancient foundations of London. And delays on the Northern line is the very least of it. Time to call in the Met's Economic and Specialist Crime Unit 9, aka 'The Folly'. Time to call in PC Peter Grant, Britain's Last Wizard. "

Ahh, Goodreads has the blurb that is in my book:

"In Tufnell Park, North London, a pair of railway tracks dive under a school, taking trains to and from Kings Cross. Wet, filthy, dangerous. Lovely place. And one Sunday before Christmas a sweet (sort of) kid called Abigail took me and my long suffering colleague Lesley May down there to look for a ghost.

We found one.

And that was that, I thought, because come Monday I get to do some proper policing. Person Unknown has been stabbed to death on the tracks at Baker Street tube. Magic may have been involved. And sure enough, in the blood; vestigia, the tell-tale trail magic leaves.

Person Unknown turns out to be the son of a US senator and before you can say 'International incident'. FBI agent Kimberley Reynolds and her firmly held religious beliefs are on my case.

And down in the dark, in the tunnels of London's Underground, the buried rivers, the Victorian sewers, I'm hearing whispers of ancient arts and tortured, vengeful spirits..."

I'd say that the only thing that bothered me in this book was the abundant use of the phrase "me and so and so" as the subject of a sentence. I don't recall that from the first two books.  And I notice that Lesley appears to be spelled Leslie in the American books.

Regards,

Kareni

Great quotes........I don’t remember the “born again” line so I am wondering if I am listening to the audiobook with the British version being read.......my audiobooks came from a US library.   Ben Aaronovitch has also written for TV (just looked Dr. Who, the 7th Doctor......a Dalek episode) and these books are particularly good on audio imo.  I know @JennW in SoCal recently listened to one and enjoyed it.  The dialogue really fits the character’s voices when listening which I think is why the “me and so and so” ...... maybe because Aaronovitch started with tv.

@Robin M. Are the walls in the photo blue gray or a dark gray?  When I zoom in Kareni’s right, they look more gray then I thought.  Either way the Tardis is going to look so cool!  

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On 3/31/2019 at 3:16 PM, Kareni said:

Some bookish posts ~

GREAT BOOKS ABOUT THE IMMIGRANT EXPERIENCE

https://bookriot.com/2019/03/19/books-about-the-immigrant-experience/

 

12 DELICIOUS DIABETIC COOKBOOKS

https://bookriot.com/2019/03/20/diabetic-cookbooks/

 

Pachinko, the book I'm reading for book club, is on that first list. Re diabetic cookbooks: Neither I nor anyone in the household has diabetes, insulin resistance, risk factors, etc. We have no need to follow a diet for diabetics. However, I often find that diabetic cookbooks have healthy recipes - low carb/good carbs, low sugar, lots of vegetables, etc. I have at least two supermarket recipe magazines targeted to people with diabetes. 

On 3/31/2019 at 7:04 PM, aggieamy said:

I love Brother Cadfael. It's a series my grandmother loved and she and I would sit on Sunday nights and watch him on PBS Mystery. I've since rediscovered him through audiobooks. Highly recommend listening to his books. Fantastic narrator and the writing is perfect for listening. I usually have to listen to the last hour at 2.5 speed because I HAVE TO KNOW WHAT'S GOING TO HAPPEN AND I CAN'T BE CALM. 

I had been watching the Brother Cadfael series but didn't start reading the books until @aggieamy sent me the first one from Audible*. I was listening until I reached number 16  and was surprised to find it was abridged. Apparently the last half dozen or so are only available on audio in abridged editions. I've tried and can't find unabridged. I keep meaning to just read those last books but never seem to get around to it. It saddens me though because I really enjoyed listening to this series.

*Audible allows you to give away as many copies of as many books as you want. However, the recipient can only get one free audio book, ever. I wasn't aware you could do that until Amy sent me the Brother Cadfael book and now I've sent a number of books to different friends. 

On 3/31/2019 at 9:34 PM, Junie said:

 

The other book I finished, which was recommended here, was Born a Crime by Trevor Noah.  Typically, I would have put this book down after just a few pages.  I really don't care for foul language at all -- anything worse that what would make it into a PG-13 movie and I'm done.  This book had so.much.cursing.  But, his story is incredible.  He is an engaging storyteller and I was fascinated by his childhood.  I feel like I got a glimpse of apartheid that I could never get anywhere else.

I listened to the audio book and am glad I did. The language doesn't bother me but I loved hearing Noah's story in his own voice. I agree that his story is incredible. 

On 3/31/2019 at 9:19 PM, brehon said:

 

Anyway, I’m sorry to intrude; I saw Brother Cadfael and was moved to reminisce about one of my favorite series.

 

You're not intruding. There are several people who only post every now and then. Feel free to pop in any time to talk about books you're reading or to join in whatever we happen to be discussing. (BTW, I love Derek Jacobi's Cadfael too.)

On 4/3/2019 at 11:53 AM, aggieamy said:

 

You and I seem to have the same taste in non-fiction so I'm eagerly awaiting your review on this!

For those who don't want to scroll back and look, this reply was in reference to The Ghost Map. If you like to read while you eat and if you have even a mildly sensitive stomach, don't read the early chapters while eating. There are detailed descriptions of how human waste was dealt with in Victorian London (hint: it was dumped anywhere), and what cholera does to the body. The chapters are titled as dates. I'm on what seems to be Chapter 3 and I think it's past that kind of thing now as it seems to be leaning more towards investigating how the outbreak began and how it spread.  

On 4/3/2019 at 1:36 PM, mumto2 said:

 

@aggieamy  Ds loved the original Boxcar author but announced he was done with the series like two chapters into the first with the ghost writer.  As the reader just remember Boxcar Children is so much better than Magic Treehouse......I think I read the first 20 of those out loud thanks to Target who displayed new releases a bit too proudly for my taste.  Both my kids loved those.....yes Dd found them first so many of those were read twice!

 

Dennis (ds 21) liked the first few Boxcar Children books but as they got away from the kids surviving on their own and put more emphasis on the mystery he lost interest (yes, this mystery lover was disappointed that her own child wasn't a mystery lover lol). For years he liked the kind of story where a kid or teen has to survive without adults. Even as he got older he read books like My Side of the Mountain and Hatchet. He loved the Magic Treehouse books and flew through them. 

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@Robin M a Tardis would be so cool!

 

13 hours ago, Robin M said:

My sister told me about a series called The Librarian which I have yet to watch, but sounds really good as well.  Kind of along the Invisible Library, maybe, yes, no.  I'll find out.  Has anybody watched it?   

 

12 hours ago, mumto2 said:

Hubby and I tried the first episode of The Librarian on Prime a few months ago.  He wasn’t a fan 😕and while I thought it was pretty good I haven’t bothered to watch it on my own.  Let me know what you think of it.

 

Bill and I tried to watch the Librarian too. It was on Hulu at the time. We wanted to like it but just couldn't get into it.

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6 hours ago, mumto2 said:

 

@Robin M. Are the walls in the photo blue gray or a dark gray?  When I zoom in Kareni’s right, they look more gray then I thought.  Either way the Tardis is going to look so cool!  

Morning. The color is blue gray.  Behr's Crystal Waters.  Don't think I had all the lights on in the foreground. Amazing how different light changes the color.  We tested it with several different light sources.  Hubby the engineer, quite entertained, dragging me into the garage, plugging in different shop lights. Cool, white, warm. Different Kelvins.  My poor eyes took a while to recover. 😀

Edited by Robin M
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I started reading 1966: The Year the Decade Exploded, a social history of 1966 told through the lens of the music. It is divided into 12 chapters, January through December. Each chapter talks about the #1 hits that month, musicians that were on the rise, the youth culture, and the current events. I am on April, and I would say it is limited to what was happening in (or relevant to, e.g. Vietnam) the USA and the UK. I'm really enjoying it, and I have started making a Spotify playlist to go along with it. 

@Robin M I thought of you while reading the January chapter!  One of the very first songs discussed is Simon & Garfunkel's "The Sound of Silence." It was the first #1 US song of 1966.

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3 hours ago, Penguin said:

I started reading 1966: The Year the Decade Exploded, a social history of 1966 told through the lens of the music. It is divided into 12 chapters, January through December. Each chapter talks about the #1 hits that month, musicians that were on the rise, the youth culture, and the current events. I am on April, and I would say it is limited to what was happening in (or relevant to, e.g. Vietnam) the USA and the UK. I'm really enjoying it, and I have started making a Spotify playlist to go along with it. 

@Robin M I thought of you while reading the January chapter!  One of the very first songs discussed is Simon & Garfunkel's "The Sound of Silence." It was the first #1 US song of 1966.

How neat and the book sounds quite interesting. Something my husband would love since he's so into music.  1966 is also the year my brother was born so a special year.  

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