Jump to content

Menu

Has anyone used this lit analysis program?


Recommended Posts

...and can tell me how it stacks up with other lit programs (which I am currently researching)?  This would be for 9th grade.  They also have British lit and some other programs.  

https://7sistershomeschool.com/products-page/high-school-american-literature-study-guides/american-literature/

We would be doing a separate writing curriculum.

I am also looking at IEW's Windows to the World.  Any thoughts on that for 9th?  I know that is a semester curriculum.

From K through 8th, I have over planned and tried to cram so much in.  It worked fine for us (we survived), but looking back, I think it would have been better if I had streamlined things and dug deeper.  That is what I'm striving for in high school.

ETA:  I am also really looking at Literary Lessons from Lord of the Rings with added lit analysis in there.  My boys loved The Hobbit and we've waited to delve into the Lord of the Rings and watch the movies.  

Edited by mlktwins
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, mlktwins said:

...I am also really looking at Literary Lessons from Lord of the Rings with added lit analysis in there.  My boys loved The Hobbit and we've waited to delve into the Lord of the Rings and watch the movies.  


If wanting to do LLftLotR, now would be the time to do it, as it is a very gentle intro/beginning program for Literature, and would likely be too "light" if you wait past 9th grade to do it. Also, JMO, but if a student is excited to do some specific literature (in this case, LotR), run with it! You definitely get tons more out of any study when the student is excited and interested about the specific subject! 😍

I think if you study a few more works discussed in LLftLotR (The Iliad or The Odyssey; Beowulf; Sir Gawain and the Green Knight; Midsummer Night's Dream or Macbeth), I think you'd have a very solid Lit. line up for your 9th grade English credit. And do check out this past thread for more ideas of expanding your study of Tolkien and LotR: "Any serious Tolkien fans..."
 

...I am also looking at IEW's Windows to the World.  Any thoughts on that for 9th?  I know that is a semester curriculum...
... We would be doing a separate writing curriculum.


We did WttW, as a unit or two at a time, spread out over 2 years in high school, so that's an option, too -- perhaps do some or all of WttW along with LLftLotR. During the weeks you are learning about how to write a literary analysis essay in WttW, or are using writing assignments from that program, I'd suggest setting aside the separate writing curriculum.

I really like WttW -- best step by step instruction in how to write a literary analysis essay that I've seen. The program starts off by teaching annotation, then teaches how to write a literary analysis essay, using your annotations as your support, and then the last half of the program goes over the 8-10 most common literary devices and how they work in literature. There are helpful exercises throughout to practice the information, as well as some longer writing assignments. The program focuses on 6 short stories (included in the curriculum). Of the stories, our DSs really enjoyed 3 of the stories (Gift of the Magi, The Most Dangerous Game, and The Open Window. DSs thought 2 of the stories were just okay (Fight With a Cannon, and, The Necklace). They though 1 short story (A Jury of Her Peers) was very tough as it is very subtle.
 

...[Has anyone used this lit. analysis program]...and can tell me how it stacks up with other lit programs (which I am currently researching)?  ...  https://7sistershomeschool.com/products-page/high-school-american-literature-study-guides/american-literature/


No familiarity with any of the 7 Sisters programs. The sample of the Amer. Lit. guide looks like it would be a fine choice. Just adding a general observation: a LOT of classic American Lit. tends to be on the "dark" and "heavy" side, which can be tough for a young high school student to connect with. I would guess that's one reason why a lot of schools wait until along about 11th grade to do American Lit. -- that, and the fact that that's also the grade they're doing American History, and those are good subjects to match up. As with matching up American History and Government credits in the same year -- you get a lot of resonance back and forth in your studies.
 

...From K through 8th, I have over planned and tried to cram so much in.  It worked fine for us (we survived), but looking back, I think it would have been better if I had streamlined things and dug deeper.  That is what I'm striving for in high school...


Sounds like a good plan! It is hard, as there are so many "competing good" programs to choose from. BEST of luck! Warmly, Lori D.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

I love, love, love WttW with Jill Pike's syllabus and teach it every couple of years to groups of homeschool students. I highly recommend it for students who are new to writing literary analysis essays, and I have my own dc take it in either 8th or 9th grade. The syllabus adds "Teaching the Classics," 2 novels (To Kill a Mockingbird and Jane Eyre), and one play (Hamlet), but I have substituted various novels over the years depending on the needs of the students. With those additions, the class takes an entire school year.

Link to post
Share on other sites

We were super excited about The Lord of the Rings Study because we are all big fans  but have never finished because we found it boring. I just want you to know  it is mostly fill in the blank facts for each chapter. Then there are lots and lots of vocab words, pages of vocab words. It does cover some literary terms in the additional notes sections which was good.

 

I'm thinking of trying again with the 11 year old and doing just the Unit Studies which so far we have found very interesting. The 13 Unit studies look good but we have only finished 2: one on the authors background and one on linguistics. I just need to give up doing all the in between stuff that feels like busy work. Perhaps the Unit Studies alone may be worth the price.

 

Edited by frogger
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, frogger said:

We were super excited about The Lord of the Rings Study because we are all big fans  but have never finished because we found it boring. I just want you to know  it is mostly fill in the blank facts for each chapter. Then there are lots and lots of vocab words, pages of vocab words. It does cover some literary terms in the additional notes sections which was good.

I'm thinking of trying again with the 11 year old and doing just the Unit Studies which so far we have found very interesting. The 13 Unit studies look good but we have only finished 2: one on the authors background and one on linguistics. I just need to give up doing all the in between stuff that feels like busy work. Perhaps the Unit Studies alone may be worth the price.


Yes, when we did LLftLotR, we skipped the fill-in-the-blank comprehension and vocabulary, read the chapter notes and discussion questions at the end of the chapter notes, and enjoyed the unit studies. Worked very well! (:D

If you can find a used *original* edition teacher guide of the program, that's all you need, as it reproduces all of the student pages with answers. The newer edition (came out around 2010??) split out the material differently, requiring the purchase of both student and teacher editions.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...