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Resources for engineering-minded 6 year old?

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My daughter is 6.5 and in first grade this year. She's always been really into building stuff, but since she's had a ton of unstructured time this year, this has really blossomed. She's constantly putting together LEGO sets, making things out of cardboard/rubber bands/paper/whatever she can find, and in general, building stuff. 

Does anyone have any ideas for how to support this interest other than buying more and more LEGO sets? Are there cool books of projects to build that are fun and accessible to small kids? Right now, some of her contraptions don't function as intended (LEGO camera, anyone?) which doesn't seem to bother her, but I imagine as she gets older, she'll care about function more. 

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David Macaulay has a wonderful series of books on architecture and engineering. Start with Pyramid or City - those are most accessible for a younger child. 

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My engineering boys love to get idea books from the library.  Sometimes they make things exactly as the books suggests and other times they use general ideas and improvise.   The older boys especially like Mindstorms and Technic.  The younger ones use regular Legos.

Some other somewhat related things that they enjoy: Scratch programming (she might like the regular or junior version at her age), Snap Circuits, and Botley the coding robot.  They also like various 3D logic games, like Hide and Seek Pirates, IQ Fit, and Gravity Maze.

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I also have a six-year-old who is engineering-minded. These are his favorite books:

Any of the Lego Technic Idea Books (Isogawa). 

The Lego Neighborhood books (Lyles).

Any of the Cool Creations books (Kenney).

He also knows exactly where the arts & crafts books are in the children's room at the library, and he routinely checks out books on making puppets, origami, pop-up-books, etc.

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Have you looked at Makedo kits? My kids (now 8 and 6) got the basic tools and a bunch of extra screws in their Easter baskets last year and the basement has been full of crazy cardboard creations ever since.

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Tinker Crate

There is a teacher I've been eyeing on Outschool that does engineering courses for young kids. There were classes like how to take things apart safely and how to build with stuff around the house. I can't give a personal recommendation but do read the reviews.

If she reads well she might like the book "Amazing Leonardo da Vinci Inventions you can build yourself." This could be turned into an unit study too with history, art, and math. Sometimes local science museums or aviation museums will have da Vinci exhibits.

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We just signed up for Amazon's Stem Club.  It's $20 a month, and the items they receive are worth at least that!  My 5yo just got a roller coaster building/logic game that has been tons of fun!  If you log onto your account that day of the month (for me it's the 15th), you can cancel your order if you don't want the item or already have it.  You can also sign up for every 2 or 3 months instead of monthly.

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You might want to look into putting together a Jr. First Lego League team for her. I coached a team for 3 years for my son, and it was a truly rewarding experience for him.

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We, and everyone we have done this with, love love love the Destination Imagination Instant Challenges.  If you google this, you will get tons of them, but here's a page to get you started:

http://www.cre8iowa.org/resources/instant-challenge-library/  Look at the task-based list for building projects, but we enjoy both types.  

They are cheap.  We have a box set up with all of our popsicle sticks, pipe cleaners, plastic cups, etc, etc... most projects use the same basic materials.  Once a month or so, I host a handful of homeschooled kids for a friendly competition using the Instant Challenges and it is hands down THE MOST FUN EVER!!! according to the kids.  

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Thank you so much, everyone!! Sorry not to reply in detail to everyone, but I'm really looking forward to looking through all of your suggestions. Feeling a little overwhelmed life-wise right now, unfortunately... but these look great!! 

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Sometimes I just put out a box of wood scraps, nails, hammer, craft sticks, glue, ruler and just let him do whatever. Yesterday he put up a little wall and bench under his play tower.

We also have a box of electrical wires, wire clippers, led bulbs, alarm, batteries, magnets, etc. Kind of like snap circuits except he can build motors or simply use the stuff to design robots (that don't function). 

Does she like Legos? If so she might like Lego Creator. It's a computer application, free I believe, for digitally designing and testing creations.

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Fort Magic is a huge hit here. We have Keva planks but those don't get used nearly as much as FM.

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