Jump to content

Menu

College Suggestions for my DD?


Recommended Posts

My dd and I are trying to finalize a list of schools for her to apply to.  Please help if you have any suggestions!

Most important is she’d like to be with very dedicated, engaged students, but does not want a high pressure, cut-throat atmosphere.

She’s interested in business and pre-med

Other preferences -

- smaller school with a tight knit community 

- not right in the middle of a big city

- campus where conservatives are welcome

- cooler climate (not Georgia! at least)

Her SAT score is high and we can pay our EFC.  We are in Virginia and she’d like to be somewhere on this side of the country.

Edited by Mom0012
Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you looked at Colleges that Change Lives?  There might be a few schools in there that fit your needs.  There are some uber liberal campuses and some conservative ones.  Hillsdale (in Michigan) comes to mind as far as a more conservative campus and I think they have generous aid packages.  Hope College is another one - in Michigan as well and has generous merit aid for good stats.  My oldest went there, and, during our college search with my youngest, we found that it is leaning more conservative than when my son went there.  I love that school (and dh and I loved the finances), but DD found it too conservative for her taste.  Not as conservative as Hillsdale, though.  

I am sure that there are many more.  But that is a start.  

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
54 minutes ago, Mom0012 said:

My dd and I are trying to finalize a list of schools for her to apply to.  Please help if you have any suggestions!

Most important is she’d like to be with very dedicated, engaged students, but does not want a high pressure, cut-throat atmosphere.

She’s interested in business and pre-med

Other preferences -

- smaller school with a tight knit community 

- not right in the middle of a big city

- campus where conservatives are welcome

- cooler climate (not Georgia! at least)

Her SAT score is high and we can pay our EFC.  We are in Virginia and she’d like to be somewhere on this side of the country.

Our experience with our kids is that your first 2 criteria are found on most college campuses BUT the student is the one that is in the driver's seat of finding peers.  Kids can be on a small campus and still not have a strong friend group or not fit in with the group of peers that they are seeking.  Same is true on a large campus.  However, what my kids have found is that on a larger campus there are more people and therefore more people with similar interests.  My dd had thought she wanted a small campus but quickly realized that she felt way more like an outsider on a small campus than on a larger campus.

In terms of a campus where conservatives are welcome, that is the filter I would investigate closely.  We have been told over and over and over that campuses are open to all views, etc, but when you dig into the atmosphere on campus, you can see where conservative views are not welcome (even on some religious campuses).  Unfortunately based on your climate comment, by far the South is going to have the more welcoming conservative campuses.  In terms of pre-med, that is another filter I would research thoroughly.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, dirty ethel rackham said:

Have you looked at Colleges that Change Lives?  There might be a few schools in there that fit your needs.  There are some uber liberal campuses and some conservative ones.  Hillsdale (in Michigan) comes to mind as far as a more conservative campus and I think they have generous aid packages.  Hope College is another one - in Michigan as well and has generous merit aid for good stats.  My oldest went there, and, during our college search with my youngest, we found that it is leaning more conservative than when my son went there.  I love that school (and dh and I loved the finances), but DD found it too conservative for her taste.  Not as conservative as Hillsdale, though.  

I am sure that there are many more.  But that is a start.  

I did read that book when my ds was applying to colleges and found it helpful.  I will have to check it out again, but one of my concerns is that it is getting pretty dated.  Still, it is a good resource.  We did visit Hillsdale and dd liked it, but wasn’t super excited about it.  She doesn’t have to be an ultra conservative college, but she wants to have the freedom to discuss different viewpoints and feel like she doesn’t have to hide her own.

I will check out Hope College.  Thank you!

Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, 8FillTheHeart said:

Our experience with our kids is that your first 2 criteria are found on most college campuses BUT the student is the one that is in the driver's seat of finding peers.  Kids can be on a small campus and still not have a strong friend group or not fit in with the group of peers that they are seeking.  Same is true on a large campus.  However, what my kids have found is that on a larger campus there are more people and therefore more people with similar interests.  My dd had thought she wanted a small campus but quickly realized that she felt way more like an outsider on a small campus than on a larger campus.

In terms of a campus where conservatives are welcome, that is the filter I would investigate closely.  We have been told over and over and over that campuses are open to all views, etc, but when you dig into the atmosphere on campus, you can see where conservative views are not welcome (even on some religious campuses).  Unfortunately based on your climate comment, by far the South is going to have the more welcoming conservative campuses.  In terms of pre-med, that is another filter I would research thoroughly.

That is an interesting thought about smaller colleges vs larger ones.  We have visited Liberty and VCU a couple of years ago and she’s participated in a summer enrichment camp at UVA for a number of years. VCU was out immediately for her because of location.  She does not want to be at an evangelical college like Liberty because even though we share many values with people in that religion, we don’t share the religion and it leaves her feeling on the outside.  Catholic would be fine and probably good, I think. She loved her time at camp at UVA, but has reservations about It because she thinks it will be quite liberal.

How do you dig into the atmosphere beyond visiting campuses?  One thing we’ve found somewhat helpful is reading the school newspaper.  We’ve also read school reviews by students online and feel like we can get a “flavor” for the school that way.  Is there anything else I’m missing in figuring out atmosphere?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Mom0012 said:

That is an interesting thought about smaller colleges vs larger ones.  We have visited Liberty and VCU a couple of years ago and she’s participated in a summer enrichment camp at UVA for a number of years. VCU was out immediately for her because of location.  She does not want to be at an evangelical college like Liberty because even though we share many values with people in that religion, we don’t share the religion and it leaves her feeling on the outside.  Catholic would be fine and probably good, I think. She loved her time at camp at UVA, but has reservations about It because she thinks it will be quite liberal.

How do you dig into the atmosphere beyond visiting campuses?  One thing we’ve found somewhat helpful is reading the school newspaper.  We’ve also read school reviews by students online and feel like we can get a “flavor” for the school that way.  Is there anything else I’m missing in figuring out atmosphere?

Dd was invited to several interview weekends and picked up a lot about campus culture on those events.  She totally eliminated some colleges after those weekends.

Your comment about Catholic colleges caught my attention.  We are Catholic and dd thought Fordham was going to be way too liberal for her.  She applied b/c of its proximity and connections with the UN (she is interested in international fields), but the actual student body is incredibly liberal.  That is true about many Catholic Us (especially Jesuit ones).

Anyway, Dd researched political clubs, religious groups and activity on campus, read student newspapers, etc to glean images of the campus culture.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, 8FillTheHeart said:

Dd was invited to several interview weekends and picked up a lot about campus culture on those events.  She totally eliminated some colleges after those weekends.

Your comment about Catholic colleges caught my attention.  We are Catholic and dd thought Fordham was going to be way too liberal for her.  She applied b/c of its proximity and connections with the UN (she is interested in international fields), but the actual student body is incredibly liberal.  That is true about many Catholic Us (especially Jesuit ones).

Anyway, Dd researched political clubs, religious groups and activity on campus, read student newspapers, etc to glean images of the campus culture.

 

Thanks.  I guess we’ll just need to keep slogging through the information we can find.  Interesting about the Catholic colleges.  I was thinking those might be more in the center politically.  We are supposed to visit Villanova soon and we’ve been hopeful about it, but we will see.  Cost may also be an issue for us at Villanova.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Possibly Berea College?

It was founded in 1855 by abolitionists as the first interracial and co-ed college in the South. It has a Christian mission statement, with a goal of service towards others and stressing the kinship among all peoples. (Here is their mission statement.) It is super small (1600 students), and limited in degrees (Business and Nursing are among their degrees, but no pre-Med), but it is not too far away (Kentucky), and the tuition is FREE because it is work-college (every student works 10-15 hours/week while attending). I would guess that working together (shared experience towards a shared goal), creates community.

A Christian homeschooling family from our local support group has a DS attending Berea, and really enjoying it. I believe he graduates this year.

Edited by Lori D.
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Lori D. said:

Possibly Berea College?

It was founded in 1855 by abolitionists as the first interracial and co-ed college in the South. It has a Christian mission statement, with a goal of service towards others and stressing the kinship among all peoples. (Here is their mission statement.) It is super small (1600 students), and limited in degrees (Business and Nursing are among their degrees, but no pre-Med), but it is not too far away (Kentucky), and the tuition is FREE because it is work-college (every student works 10-15 hours/week while attending). I would guess that working together (shared experience towards a shared goal), creates community.

A Christian homeschooling family from our local support group has a DS attending Berea, and really enjoying it -- he is naturally an extrovert and makes friends easily wherever he goes, so that might be a factor to feeling comfortable in a small student body. I believe he graduates this year.

I will take a look at it.  Thank you!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe check out University of Rochester. Very engaged students, not super competitive though. Strong in business and pre-med. It is in Rochester, but it's a lovely, very defined campus and you do not feel like you're in a city at all. The campus is right on the Genesee River (my dd's room overlooks it--very pretty) There is a lot of green and outdoor space on campus. They are on College Xpress' conservative schools list.

Edited by whitestavern
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, whitestavern said:

Maybe check out University of Rochester. Very engaged students, not super competitive though. Strong in business and pre-med. It is in Rochester, but it's a lovely, very defined campus and you do not feel like you're in a city at all. The campus is right on the Genesee River (my dd's room overlooks it--very pretty) There is a lot of green and outdoor space on campus. They are on College Xpress' conservative schools list.

I will check it out.  For some reason, I was thinking the focus at this school was more toward tech/engineering-type students.  Thanks!

Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, whitestavern said:

Maybe check out University of Rochester. Very engaged students, not super competitive though. Strong in business and pre-med. It is in Rochester, but it's a lovely, very defined campus and you do not feel like you're in a city at all. The campus is right on the Genesee River (my dd's room overlooks it--very pretty) There is a lot of green and outdoor space on campus. They are on College Xpress' conservative schools list.

Yes, I’m thinking this would be one that she’d love minus the fact that they don’t offer an undergrad accounting degree.  But I could even see her working around that.  I just don’t know if we’d get enough aid to make it work. There is no way we can pay full freight for schools with this kind of tuition and we’ve got a weird financial situation that I don’t know whether schools will consider or not.  But, yes, she’d love it if she could go there.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

My daughter is at JMU. Have uou considered it? We really like it. I agree that you can find peers of like mind in a large school. To me, it is mid-sized, since I went to Ohio State! Nice setting, things to do, very dedicated students in business and music, anyway. Great food, nice culture, friendly to religion and conservatism but also broadening if she wants. Pm me if she would like to visit with dd. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Chris in VA said:

My daughter is at JMU. Have uou considered it? We really like it. I agree that you can find peers of like mind in a large school. To me, it is mid-sized, since I went to Ohio State! Nice setting, things to do, very dedicated students in business and music, anyway. Great food, nice culture, friendly to religion and conservatism but also broadening if she wants. Pm me if she would like to visit with dd. 

Chris, we haven’t really looked at JMU because she’s been pretty set on a smaller school.  Things have been so busy the last few days, I haven’t had a chance to share 8filltheheart’s comments with her about larger schools, but I plan to talk with her about that tomorrow.  My sister actually went to JMU many years ago.  Thanks so much for your sweet offer to have her visit with your dd.  If she becomes open to a larger school and wants to see JMU, I will definitely be in contact.  Thank you!😊

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Nicholas_mom said:

My niece is going to University of Scranton in Scranton, PA - 2 hrs north of Philadelphia.  It is a small university but its business school is good and my niece loves the school She is a pre-med student.  The business school has its own building.

 

Thank you, Nicholas_Mom!  I will take a look at it.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Mom0012 said:

Chris, we haven’t really looked at JMU because she’s been pretty set on a smaller school.  Things have been so busy the last few days, I haven’t had a chance to share 8filltheheart’s comments with her about larger schools, but I plan to talk with her about that tomorrow.  My sister actually went to JMU many years ago.  Thanks so much for your sweet offer to have her visit with your dd.  If she becomes open to a larger school and wants to see JMU, I will definitely be in contact.  Thank you!😊

The thing about a larger school that I always find interesting is how small a circle you draw, really--The only time you interact as a whole school/super large group is when you are at a sporting event, and even then it is just a portion of the people. Does she want a small, "whole group," or can she see that the "small school within a larger context" is a real possibility? My daughter sees mainly people in the School of Music (and will soon see more in the School of Education). She goes to a big school, but her professors all know her and care about her (a reason some want a small school), she knows a group of people very well and doesn't feel lost in a sea of people (another reason some want a small school), and she never feels like a number. Most of her classes are on the smaller side--but that does vary by major. However, as you get up in the ranks, so to speak, most classes are like in high school, about 15-30. 

So I guess I'm advocating for not writing off a larger uni, and asking what are you dd's personal reasons for finding a smaller uni attractive? Edited to take out giant emoji lol

 

Edited by Chris in VA
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Because you live in VA and can pay the EFC (or not!) you won't get much of any tuition help if you apply to schools in Virginia.  I learned this (and we didn't have $10,000 sitting around to pay the EFC) and others have shared similar experiences.  My oldest attends Liberty as a transfer student (we put our two oldest through NOVA because we could afford that without debt).  He is not ultra religious or very religious but has found a mostly welcoming environment (he is hearing impaired and that has presented some challenges that I don't believe the university has done a good job in assisting but I've learned that many colleges would have performed about just as well).  He believes that if he had started as a Freshman when they focus on helping the students form connections and groups in to which they enjoy the transition would have been even better.  He has a personality in which I thought he'd do better at a smaller setting but it has stretched him in many, many positive ways.  Now my dd is a different ball of wax.  She is at George Mason - smaller campus and there is a greater mix of commuter students.  That was not her first choice by any stretch of the imagination - she applied to all the bigger VA colleges and even with her 4.0 GPA and high test scores the cost of attendance was too high because of housing.  She is able to live at home.  Biggest issue there is their push for "Integrative Studies" degrees - check out the course listings and you'll see some issues!  She has stuck to her foundation and has done fine but we've had some really wonderful discussions and frustrations but thankfully she has had no issues.  Most interesting is that most students don't buy the agenda that is being pushed on them.  They just want to get the required degree to pursue their dreams.

Many moons ago I would have suggested checking out Marymount University - small, Catholic-based but I took both of my kids to visit and the atmosphere on campus is definitely changed since I attended!  For a student who is interested in business and some day working in DC, they do offer great assistance in an internship and forging those connections later on down the road. 

What about Mary Washington?  Christopher Newport?

You might be further ahead checking out colleges in North Carolina.  I found that location to home and ease of getting to and from was a factor for us - but each family is different.  If we had to pay transportation costs or even having a young driver on the road for hours, was definitely high on the decision list. 

Look at schools outside the state --

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

If JMU is too big, check out Eastern Mennonite (General conference Mennonite), in Harrisonburg, or Bridgewater College, in neighboring Bridgewater (Brethren).  The large anabaptist population in the area means that there is a conservative vibe, but that is is also a very social justice focused area, so there is kind of a conservative, yet hippy vibe. It’s not the same as around Liberty. While they aren’t state schools, they may well end up costing about the same for a student with decent stats. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, linders said:

Rhodes College? Tennessee.

Rhodes is not at all homeschool friendly, just FYI. Good school, but lots of hoops to jump. Christian Brothers might be worth checking out, too-although they’re best known for engineering. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Chris in VA said:

The thing about a larger school that I always find interesting is how small a circle you draw, really--The only time you interact as a whole school/super large group is when you are at a sporting event, and even then it is just a portion of the people. Does she want a small, "whole group," or can she see that the "small school within a larger context" is a real possibility? My daughter sees mainly people in the School of Music (and will soon see more in the School of Education). She goes to a big school, but her professors all know her and care about her (a reason some want a small school), she knows a group of people very well and doesn't feel lost in a sea of people (another reason some want a small school), and she never feels like a number. Most of her classes are on the smaller side--but that does vary by major. However, as you get up in the ranks, so to speak, most classes are like in high school, about 15-30. 

So I guess I'm advocating for not writing off a larger uni, and asking what are you dd's personal reasons for finding a smaller uni attractive? Edited to take out giant emoji lol

 

Honestly, I think she’s just looking for peers and wants to feel a part of a larger group.  She is an introvert, but craves deep connections. I definitely think that is possible at a larger college, and maybe even more possible than some smaller schools.  I did talk to her today some about this and I think she’s open to considering it, but we will see!

Edited by Mom0012
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, 1shortmomto4 said:

Because you live in VA and can pay the EFC (or not!) you won't get much of any tuition help if you apply to schools in Virginia.  I learned this (and we didn't have $10,000 sitting around to pay the EFC) and others have shared similar experiences.  My oldest attends Liberty as a transfer student (we put our two oldest through NOVA because we could afford that without debt).  He is not ultra religious or very religious but has found a mostly welcoming environment (he is hearing impaired and that has presented some challenges that I don't believe the university has done a good job in assisting but I've learned that many colleges would have performed about just as well).  He believes that if he had started as a Freshman when they focus on helping the students form connections and groups in to which they enjoy the transition would have been even better.  He has a personality in which I thought he'd do better at a smaller setting but it has stretched him in many, many positive ways.  Now my dd is a different ball of wax.  She is at George Mason - smaller campus and there is a greater mix of commuter students.  That was not her first choice by any stretch of the imagination - she applied to all the bigger VA colleges and even with her 4.0 GPA and high test scores the cost of attendance was too high because of housing.  She is able to live at home.  Biggest issue there is their push for "Integrative Studies" degrees - check out the course listings and you'll see some issues!  She has stuck to her foundation and has done fine but we've had some really wonderful discussions and frustrations but thankfully she has had no issues.  Most interesting is that most students don't buy the agenda that is being pushed on them.  They just want to get the required degree to pursue their dreams.

Many moons ago I would have suggested checking out Marymount University - small, Catholic-based but I took both of my kids to visit and the atmosphere on campus is definitely changed since I attended!  For a student who is interested in business and some day working in DC, they do offer great assistance in an internship and forging those connections later on down the road. 

What about Mary Washington?  Christopher Newport?

You might be further ahead checking out colleges in North Carolina.  I found that location to home and ease of getting to and from was a factor for us - but each family is different.  If we had to pay transportation costs or even having a young driver on the road for hours, was definitely high on the decision list. 

Look at schools outside the state --

Those are all the schools my son applied to, lol — George Mason, Mary Washington, Liberty and CNU.  He wound up at CNU and is happy, but, for him, Liberty would have also been a very good fit. I went to GMU myself many years ago. I’m glad to hear your dd is doing well there!  Thank you.

ETA: When we toured Mason, we definitely got the “agenda” vibe.  It has changed so much since I was there.  A good friend of my ds’s is there, though, and it is working out very well for him.  My niece will likely be there in a couple of years as well, transferring from NOVA.

Edited by Mom0012
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/21/2019 at 12:15 PM, Mom0012 said:

 

Thanks.  I guess we’ll just need to keep slogging through the information we can find.  Interesting about the Catholic colleges.  I was thinking those might be more in the center politically.  We are supposed to visit Villanova soon and we’ve been hopeful about it, but we will see.  Cost may also be an issue for us at Villanova.

 

Check out Templeton Honors College at Eastern University which is just down the road from Villanova.  It fits many of the preferences on your list.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Jennay said:

 

Check out Templeton Honors College at Eastern University which is just down the road from Villanova.  It fits many of the preferences on your list.

That does look interesting.  We will try to take a look.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/24/2019 at 8:32 PM, dmmetler said:

If JMU is too big, check out Eastern Mennonite (General conference Mennonite), in Harrisonburg, or Bridgewater College, in neighboring Bridgewater (Brethren).  The large anabaptist population in the area means that there is a conservative vibe, but that is is also a very social justice focused area, so there is kind of a conservative, yet hippy vibe. It’s not the same as around Liberty. While they aren’t state schools, they may well end up costing about the same for a student with decent stats. 

Agree. EM is right around the literal corner from JMU. We considered it, but dd needed a bigger orchestra. 

If you do go private, there is an automatic scholarship for Virginians who go to private school in VA. I think it's $3500 but don't quote me. Every little bit helps. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Villanova fits all of your criteria.  It is absolutely beautiful, pristine and the healthiest, best dining hall food out of all colleges we visited. It's very conservative and unabashedly so.  We loved our visit there.  Also there is a shuttle that goes to the stores every day, as well as the fact that the train stops at Villanova and is in center city Philadelphia in less than 20 minutes.  It's a great location!  

Another thought is Transylvania.  They are much more liberal but I read many reviews saying it's still a welcome place for conservatives.  Like, you wont get lit on fire or a brick thrown at your head like at Berkeley.  BUT, you won't necessarily have people clapping for you like at Villanova 🙂

Just some more ideas to throw out there.

Edited by Calming Tea
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/21/2019 at 10:37 AM, Mom0012 said:

 I will have to check it out again, but one of my concerns is that it is getting pretty dated.   

 

They have a website and a Facebook page. 

https://ctcl.org/

https://www.facebook.com/CTCLColleges/

On 2/21/2019 at 3:12 PM, whitestavern said:

Maybe check out University of Rochester. Very engaged students, not super competitive though.  

 

It's not a lottery school, but admittance hovers around 33% so pretty competitive (I know OP already checked it out further, posting for any lurkers). 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/24/2019 at 5:36 PM, Mom0012 said:

Honestly, I think she’s just looking for peers and wants to feel a part of a larger group.  She is an introvert, but craves deep connections. I definitely think that is possible at a larger college, and maybe even more possible than some smaller schools.  I did talk to her today some about this and I think she’s open to considering it, but we will see!

I'd keep looking at all the options.  Both my son and my thinking on larger schools has definitely evolved through his application process.  He applied to both small LAC's, midsize, and larger schools.  The largest schools are now prominent on the list where at the beginning of the process we were both definitely favoring LAC's.  I think larger schools are doing more to help students find their people.  In a smaller school, students are just very often more homogeneous.  

My kid got into URochester recently.  It's SO expensive.  They are not great with merit - and I think they had a reputation of being decent with merit for high stat kids in the not too distant past.  Just thought I'd throw that out there.  

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Re: Villanova

1. It's expensive and they don't meet full need, so even though you can pay your EFC, that may not help since you could get gapped, and need to pay more. 

2. It's gotten much harder to get into the past 2 years. For the HS class of 2018 the acceptance rate was 29%. Probably will be that or lower this year.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, FuzzyCatz said:

I'd keep looking at all the options.  Both my son and my thinking on larger schools has definitely evolved through his application process.  He applied to both small LAC's, midsize, and larger schools.  The largest schools are now prominent on the list where at the beginning of the process we were both definitely favoring LAC's.  I think larger schools are doing more to help students find their people.  In a smaller school, students are just very often more homogeneous.  

My kid got into URochester recently.  It's SO expensive.  They are not great with merit - and I think they had a reputation of being decent with merit for high stat kids in the not too distant past.  Just thought I'd throw that out there.  

 

2 hours ago, mom1720 said:

Re: Villanova

1. It's expensive and they don't meet full need, so even though you can pay your EFC, that may not help since you could get gapped, and need to pay more. 

2. It's gotten much harder to get into the past 2 years. For the HS class of 2018 the acceptance rate was 29%. Probably will be that or lower this year.

Yes, most of the schools she is interested in have about a 30% acceptance rate or less.  While private schools are not out of the realm of possibility, I also realize we may be priced out of them.  That’s why I am trying to cast a wide net and have a number of options that she would be happy with as well as some financial safeties,  The hardest combination to come up with so far is financial safeties that she will also be excited about.🙂. But, I do understand the situation.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, katilac said:

 

They have a website and a Facebook page. 

https://ctcl.org/

https://www.facebook.com/CTCLColleges/

 

It's not a lottery school, but admittance hovers around 33% so pretty competitive (I know OP already checked it out further, posting for any lurkers). 

I took the competitive comment to mean it’s not a cut-throat atmosphere among the students that are attending, rather than meaning it’s not competitive to get into the school.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/21/2019 at 5:10 AM, Mom0012 said:

My dd and I are trying to finalize a list of schools for her to apply to.  Please help if you have any suggestions!

Most important is she’d like to be with very dedicated, engaged students, but does not want a high pressure, cut-throat atmosphere.

She’s interested in business and pre-med

Other preferences -

- smaller school with a tight knit community 

- not right in the middle of a big city

- campus where conservatives are welcome

- cooler climate (not Georgia! at least)

Her SAT score is high and we can pay our EFC.  We are in Virginia and she’d like to be somewhere on this side of the country.

Miami University in Ohio.

Tiers of score based merit aid. Strong students can get tuition down to in state rates or lower.

Fairly conservative state. Big enough that I think most kids could find their people there.

Warm in the summer but not flesh-melting. 4 seasons and cold but bearable winters.  

 

Edited by Sebastian (a lady)
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...