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Robin M

Book a Week 2019 - BW12: March Equinox

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Happy Sunday and welcome to week twelve in our 52 Books rambling roads reading adventure. Greetings to all our readers, welcome to all who are joining in for the first time and everyone following our progress. Visit  52 Books in 52 Weeks where you can find all the information on the annual, mini and perpetual challenges, as well as the central spot to share links to your book reviews. 

 Nature is putting on a spectacular show as we transition into Spring in the Northern Hemisphere and Patricia Cisco's poem captures the season.  It's also Autumn in the southern Hemisphere with the season's fall leaves of orange and yellow and red.   I have John Denver's You Fill Up My Senses running through my head so your mission is find titles or stories that resonate with the sights, sounds, and/or smells of the season. Pick a word from the song, the poem, or one of the senses and have fun following rabbit trails to determine what book you’d like to read for Spring and/or Autumn depending on your location.



 

Song Of March

© Patricia L. Cisco

 With winter's footprints in the past,

and snows begin to melt at last.

 

 With longer days and shorter nights,

the wayward winds of March take flight.

 

Four winds she holds within her grip,

then hurls them from her fingertip.

 

Her woolly, fleecy clouds of white,

she sets in skies of blue delight.

 

Her wild bouts of gusty breezes

roar through valleys, hills, and trees.

 

That high pitch whistling song she sings

awakens earth and flowering things.

 

She tears a hole in heaven's sky

so sun can shine and rain can cry.

 

She gently calms as spring draws near,

as blooming daffodils appear.

 

She welcomes April showers in,

then gathers up her dwindling winds.

Now her long journey home begins,

 

knowing she'll be back this way,

upon a cold, late winter's day,

 

when nights grow short

and days grow long.

 

Listen for her whistling song!

 

What are you reading?

Link to week eleven

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Totally forgot it's St. Patrick's day and I'm half Irish.  😀

Still reading Wild Country and trying to decide which book I want to take me with on airplane on Thursday.  So hard to concentrate on planes so something I've already read probably. Hmm!

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Yesterday I read a novella that I quite liked. I recommend it to those who enjoy fairytale retellings as well as to those who might enjoy reading a male/male romance that has no explicit content. I will certainly be looking to see what this author next publishes.

 
 "An m/m World War II-era retelling of Beauty and the Beast.

During a chance summer shower, an English country parson takes refuge in a country house. The house seems deserted, yet the table is laid with a sumptuous banquet such as the parson has not seen since before war rationing. 

Unnerved by the uncanny house, he flees, but stops to pluck a single perfect rose from the garden for his daughter - only for the master of the house to appear, breathing fire with rage. Literally. 

At first, the parson can't stand this dragon-man. But slowly, he begins to feel the injustice of the curse that holds the dragon captive. What can break this vengeful curse?"

Regards,

Kareni

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1 hour ago, Robin M said:

Totally forgot it's St. Patrick's day and I'm half Irish.  😀

Still reading Wild Country and trying to decide which book I want to take me with on airplane on Thursday.  So hard to concentrate on planes so something I've already read probably. Hmm!

Yep either a reread for the plane or something fluffy.  I try to have several choices on my Kindle always........also try and start the book before........

I am finally almost done with my Inspector Gamache Reread.  I have Glass Houses ready to start and Overdrive predicts that I will have my hold on the new book within the next two weeks.  I may wait and read the last two back to back.

Since I am not listening to Gamache I went back to Rivers of London and the Most current Peter Grant.  I am enjoying it but VERY grateful for my recent series reread.  I suspect I would be really lost otherwise.

Books.....still working on Inspector Chen and reading the second Inspector Rebus for my Scotland challenge. Not loving the Rebus,  Hide and Seek is centered on the 90’s drug culture in Edinburgh which is blah.......but I loved the first and plan to read the third,  so on with the second!

Last week I read the first two Murderbot books by Martha Wells.  Really enjoyed them, both Dd and I are waiting for the third.......I also read the second in the Isabel Dalhousie by Alexander McCall Smith.  Friends, Lovers, and Chocolate was a lovely read,  I like Isabel. 😉

A couple of the books that I have in the stack for this week are The Au Pair (believe @Mothersweets mentionedthis one last week) and The Gown(the making of Elizabeth 2’s wedding gown).

 

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I read Rick Steves Spain 2019 - 5 Stars - Helpful Rick again, in preparation for our trip to Spain in May. 

9781631218408.jpg

MY RATING SYSTEM
5 Stars
The book is fantastic. It’s not perfect, since no book is, but it’s definitely a favorite of mine. 
4 Stars
Really Good
3 Stars
Enjoyable 
2 Stars
Just Okay – nothing to write home about
1 Star
Rubbish – waste of my money and time. Few books make it to this level, since I usually give up on them if they’re that bad.


 

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Hi everyone!

Yesterday I finished How to Find Love in a Bookshop by Veronica Henry and recommended here by Negin. It was sweet and a fluffy contemporary romance that I found enjoyable. Thanks Negin!

Mum, I ran out of time with The Au Pair and had to take it back to the library but I didn't mind as I was having a hard time getting into the story. You'll have to let me know what you end up thinking of it.

I've been reading The Poisonwood Bible on my kindle and am about 75% through it. The story is starting to drag for me but I'll push myself to finish as I've invested so much time in it already. Please tell me it is worth it!

Still reading a chapter or so of Strange & Norrell every few nights. 

Robin, the poem really made me "feel" March. 🙂

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Oh my STARS!  I just deleted my own long post.  😵

Let me start again.

Ahem.

This week I finished Digital Minimalism in audiobook and blogged about it.  I loved it!  It will in all likelihood be one of my Best of 2019 books.

I'm currently reading: 

  • The Penderwicks in Spring by Jeanne Birdsall aloud to my boys--this is the first Penderwicks book in the series I haven't read and I am enjoying it!
  • The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri--on my phone/Kindle app.  This is so good! I usually read it while I'm standing around waiting or while I'm drying my hair. Does anybody else do this?
  • A Long Obedience in the Same Direction by Eugene Peterson--continuing and trying to blog as I go, which slows me down
  • The Chosen by Chaim Potok--for dd14's school (re-read for me)
  • Farewell to Manzanar by Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston --for dd13's school
  • News of the World by Paulette Jiles--I went looking for an audiobook after finishing Digital Minimalism and found this one languishing in my Audible folder.  Engrossing!

I'm making a real effort to stay off the internet (thank you, Digital Minimalism 🤣) , so it might be next weekend before I'm here again.  Have a great week, everybody!

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Finished two books this week: 

24. The Three-Body Problem by Liu Cixin - for my SciFi book group, but on my recommendation because I'd heard so much about it here!  I enjoyed this alternative history / alien first encounter, and also the Chinese default cultural viewpoint - we're so used to any SciFi being from often not just a Western, but a US default cultural viewpoint, even the ones supposedly far in the future with people who have never even visited earth.  I've read enough Chinese literature that that viewpoint seemed familiar, but it was still nice to have some footnotes explaining some of the references Western audiences wouldn't be as familiar with. 3.5 stars.

25. Patient H.M.: A Story of Memory, Madness, and Family Secrets by Luke Dittrich (ebook) - I added this to my TR list ages ago after someone here read and recommended it.  It was quite the interesting mix of the history of psychosurgery and what was learned by the rather liberal use of it in the mid-20th century and the author's family story - his grandfather was the 2nd most prolific lobotomist in history (he was a neurosurgeon who did operations, the most prolific guy wasn't a surgeon at all and popularized the ice-pick through the eye socket and stir method).  Still, he really didn't know what he was doing, just mucking about to see what would happen in a more intentional way, and the vast majority of the patients were women who didn't conform to the feminine ideal (submissive, quiet, straight...) in some way.  But the book focuses the most on the epilepsy patient H.M. who had much of the middle of his brain removed (hypothalamus, medial temporal lobes), just in case it might stop his seizures.  It didn't, but it did make him lose all ability to make new memories, so he always lived in the present moment.  And the family story, about his grandfather the rather cavalier surgeon (who performed the surgery on H.M.), his grandmother who had a psychotic break and was repeatedly institutionalized, his mother's childhood best friend who by some coincidence grew up to become the gatekeeper and main researcher on H.M.  4 stars.

Just started Number9dream by David Mitchell and The Door by Magda Szabó (ebook), and still working on my two chunksters -  Moby-Dick on audio, and Patria in print.

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Hi, everyone. I missed most of last week's thread, but plan to go back and read it. I had houseguests from both Denmark and NC last week, which was quite wonderful. 

One of the highlights of the week was showing my Danish friend around Washington DC. This was her second trip to the USA, but first time on the East Coast. We did tons of things, but I want to talk a bit about the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture. This was my second time there, and both times I spent three hours...and did not have time to absorb everything.

My friend said it was one of the best museums she has ever visited, and I concur. Somehow, I managed to miss the Memorial to Emmett Till the first time. It is in a corner off the walking route, so unless you look at the map it is easy to miss. Emmett Till's body was exhumed in the 2000s, and the original casket is now the focus of a memorial room to him. It is a powerful exhibit, and now I really want to read The Blood of Emmett Till. 

Other reading notes: I started Doris Lessing's The Golden Notebook before my guests arrived. I got to about page 100 and found it meh. I had no desire to continue after setting it aside for a week. Instead, I have started The Goblin Emperor which I am loving so far.

@Quill You asked about cultural memoirs. You might like Cafe Europa: Life After Communism by Slavenka Drakulic. It is certainly not as lighthearted as The Year of Living Danishly, but I found it an insightful read. The author is Croatian, but the book roams around Europe a bit. Oh, and I also have Chesapeake Requiem on my TBR. If you read it, I would love to know your thoughts.

Edited by Penguin
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22 hours ago, Mothersweets said:

I've been reading The Poisonwood Bible on my kindle and am about 75% through it. The story is starting to drag for me but I'll push myself to finish as I've invested so much time in it already. Please tell me it is worth it!

Robin, the poem really made me "feel" March. 🙂

Yes, Poisonwood Bible is worth it to finish.  I loved the lessons the natives and life lessons taught Pierce family and the ramifications.  Keep swimming. Glad you liked the poem.  It did the same for me. 

Edited by Robin M
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That poem is perfect for March!

DS and I are starting a new read aloud tonight: Farmer Boy. It was one of my all time favorites growing up. DD had no interest in it so hopefully the little boy will. I'm hoping it will hold up to my expectations too. It was one of those books that I read dozens of times and just looking at the pictures brings back such deep sentimental feelings for me. 

 

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I’m finding it hard to select and settle on a new comfort read, so I may just pick up a known ‘friend’  from out of the trusted reads pile.  

Completed: 

  • 38:  Da Vinci's Ghost:  Genius, Obsession, and How Leonardo Created the World in His Own Image ~ Toby Lester, narrated by Stephen Hoye   (epukapuka audio) N/F  (not quite 3*)   https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/2743523097
  • 39:  Devil's Cub: Alastair Trilogy Bk2 ~ Georgette Heyer,  narrated by Michael Drew (3) So, why 3 stars after saying all this in a goodreads review?   Because, even though I really (!) dislike Dominic,  I still like GH’s writing style, her witty humour, and the chance to revisit with an older Justin.
  • 40:   Arawata Bill:  The Story of Legendary Gold Prospector William James O'Leary ~ Ian Dougherty  (3)   196pgs,  pub March 15th 2010.   N/F  NZ 
  • 41:  O=  A Grief Observed ~ C.S. Lewis  N/F Memoir (Christian Classic)  (5)   Poignant read. I’ve highlighted so many thoughts in this book, ones like these:    *Sorrow, however, turns out to be not a state but a process.       *Grief is like a long valley, a winding valley where any bend may reveal a totally new landscap.    *Praise is the mode of love which always has some element of joy in it. Praise in due order; of Him [God] as the giver, of her as the gift.

Currently reading/listening to:

  • Crime and Punishment ~ Fyodor Dostoevsky, Constance Garnett – translator, narrated by George Guidall  (audio 25hrs 1m)  Classic/ Chunkster/ Russia      I’m swapping between reading and listening which is the only way I can keep up with Ds;  this is the first of a few books he'd like me to buddy read with him this year.
  • The Last Moriarty:  Sherlock Holmes and Lucy James Bk1 ~ Charles Veley and Anna  Elliott narrated by  Edward Petherbridge     (Dd's request/recommendation, “Mum, please read this”.)

 

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3 hours ago, aggieamy said:

That poem is perfect for March!

DS and I are starting a new read aloud tonight: Farmer Boy. It was one of my all time favorites growing up. DD had no interest in it so hopefully the little boy will. I'm hoping it will hold up to my expectations too. It was one of those books that I read dozens of times and just looking at the pictures brings back such deep sentimental feelings for me. 

 

Dd8 is reading Farmer Boy (on her own) this week!

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Last week someone mentioned the Moby Dick audiobook.  I actually got to listen to the whole thing this weekend.  My dad is in the hospital in another state and I went (alone) to go visit him.  I needed something to listen to on a long car ride, so Moby Dick was perfect.  (The version I have is abridged and about 6 hours.)

I started Frankenstein and an Agatha Christie book (it's still packed -- I don't remember the title.)

I also read Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton .  I had never read this before.  I'm probably going to give it to dd16 tomorrow.  It is a beautifully written story about race relations in South Africa in the 1940s.  It very much reminded me of Pearl S. Buck's The Good Earth, just in another time and another place.

 

 

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I missed a few weeks I think.

DD passed her English Written retake, attended German Written yesterday and we just made a studyplan for Maths and Science in April&May.

I became board member of a ladies choir and that fulfills the hole 'almost done with homeschooling' left.

So some weeks I hardly read...

I finished 'through te glasses of Chekhov' a book that travels through Russia along Chekhovs books and letters.

I also finished 'Woman behind the piano' about Female Composers.

My currently reads are:

Days without End

The sound and the fury

both slightly too hard to read before bedtime

My Lent reading is:

'Fragile Alleluia' about the pelgrim psalms. I learned from past years and picked a book that isn't divided in a reading per day, but just fits in the season.

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On 3/17/2019 at 7:18 PM, Mothersweets said:

Hi everyone!

Yesterday I finished How to Find Love in a Bookshop by Veronica Henry and recommended here by Negin. It was sweet and a fluffy contemporary romance that I found enjoyable. Thanks Negin!

I've been reading The Poisonwood Bible on my kindle and am about 75% through it. The story is starting to drag for me but I'll push myself to finish as I've invested so much time in it already. Please tell me it is worth it!

Happy to hear that you liked it!

I read "The Poisonwood Bible" a few years ago and liked it very much. One of the daughters, the shallow/pretty one, I believe, cracked me up every time the chapter was about her. I laugh at things like that. Mind you, I laugh at pretty much anything! 

 

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I finally finished Martin Luther's Basic Theological Writings , woohoo! I particularly enjoyed reading what Luther had to say about the importance of classical languages, because it reminded me of discussions I've read on these boards. 🙂 

Also last week, I read the young readers' edition of Hidden Figures as a pre-read for my girls. It fits beautifully with our studies in both history (last several chapters of SOTW 4) and science (astronomy, with a visit to the Kennedy Space Center planned), so I think I'll have them read it. 

Current read is a Puritan Paperback, John Bunyan on Prayer (actually two works in one volume).

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On 3/17/2019 at 6:18 PM, Mothersweets said:

 

Mum, I ran out of time with The Au Pair and had to take it back to the library but I didn't mind as I was having a hard time getting into the story. You'll have to let me know what you end up thinking of it

 

I ended up reading The Au Pair yesterday and found it to be a page turner.  It also read very quickly but I was up very late finishing it!

 I actually started it because I needed to do something with a few minutes that I needed to wait for my husband said he needed to get ready to go out and I thought I might very well read a few pages and be able to return the book.  He was longer than the promised few minutes and I had gotten far enough to need to continue.

  The first couple of chapters were not the best but after that the book’s gothic elements come together with the mansion on the cliffs taking on it’s own life with a village mythology that says the twin children born there do not survive.......the village wisdom said perhaps one or both of the twins is a “sprite” or changeling 🤔  The circumstances surrounding their birth feel odd.  Unanswered questions and quite a tangle.  The book switches between the present day search by one of the twins to learn why their mother is only holding one unidentified baby in a photo taken after their birth and flashbacks that are narrated by the family’s au pair covering the months leading up to the birth.  Every time I thought I had it figured out, I didn’t.😂 

Update on Goodreads exclusive shelves.......this book was not able to be put both on my read shelf and the Brit Tripping Ideas shelf so Brit Tripping ideas is just a shelf again.  I think I need my read shelf to be accurate fo my tracking of challenges.  This book was mainly set in Norfolk with trips to London and Leeds(Yorkshire).

in my effort to decrease the stack(library trip planned for today) I also read a few pages of Vita Nostra since I no longer knew why I had checked it out.  It appears to be a keeper..........Ukrainian translation, which I am not sure I have read before, plus an awesome cover.  https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/3972188-vita-nostra. Something I read in the reviews calls it a dark Harry Potter........  I noticed our  BaWer @Angelaboord gave it 5* and a great review....that tag is missing her photo so I may have the wrong one but see no other.......

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I missed posting Week 11, but I've finished a fair bit of reading!

My overall reading goals are to take in a mix of fiction and nonfiction, spiritually enriching, informative, and fun selections; to keep up with the Druid book discussion/study group I'm in, to put eyes on words not related directly to work more often than last year, and to read books that I bought ages ago and still haven't read.

My currently reading list:

The Broken Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin on Audible. I have 7 hours and 5 minutes left. Just under halfway through the book

The Táin translated by Ciaran Carson Update: no progress. In my defense, the whole book study group I'm reading it with has been on temporary hiatus because of work and stuff.

Odin: Ecstasy, Runes & Norse Magic by Diana L. Paxson (this is one of those "bought ages ago and still haven't read" books) Reading on Kindle. I haven't made progress on this one in the last couple of weeks.

George Carlin Reads to You by George Carlin. Still only listening when riding in the car with my co-worker. There's 31 minutes left on the audiobook. 

Next Up:

I still feel like I need to finish some more of my current reading list before I go looking for more, but the following have been added to my "want to read" list:

The Uninhabitable Earth by Davis Wallace-Wells (This will fit the "science" category of my 10x10 challenge).

Digital Minimalism by Cal Newport 

My 10x10 challenge categories:

1. humor Tough Sh*t definitely qualified!

2. science (nonfiction)

3. fantasy & science fiction by new-to-me authors (Thank you to those who made suggestions, I'll be going back to refer to them later!)

4. LGBT

5. classic fiction

6. folklore (The Táin will satisfy this)

7. religion (nonfiction) (Odin: Ecstasy, Runes & Norse Magic by Diana L. Paxson will satisfy this)

8. law (nonfiction)

9. modern fiction in translation (i.e., originally published in a language other than English)

10. books by women of color (Stone Sky met this requirement)

The books must of course all be separate selections, though they may fit into more than one category, they cannot be used for more than one, so that I read 10 books for it.

Books I've read for the 52 books in 52 weeks challenge this year (most recently completed first):

6. Tough Sh*t: Life Advice from a Fat, Lazy Slob Who Did Good by Kevin Smith (on audiobook, read by the author). Started this one AND finished it last week. 

5. The Stand (unabridged) by Stephen King (on audiobook).  Finished last week!

4. Akata Warrior by Nnedi Okorafor Finished since my last post!

3. American Like Me by America Ferrera. 

2. The Stone Sky by N.K. Jemisin (third book in the Broken Earth series) 

1. The Sky-Blue Wolves by S. M. Stirling 

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For my book group which is meeting tomorrow, I read Amor Towles' A Gentleman in Moscow: A Novel which I very much enjoyed. I'm looking forward to our discussion.

 "He can’t leave his hotel. You won’t want to. 

From the New York Times bestselling author of Rules of Civility—a transporting novel about a man who is ordered to spend the rest of his life inside a luxury hotel. 

In 1922, Count Alexander Rostov is deemed an unrepentant aristocrat by a Bolshevik tribunal, and is sentenced to house arrest in the Metropol, a grand hotel across the street from the Kremlin. Rostov, an indomitable man of erudition and wit, has never worked a day in his life, and must now live in an attic room while some of the most tumultuous decades in Russian history are unfolding outside the hotel’s doors. Unexpectedly, his reduced circumstances provide him entry into a much larger world of emotional discovery. 

Brimming with humor, a glittering cast of characters, and one beautifully rendered scene after another, this singular novel casts a spell as it relates the count’s endeavor to gain a deeper understanding of what it means to be a man of purpose."

 I see that this is to be made into a television series-- interesting.

***

I also reread a favorite novella which I enjoyed once again --   Sarina Bowen's   Blonde Date (Ivy Years 2.5)

Regards,

Kareni

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16 hours ago, mumto2 said:

@Robin M Wishing you a safe flight!  Have a great time at the party!

 

2 hours ago, Kareni said:

Safe travels and happy reading, Robin.

Regards,

Kareni

Thanks, ladies.  It's been a crazy week .  Knocking heads with contractor over interior colors among other things.  Grrr!  Tomorrow is travel day and I'll check back in on Sunday when post the new thread.  

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On 3/18/2019 at 7:50 PM, tuesdayschild said:

 

  • 39:  Devil's Cub: Alastair Trilogy Bk2 ~ Georgette Heyer,  narrated by Michael Drew (3) So, why 3 stars after saying all this in a goodreads review?   Because, even though I really (!) dislike Dominic,  I still like GH’s writing style, her witty humour, and the chance to revisit with an older Justin.
  •  

 

 

My least favorite GH book. I only gave it two stars but I can agree with your reasoning. 🙂

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Farmer Boy is a fail for DS. He loved Boxcar Children and wants something exactly like that for me to read to him. Ugh. I think he's just a little two young for the story. I love all the food descriptions but he's bored with it. I even tried editing on the fly but it's no-go. 

I'm a bit bummed.

We'll try Henry Huggins tonight. 

I've finished my tenth (at least!) reread of The Great Gatsby. Loved it as always. But I remember we had some heated discussion on here last time I read it. 

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7 minutes ago, aggieamy said:

Farmer Boy is a fail for DS. He loved Boxcar Children and wants something exactly like that for me to read to him. Ugh. I think he's just a little two young for the story. I love all the food descriptions but he's bored with it. I even tried editing on the fly but it's no-go. 

I'm a bit bummed.

We'll try Henry Huggins tonight. 

I've finished my tenth (at least!) reread of The Great Gatsby. Loved it as always. But I remember we had some heated discussion on here last time I read it. 

So far he tracks with my DS........Have you already read Mrs. Piggle Wiggle?

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Audiobooks:

"Regency" still listening and wrapping this one up. Found very interesting things here.

"The Entitlement Cure" by John Townsend. He is usually good and this is no different.

Next Audiobook will be:

"Venetia" by Georgette Heyer

 

Reading:

"The Devil's Triangle" by Coulter/Ellison. Fast paced crime as I like it. Almost done with it...all the villains are dead. 🙂

Next one will be "The End Game" by same authors

Also have the "Quiet Gentleman" by Heyer still on Overdrive - maybe I'll get to him before Overdrive snatches him back.

 

Edited by Liz CA
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Last night I finished a science fiction book that had an Australian aboriginal component; I enjoyed it and look forward to reading the next book in the trilogy.

 "Lieutenant Jodenny Scott is a hero. She has the medals and the scars to prove it.

She's cooling her heels on Kookaburra, recovering from injuries sustained during the fiery loss of her last ship, the Yangtze, and she's bored -- so bored, in fact, that she takes a berth on the next ship out. That's a mistake. The Aral Sea isn't anyone's idea of a get-well tour.

Jodenny's handed a division full of misfits, incompetents, and criminals. She's a squared-away officer. She thinks she can handle it all. She's wrong. Aral Sea isn't a happy ship. And it's about to get a lot unhappier.

As Aral Sea enters the Alcheringa -- the alien-constructed space warp that allows giant settler-ships to travel between worlds, away from all help or hope -- Jodenny comes face to face something powerful enough to dwarf even the unknown force that destroyed her last ship and left her with missing memories and bloody nightmares. Lieutenant Jodenny Scott is about to be introduced to love.

Author Sandra McDonald brings her personal knowledge of the military, and of the subtle interplay between men and women on deployment, to a stirring tale that mixes ancient Australian folklore with the colonization of the stars. "

Regards,

Kareni

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19 hours ago, mumto2 said:

So far he tracks with my DS........Have you already read Mrs. Piggle Wiggle?

Pulling that one off my shelf to try tonight. I'm not trying to push him to listening to chapter books ... we still do tons of picture books but I just love having a story to come back to every night. DD loved everything and this guy is pickier.

4 hours ago, Nan in Mass said:

I am reading Busman's Honeymoon.  For the umpteenth time. : )

Nan

*heart* One of my favorite Lord Peter stories. I probably know the answer but have you attempted any of the "new" Lord Peter books such as Thrones, Dominations?

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On 3/19/2019 at 8:02 AM, mumto2 said:

 

in my effort to decrease the stack(library trip planned for today) I also read a few pages of Vita Nostra since I no longer knew why I had checked it out.  It appears to be a keeper..........Ukrainian translation, which I am not sure I have read before, plus an awesome cover.  https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/3972188-vita-nostra. Something I read in the reviews calls it a dark Harry Potter........  I noticed our  BaWer @Angelaboord gave it 5* and a great review....that tag is missing her photo so I may have the wrong one but see no other.......

Yes, that was me! I loved Vita Nostra. It’s dark and philosophical, so maybe not everyone’s cup of tea when it comes to fantasy but it really hooked me. They have one other book translated into English called The Scar, which I also loved, but it’s very different than Vita Nostra.  

As for myself, life this year has been kind of tough. I haven’t been doing a lot of reading, although I’ve been doing more lately because of severe sciatica trouble which has resulted in a couple of ER visits and a lot of nights unable to sleep. I read the first Murderbot book last week as well as Josiah Bancroft’s The Hod King. That’s book 3 in the Books of Babel series, which I *highly* recommend. Now I’m reading a novella called Rough Passages by KM Herkes. It’s superhero fantasy, I guess - kind of a SF/fantasy mix. A virus gives people superpowers, usually when they reach middle age. They’re discriminated against but that doesn’t stop people from using their abilities. What makes this novella different is the ages of many of the characters. The first character introduced is a 42 year old single mom of 2 toddler boys who also takes care of her aging mother. I’m enjoying it. 

I’m also about 30% into Rage of Dragons by Evan Winter. Only the ebook is available right now, so I don’t know if it’s the self-published version or if it will change when Orbit brings it out later this year. It’s an African (Xhosa) inspired fantasy. Unique world, unique magic, but the first 30% is mostly one battle/fight scene after another. It’s a little exhausting. ☺️

 

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34 minutes ago, Angelaboord said:

Yes, that was me! I loved Vita Nostra. It’s dark and philosophical, so maybe not everyone’s cup of tea when it comes to fantasy but it really hooked me. They have one other book translated into English called The Scar, which I also loved, but it’s very different than Vita Nostra.  

As for myself, life this year has been kind of tough. I haven’t been doing a lot of reading, although I’ve been doing more lately because of severe sciatica trouble which has resulted in a couple of ER visits and a lot of nights unable to sleep. I read the first Murderbot book last week as well as Josiah Bancroft’s The Hod King. That’s book 3 in the Books of Babel series, which I *highly* recommend. Now I’m reading a novella called Rough Passages by KM Herkes. It’s superhero fantasy, I guess - kind of a SF/fantasy mix. A virus gives people superpowers, usually when they reach middle age. They’re discriminated against but that doesn’t stop people from using their abilities. What makes this novella different is the ages of many of the characters. The first character introduced is a 42 year old single mom of 2 toddler boys who also takes care of her aging mother. I’m enjoying it. 

I’m also about 30% into Rage of Dragons by Evan Winter. Only the ebook is available right now, so I don’t know if it’s the self-published version or if it will change when Orbit brings it out later this year. It’s an African (Xhosa) inspired fantasy. Unique world, unique magic, but the first 30% is mostly one battle/fight scene after another. It’s a little exhausting. ☺️

 

I passed the halfway point in Vita Nostra and am totally enthralled.  It is very different but I am so curious to find out what happens!  I thought The Scar was the second part and was planning to read it soon.  I think I am glad to know that I will reach the end with this book because I thought there was an untranslated part three too! 🤣

I just picked up the third Murderbot.  I love this series!  I tried to read  Senlin Ascends when it first came out but only read a few pages.  It was one of those that needed to go back to the library and you now have me wondering if I should try again....

Hugs regarding the sciatica.  I know how much it hurts! I am sure you have tried everything but a very flat pillow and lying flat on my back helped me sleep, sort of........

9 hours ago, aggieamy said:

Pulling that one off my shelf to try tonight. I'm not trying to push him to listening to chapter books ... we still do tons of picture books but I just love having a story to come back to every night. DD loved everything and this guy is pickier.

*heart* One of my favorite Lord Peter stories. I probably know the answer but have you attempted any of the "new" Lord Peter books such as Thrones, Dominations?

So how was Mrs. Piggle Wiggle?  We read all the Boxcar Children by the original author.....first eleven I think..... he enjoyed every single one but hated the new author.  

I almost hate to admit this but I know I liked one of the new Lord Peter’s quite a bit.😉

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9 hours ago, aggieamy said:

Pulling that one off my shelf to try tonight. I'm not trying to push him to listening to chapter books ... we still do tons of picture books but I just love having a story to come back to every night. DD loved everything and this guy is pickier.

*heart* One of my favorite Lord Peter stories. I probably know the answer but have you attempted any of the "new" Lord Peter books such as Thrones, Dominations?


What about Mr. Popper's Penguins? Or the Freddy the Pig books? Or some of the Lynn Reid Banks books such as I, Houdini (an escape artist hamster)?

I may have to pull some Lord Peter stories off the shelf and settle in for some lovely rereading. I haven't been brave enough to try any of the "new" ones...

@mumto2 I just finished listening to the first of the Rivers of London series. I've read the series in print up through Hanging Tree, but thanks to ds the first book is in our Audible library. I liked the narrator so much I just downloaded Lies Sleeping to listen to. Have you read any of the graphic novels or novellas? 

And, lol, I just looked up the Murderbot series on Goodreads and I've clearly had my head in the sand. EVERYONE has read at least the first one in the series. 

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3 minutes ago, JennW in SoCal said:


What about Mr. Popper's Penguins? Or the Freddy the Pig books? Or some of the Lynn Reid Banks books such as I, Houdini (an escape artist hamster)?

I may have to pull some Lord Peter stories off the shelf and settle in for some lovely rereading. I haven't been brave enough to try any of the "new" ones...

@mumto2 I just finished listening to the first of the Rivers of London series. I've read the series in print up through Hanging Tree, but thanks to ds the first book is in our Audible library. I liked the narrator so much I just downloaded Lies Sleeping to listen to. Have you read any of the graphic novels or novellas? 

And, lol, I just looked up the Murderbot series on Goodreads and I've clearly had my head in the sand. EVERYONE has read at least the first one in the series. 

I hope you are feeling better!

Actually, I just finished listening to Lies Sleeping this week.  I enjoyed it but will admit I am so very glad I just reviewed the whole series.  I read them all so quickly the details didn’t really stick so it was nice to follow along easily.   Btw,  I liked the ending quite a bit!

I think I told Dd that you recommended Murderbot!  🤔🤣. I thought it was one of your convention purchases...... They are quick and different, I think you will like them.

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21 minutes ago, mumto2 said:

I hope you are feeling better!

Actually, I just finished listening to Lies Sleeping this week.  I enjoyed it but will admit I am so very glad I just reviewed the whole series.  I read them all so quickly the details didn’t really stick so it was nice to follow along easily.   Btw,  I liked the ending quite a bit!

I think I told Dd that you recommended Murderbot!  🤔🤣. I thought it was one of your convention purchases...... They are quick and different, I think you will like them.


I was just reviewing the series via a fan page (Follypedia, I think) so I wouldn't be too lost in Lies Sleeping. They are all on my shelves, but I'm too impatient to reread them all before starting Lies Sleeping. 

And, nope, don't think I had heard about Murderbot before people starting writing reviews here. But my brain is enough of a foggy muddle that it is entirely possible I recommended it then forgot the series entirely🤣. In any case, I just bought the kindle edition of the first one and will probably get to it in the next week. 

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1 hour ago, mumto2 said:

I passed the halfway point in Vita Nostra and am totally enthralled.  It is very different but I am so curious to find out what happens!  I thought The Scar was the second part and was planning to read it soon.  I think I am glad to know that I will reach the end with this book because I thought there was an untranslated part three too! 🤣

I just picked up the third Murderbot.  I love this series!  I tried to read  Senlin Ascends when it first came out but only read a few pages.  It was one of those that needed to go back to the library and you now have me wondering if I should try again... 

I think Vita Nostra *is* part of a series, but fortunately it’s complete enough to stand alone. Who knows when or if the rest of the series will be translated. The Scar is actually a stand-alone in a completely different series. It’s almost like fairy tale. 

And yes, I would definitely give Senlin Ascends another chance! I put it down for a while in the beginning but after Senlin actually gets into the Tower I couldn’t stop reading. The Arm of the Sphinx (2) and The Hod King (3) I also did the beginnings slowly, but mostly so I could process emotions for the characters. Some of the things that have happened in that series really ripped my heart out. 

I think I will probably get the next Murderbot novellas, too. I’m amazed it took me this long to get around to reading one! I saw that Martha Wells is working on a Murderbot novel now, but I’m not sure when it’s coming out. 

 

 

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18 hours ago, aggieamy said:

Pulling that one off my shelf to try tonight. I'm not trying to push him to listening to chapter books ... we still do tons of picture books but I just love having a story to come back to every night. DD loved everything and this guy is pickier.

*heart* One of my favorite Lord Peter stories. I probably know the answer but have you attempted any of the "new" Lord Peter books such as Thrones, Dominations?

I haven't.  I've tried a few new authors of old favourites and didn't like them very enough to continue reading them, so I haven't tried with Lord Peter.  They feel like they lack something, if the writer had a specific style, as most of the ones I've tried do.  I think I dislike continuations that are continuations of an author whose writing style or characters I love, and sometimes like continuations of worlds that I love.  Those might be easier to carry off and have the potential to be even better than the original. In some ways, I think the idea of a world or characters taking on a life of their own is the best possible outcome for a story one has begun.

Nan

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I finished The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri this morning.  I gave it 4 stars, rounded up from 3.5 stars, on Goodreads. I found the story, the characters, and the style of writing positively fascinating, but explicit s** is one of the things I dislike greatly in my books.  

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10 hours ago, Angelaboord said:

I think Vita Nostra *is* part of a series, but fortunately it’s complete enough to stand alone. Who knows when or if the rest of the series will be translated. The Scar is actually a stand-alone in a completely different series. It’s almost like fairy tale. 

And yes, I would definitely give Senlin Ascends another chance! I put it down for a while in the beginning but after Senlin actually gets into the Tower I couldn’t stop reading. The Arm of the Sphinx (2) and The Hod King (3) I also did the beginnings slowly, but mostly so I could process emotions for the characters. Some of the things that have happened in that series really ripped my heart out. 

I think I will probably get the next Murderbot novellas, too. I’m amazed it took me this long to get around to reading one! I saw that Martha Wells is working on a Murderbot novel now, but I’m not sure when it’s coming out. 

 

 

I just discovered my library has Senlin Ascends as an audiobook as well as a kindle copy.  I will try listening to it soon as frequently having the first few chapters read to me Is easier.  I don’t quit many audiobooks for content,  audiobooks I quit because of the narration.😉  I am positive I didn’t get into the tower before I quit.

I also looked at Goodreads this morning and it says 2020 for the Murderbot novel.  I am curious but have to admit I think I like the shorter novella style for these books.  The stories are rather streamlined which fits the character imo, saying this while realizing the first two could have easily been published as one combined book.  The shorter style has advantages in terms of making people like my Ds at least curious.  He who rarely reads anymore due to time constraints .......I like to think it’s lack of time.  He almost took All systems Red when his sister tried to hand it to him........

@JennW in SoCal I forgot to answer the Peter Grant Novella part of your question last night.......I haven’t tried the graphic novels or novellas yet.  Several are availiable from my Overdrive but I haven’t taken the time to sort the new from the old etc.  Have you tried any of them?  If I am going to read them I probably should probably give it a go soon while I still remember who is who fairly well!

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I just finished book 26 for the year, an audiobook of News of the World by Paulette Jiles. 

Here’s the description:

“In the aftermath of the Civil War, an aging itinerant news reader agrees to transport a young captive of the Kiowa back to her people in this exquisitely rendered, morally complex, multilayered novel of historical fiction from the author of Enemy Women that explores the boundaries of family, responsibility, honor, and trust.

In the wake of the Civil War, Captain Jefferson Kyle Kidd travels through northern Texas, giving live readings from newspapers to paying audiences hungry for news of the world. An elderly widower who has lived through three wars and fought in two of them, the captain enjoys his rootless, solitary existence.

In Wichita Falls, he is offered a $50 gold piece to deliver a young orphan to her relatives in San Antonio. Four years earlier, a band of Kiowa raiders killed Johanna’s parents and sister; sparing the little girl, they raised her as one of their own. Recently rescued by the U.S. army, the ten-year-old has once again been torn away from the only home she knows.

Their 400-mile journey south through unsettled territory and unforgiving terrain proves difficult and at times dangerous. Johanna has forgotten the English language, tries to escape at every opportunity, throws away her shoes, and refuses to act “civilized.” Yet as the miles pass, the two lonely survivors tentatively begin to trust each other, forming a bond that marks the difference between life and death in this treacherous land.

Arriving in San Antonio, the reunion is neither happy nor welcome. The captain must hand Johanna over to an aunt and uncle she does not remember—strangers who regard her as an unwanted burden. A respectable man, Captain Kidd is faced with a terrible choice: abandon the girl to her fate or become—in the eyes of the law—a kidnapper himself.”

I LOVED this one!  I was practically sobbing by the end.  It will definitely make my Best of 2019 list!  

 

 

 

Edited by hopeistheword
Can’t figure out how to block quote on my phone
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22 hours ago, Angelaboord said:

yes, I would definitely give Senlin Ascends another chance! I put it down for a while in the beginning but after Senlin actually gets into the Tower I couldn’t stop reading.

I'm another one who didn't get far into the book before abandoning it. Like mumto2, I may need to give it another try.

1 hour ago, hopeistheword said:

I just finished book 26 for the year, an audiobook of News of the World by Paulette Jiles.

...

I LOVED this one!  I was practically sobbing by the end.  It will definitely make my Best of 2019 list!  

I read that for my book group last year and quite enjoyed it, too.  Others here have also read it.

Regards,

Kareni

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