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gardenmom5

kids of antivaxxers grow up

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7 minutes ago, maize said:

Smallpox has been eradicated worldwide.

Any number of government or other entities could have stored samples though, raising the spector of smallpox use as a biological warfare agent. That is why military vaccinations are done.

Did they officially eradicate it?  Because I could have sworn I just saw a story about infections somewhere in South America.  Maybe it was an old article?

 

ETA - ah nope, it was lab based and not an infected individual, but a discussion of bioweapon potential.  Makes more sense.

Edited by Arctic Mama
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Smallpox is officially eradicated, but there have been concerns about it making a return from corpses in Siberia (perhaps other places too, but this happened with anthrax apparently in Siberia, so is of concern) that could have preserved smallpox — in addition to terrorism possibilities. 

 

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2 hours ago, Pen said:

@maize Thanks!  What about Queen Elizabeth dying of Quinsy ?  Can you turn your excellent explanatory skills to that?  I had heard she died of probable heavy metal poisoning.  Maybe lead or arsenic from face whitening creams?

It seems curious that Parker had a mum who was so against vaccinations — and yet that she was treated with so much antibiotic as to develop antibiotic resistant tonsil  infection.

 

Seems the cause of Elizabeth's death was never ascertained so remains a source of speculation. She did have signs of infection, maybe the "almonds" in her throat refers to swollen lymph nodes?

"Elizabeth had caught cold in early January which had turned to bronchitis.  On January 21 the Court moved to Richmond. The records we have from this time period are pretty extensive from contemporaries’ writings.  William Camden was given the Queen’s Rolls, Memorials and Records by William Cecil to use in compiling an historical account of the reign of Queen Elizabeth.  He wanted to do her justice, he wanted to obey Cecil and he wanted to tell the truth as he attested on the third page of ‘The Author to the Reader’ note.  A noble ambition and one that is hard to argue against.  We have from him that in the beginning of Elizabeth’s illness the “Almonds in her Throat swelled, and soon abated again; then her Appetite failed by degrees; and withal she gave herself over wholly to Melancholy, and seemed to be much troubled with a peculiar Grief for some Reason or other” (Camden 659)."

https://elizregina.com/tag/quinsy/

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1 hour ago, AbcdeDooDah said:

Not sure where I said anything of the sort. If an adult has not been titred and boostered they should not be blaming only unvaccinated kids for the diseases reemerging.

 I was vaxxed.  My kids are vaxxed. It is possible to see more than one side of an argument. 

 

I think the difference is that most adults who don't get boosters aren't deliberatly making a decision not to be protected - they may be lazy but often they don't even think about needing them.

That's a really different issue than making a decision to not do it, and probably a lot easier to solve.

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9 minutes ago, Bluegoat said:

 

I think the difference is that most adults who don't get boosters aren't deliberatly making a decision not to be protected - they may be lazy but often they don't even think about needing them.

That's a really different issue than making a decision to not do it, and probably a lot easier to solve.

 Awareness needs to include adults then, yes?

I'm not so sure about not being deliberate when I've heard excuses like, "My insurance won't pay for them." They're not willing to put their money where their mouth is. 

 

Edited by AbcdeDooDah
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This has always been a "damned if you do / damned if you don't" thing to me. I was vaccinated for everything under the sun as was available back then. I had a raging case of measles when I was six that I can actually vividly remember. I should be immune to measles.

My son had selective vaccinations including measles but since these outbreaks in various parts of the country, I have been wondering if his shots are still enough protection and if he is actually immune like I am. Dh just said he cannot remember having had measles but remembers having had chicken pox.

Glad I don't have to make decisions for other people anymore. He can decide all this for himself now and I decide for myself.

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36 minutes ago, AbcdeDooDah said:

 Awareness needs to include adults then, yes?

I'm not so sure about not being deliberate when I've heard excuses like, "My insurance won't pay for them." They're not willing to put their money where their mouth is. 

 

 

Yes, there are a number of things that can be done pretty easily to get adults vaccinated.  Checking on status at certain check-ups, for example.  Covering the cost would also be a significant one.

But I am not sure how that is not completely different than someone purposefully refusing to be vaccinated because they think it is a bad idea.

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My doctors have reevaluated my vaccination status as an adult. Some (like chicken pox) were not needed because I had it as a child. Some, like small pox, I had the vaccine but it isn’t needed anymore. And some have been updated. 

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3 hours ago, DesertBlossom said:

This blows my mind. If it were me, and my health, and I required therapy to recover and regain skills lost from every vaccine I received, I would stop vaccinating. Your child is obviously more susceptible to vaccine injury than most and is the definition of someone who shouldn't be vaccinated.

It is the exact same response he gets after getting sick with a bad head cold or any other virus. I can only imagine what getting an active virus like measles or chickenpox would do to him then. He is lovely and splendid once the inflammation goes away and with each progressive year, his recovery is shorter, lighter and less extreme. I actually think the vaccine inflammation in small doses has allowed his body to become better capable of responding effectively to the inflammation over time. He went from non verbal, no eye contact and with a diagnosis of what they believed would be significant effects of autism to being a highly verbal, highly intelligent and somewhat quirky little 8 year old. His doctors have all been floored by him and knowing what I know about brain inflammation (I previously worked in research and DH still is a neurobiologist) we both believe our choice was a good one. 

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28 minutes ago, Bluegoat said:

 

Yes, there are a number of things that can be done pretty easily to get adults vaccinated.  Checking on status at certain check-ups, for example.  Covering the cost would also be a significant one.

But I am not sure how that is not completely different than someone purposefully refusing to be vaccinated because they think it is a bad idea.

I'm not sure that it really matters if they are both capable of spreading the same disease. 

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Hopefully I don’t get chased off the board for this.... but I received all my vaccines at age 18 when I left for college.   I had one dose of polio vaccine as a child when they had a polio scare, but that’s it.  Mostly a mix of money, timing and government conspiracy theories, I suspect.  

I don’t recommend it as a Fun Time, but better late than never in my case.

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10 minutes ago, AK_Mom4 said:

Hopefully I don’t get chased off the board for this.... but I received all my vaccines at age 18 when I left for college.   I had one dose of polio vaccine as a child when they had a polio scare, but that’s it.  Mostly a mix of money, timing and government conspiracy theories, I suspect.  

I don’t recommend it as a Fun Time, but better late than never in my case.

Aw, it's fine. 

My oldest was irritated at me for being anti-vax-ish. My kids all have the bare minimum for school entry. She is getting a degree in education so she will get all the required shots. My 4th was not vaxxed until after age three. We both got whooping cough. She has only the bare minimum. She's 16 now. The doctor always tried to convince me to get her the meningitis, but I have yet to be convinced when her argument is, "It's a real thing."

Edited by AbcdeDooDah
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48 minutes ago, AbcdeDooDah said:

I have yet to be convinced when her argument is, "It's a real thing."

Well, your doctor is not eloquent, but she's right.  In the last 9 years four college students in my city have died from bacterial meningitis.  They thought they just had a cold or flu, went to bed, went into comas, and died.  

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28 minutes ago, klmama said:

Well, your doctor is not eloquent, but she's right.  In the last 9 years four college students in my city have died from bacterial meningitis.  They thought they just had a cold or flu, went to bed, went into comas, and died.  

I get that, but I was also refusing the heps and she pushed for the meningitis with that line.

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1 hour ago, AK_Mom4 said:

Hopefully I don’t get chased off the board for this.... but I received all my vaccines at age 18 when I left for college.   I had one dose of polio vaccine as a child when they had a polio scare, but that’s it.  Mostly a mix of money, timing and government conspiracy theories, I suspect.  

I don’t recommend it as a Fun Time, but better late than never in my case.

 

Were you terribly ill during your childhood with one thing after another like Amy Parker reported about herself? 

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24 minutes ago, Pen said:

 

Were you terribly ill during your childhood with one thing after another like Amy Parker reported about herself? 

Nope.  Just grew up in a time and place that was Rural, Poor and Suspicious of Government.  All of us kids were ridiculously healthy growing up, but we did tend to run a bit wild.

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6 hours ago, LMD said:

 

Yeah, there is definitely a mindset that these diseases are not that bad and we can cure them with vitamin c so why should we quarantine ourselves? They really think coming to a homeschool group meeting with whooping cough is appropriate. 😡

In certain circles, I got a lot of shocked side eyes for admitting to giving my dd the gardasil vaccine. 

 

I have run into this too in homeschooling circles.  The anti-vaxx families I know 100% believe that measles, whooping cough, polio, etc are no worse than the flu. 

When the ebola scare was all over the news a few years ago, I had someone tell me "I am not worried about ebola because I eat organic and my body handles toxins better than non-organic eaters".  No. That's not how that works. 

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11 hours ago, Quill said:

In the late 90s, early 00s, a lot of antis did seem to think this way IME. They looked to the info in that stupid Shot in the Dark book and believed that diseases like Diphtheria were “going away on their own” due to improved sanitation and better treatment and nutrition, and did not, in fact, drastically drop in incidence due to vaccines. Thus, they believed that with superior nutrition their kids would not contract measels, say, even if there were a local outbreak. 

Some also thought the diseases were “no big deal,” either because they believed their super-healthy, sugar-free, crunchy kids would effectively fight the virus and thus, symptoms would be minor, or because possibly in some instances, they did not understand how devastating things like pertussis can actually be. 

The anti vaxxers I know don’t think the kids won’t get the illness they just think it won’t be severe due to good healthy immune systems.

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Well thanks to the podcast mentioned up thread, I just realized that my vaccine scar is from the smallpox vaccine! Which I think is pretty cool.

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1 hour ago, Ausmumof3 said:

The anti vaxxers I know don’t think the kids won’t get the illness they just think it won’t be severe due to good healthy immune systems.

Yep, and their vit c, turmeric and homeopathy will cure it anyway... 

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8 hours ago, Quill said:

True, but isn’t that why the vaccine companies (Merck, I think) removed Thimerasol (probably spelling that wrong) from MMR? So many activists were saying it was mercury that caused their child’s autism, so Merck removed mercury. 

 

Some Aussie anti-vaxers use mercury as a reason not to vax their kids, even though we've never had mercury in our vaccines.

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2 hours ago, Rosie_0801 said:

 

Some Aussie anti-vaxers use mercury as a reason not to vax their kids, even though we've never had mercury in our vaccines.

Boy...it would be hard for me to hear that one if I lived there! 

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3 hours ago, Rosie_0801 said:

 

Some Aussie anti-vaxers use mercury as a reason not to vax their kids, even though we've never had mercury in our vaccines.

 Yep, we have those too in the Netherlands. Makes me want to scream!

Threads like this always make me a bit nervous. We don't vaccinate against chicken pox here, and somehow all my kids haven't had it yet....which makes me worried about my eldest especially. And noone, really noone, is getting their tithers checked and vaccines updated as an adult. My family doctor would think I am crazy if I suggest such a thing. But I agree it would be a really smart idea with my general weak health. Hmmm, what to do....

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I have to say I feel like the elephant in the room with this discussion is that the risk from unvaxxed kids is probably not much greater than the risk from adults with waning immunity.  If herd immunity is the thing pushing/funding adults to get boosters seems like it would be as valuable as tackling the strong antivaxers?

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10 hours ago, AbcdeDooDah said:

I'm not sure that it really matters if they are both capable of spreading the same disease. 

 

If you are going to suggest that it's the same kind of problem, it matters.  It's not - a different cause, a different solution. It's not all that difficult to put programs in place to make sure adults, who otherwise understand that vaccination is important, also understand that adults need to keep up their vaccinations.  Clearly it is not easy to convince people who think vaccination is a threat to vaccinate their kids.

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14 hours ago, Quill said:

Boy. That sux. Although clearly the disease would suck worse, but still...hats off to military personnel. One more awful thing that’s just part of the job. 

 

Everyone gets the smallpox vax in bootcamp here. They couldn't care less where you're going lol. 

ETA-- Well, file under "the internet doesn't know everything," I went looking for a relevant link to add and everything I found said both that they'll check your titers (they don't) and that only people in special circumstances get the smallpox vaccine. But every single recruit gets one. Weird.

ETA Again. I just found and read the relevant Commandant's memo. I wonder where the people who wrote articles about it got their incorrect information, since it's right there. This is why we're all getting dumber.

Edited by OKBud
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54 minutes ago, Ausmumof3 said:

I have to say I feel like the elephant in the room with this discussion is that the risk from unvaxxed kids is probably not much greater than the risk from adults with waning immunity.  If herd immunity is the thing pushing/funding adults to get boosters seems like it would be as valuable as tackling the strong antivaxers?

A PA in the ER told me a couple of weeks ago that I had whooping cough. She misread the antibody result that she believed showed I had an active infection. According to my pulmonologist, she read the wrong lab result for that diagnosis. The PA tried to look at my immunization schedule (it was a military ER and should have had all my med records), but it had disappeared. They have no knowledge of any vaccinations, including childhood vacs. Any vaccinations I've had as an adult would have been in that record. So now I have to find my records theoretically dating back 20 years or have my titers checked. It will probably be easier to have my titers checked.

To the best of my knowledge, no doctor I've had, both military and civilian, has ever suggested updating my vaccinations. Until this thread and my whooping cough incident, I didn't know it was something I needed to be aware of. I would think this would be something doctors would recommend during physicals, but that hasn't been my experience.

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1 hour ago, wilrunner said:

A PA in the ER told me a couple of weeks ago that I had whooping cough. She misread the antibody result that she believed showed I had an active infection. According to my pulmonologist, she read the wrong lab result for that diagnosis. The PA tried to look at my immunization schedule (it was a military ER and should have had all my med records), but it had disappeared. They have no knowledge of any vaccinations, including childhood vacs. Any vaccinations I've had as an adult would have been in that record. So now I have to find my records theoretically dating back 20 years or have my titers checked. It will probably be easier to have my titers checked.

To the best of my knowledge, no doctor I've had, both military and civilian, has ever suggested updating my vaccinations. Until this thread and my whooping cough incident, I didn't know it was something I needed to be aware of. I would think this would be something doctors would recommend during physicals, but that hasn't been my experience.

Exactly. When I got married 25 years ago, blood tests were required. I was told my MMR was no longer valid so I got a booster. At age 20. Then I got whooping cough in my thirties. It doesn't compute that it its only unvaccinated children spreading disease.

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1 hour ago, wilrunner said:

A PA in the ER told me a couple of weeks ago that I had whooping cough. She misread the antibody result that she believed showed I had an active infection. According to my pulmonologist, she read the wrong lab result for that diagnosis.

 

The Pertussis whooping cough vaccine in use for the past 20+ years has been failing .  Also there are a lot of bad reactions to it.  Whooping cough went through out area including in kids who had had their baby vaccinations and had had their adolescent booster.  People were assuming at first that whooping cough was impossible because their kids were vaccinated.

It’s bad for convincing people that far more critical vaccinations do work and with fewer bad reactions.

 

 

1 hour ago, wilrunner said:

To the best of my knowledge, no doctor I've had, both military and civilian, has ever suggested updating my vaccinations. Until this thread and my whooping cough incident, I didn't know it was something I needed to be aware of. I would think this would be something doctors would recommend during physicals, but that hasn't been my experience.

 

 I haven’t had anything other than flu and tetanus vaccination ever suggested to me as an adult.  

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I think dogmatic people are dogmatic.  I have seen a lot of people unable to accept the significance of the 18th birthday.

I also agree that "it's a miracle I'm alive" is a bit insane.  But considering how the person was raised, if he's irrational, that shouldn't be a surprise.

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39 minutes ago, AbcdeDooDah said:

Exactly. When I got married 25 years ago, blood tests were required. I was told my MMR was no longer valid so I got a booster. At age 20. Then I got whooping cough in my thirties. It doesn't compute that it its only unvaccinated children spreading disease.

I don’t know as far as doctors suggesting it, but I requested a Pertussis booster several years ago. I had a very severe cough and went in for fear it could be whooping cough. Doctor said no, it is not, but if you want to boost DTaP, we can do it today. So I did. 

But I do think that part of why children are the focus of attention for vaccinations moreso than adults who might need boosters is because children are in a much more regulatable situation. They are the ones attending school, college, summer camps, daycares, etc., so it is relatively easy to gain compliance, compared with rounding up the adults who might need a booster. 

Personally, the cynic in me believes that if it were possible to give all vaccines to babies in the hospital at birth, that’s what they would do. 

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24 minutes ago, SKL said:

I think dogmatic people are dogmatic.  I have seen a lot of people unable to accept the significance of the 18th birthday.

I also agree that "it's a miracle I'm alive" is a bit insane.  But considering how the person was raised, if he's irrational, that shouldn't be a surprise.

 

I was thinking that for both the stories that were shared it appears that there’s some very black/white dogmatic thinking by both the parent(s) and child(ren).  

 

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46 minutes ago, SKL said:

I also agree that "it's a miracle I'm alive" is a bit insane.

Social media has given him a platform.  Maybe he's just being dramatic.

I'm so grateful we didn't have social media when I was a teen!  A public setting in which to say all manner of unkind things about my parents?  The added possibility of fifteen minutes of fame?   :sad:

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4 hours ago, Ausmumof3 said:

I have to say I feel like the elephant in the room with this discussion is that the risk from unvaxxed kids is probably not much greater than the risk from adults with waning immunity.  If herd immunity is the thing pushing/funding adults to get boosters seems like it would be as valuable as tackling the strong antivaxers?

But there is a campaign to get adults to get boosters- at least the pertussis one. 

https://www.ispot.tv/ad/7ctF/glaxosmithkline-whooping-cough-vaccination

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4 hours ago, Ausmumof3 said:

I have to say I feel like the elephant in the room with this discussion is that the risk from unvaxxed kids is probably not much greater than the risk from adults with waning immunity.  If herd immunity is the thing pushing/funding adults to get boosters seems like it would be as valuable as tackling the strong antivaxers?

My DD's pediatrician had DH and I get a whooping cough booster, but also had DD on a delayed vaccination schedule due to the fact that DD was a preemie, and she wanted to wait to vaccinate, as much as possible, based on adjusted age, not chronological. I also have gotten measles and rubella boosters when a child in my school was DX'd with it-the health department came in and offered it to all teachers/staff.

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5 hours ago, Tress said:

We don't vaccinate against chicken pox here, and somehow all my kids haven't had it yet....which makes me worried about my eldest especially. And noone, really noone, is getting their tithers checked and vaccines updated as an adult. My family doctor would think I am crazy if I suggest such a thing. But I agree it would be a really smart idea with my general weak health. Hmmm, what to do....

 

I had chickenpox when I was doing postgraduate as a 27 years old. Two of my classmates had chickenpox at the same time. Our recovery was relatively mild. 

My 11th grade math teacher had chickenpox and had to be hospitalized. It is usually worse the older the person is. 

I have my tithers checked recently as part of routine checkup. I don’t have immunity for rubella and that was similar for both my pregnancies so I wasn’t surprised. My health has never been great so it wasn’t unusual to check for whether I need booster shots.

Edited by Arcadia

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My measles vaccination status was checked when I was pregnant.  I'm pretty sure that is a normal thing that they do.

Baby boomers are being screened for hepatitis C especially and vaccinated if necessary.

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The anti-vaxx families I know 100% believe that measles, whooping cough, polio, etc are no worse than the flu. 

 

Have they ever HAD the flu!? Most miserable two weeks of my life, and I was fully wiped out for the next month thereafter.

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Every time I've been preggo I've been encouraged to get a pertussis booster. And my OB has explained why it's a good idea to do so. Are no other doctors mentioning this at physicals and such? Almost every drugstore I go in has signs about updating shots or getting a flu shot or shingles or pertussis. But then I feel like those that are anti-vax say those campaigns are just a way for big Pharma to make more $$$. So either they aren't doing enough to address the problem of adult vaccinations, but what they do on any front (for babies/kids/adults) is considered (by those who don't want to vax anyway) as propaganda or fear-mongering to make them money. 

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I read that the flu has been especially deadly for young people the last couple of years. I think as a society we adjust to the risks we have because we have to. But when those risks are no longer necessary, we rebel against them. Which is why I had the chicken pox as a kid but didn't think it was a big deal. But I'd never have skipped the vax for my kids. People die of chicken pox. I think that shift is starting to happen more with the flu - though obviously the flu shot is less effective and has to be given more often to keep up to date with strains.

I definitely had the HPV vax for my boys. Both my father and step-father died of HPV related cancers that now my boys can't get. That's an amazing thing. Thanks, science.

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2 hours ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

My measles vaccination status was checked when I was pregnant.  I'm pretty sure that is a normal thing that they do.

Baby boomers are being screened for hepatitis C especially and vaccinated if necessary.

I thought it was just rubella immunity that is routinely tested for early in a pregnancy? 

I have been intending to get a measles titer next time I'm at the doctor, but I should check my records in case it was done during my last pregnancy.  (Though that was long enough ago that perhaps I should be testing anyway!)

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4 minutes ago, Eliana said:

I thought it was just rubella immunity that is routinely tested for early in a pregnancy? 

I have been intending to get a measles titer next time I'm at the doctor, but I should check my records in case it was done during my last pregnancy.  (Though that was long enough ago that perhaps I should be testing anyway!)

I think that they asked about all three. But it’s been awhile since I’ve been pregnant...

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2 hours ago, EmseB said:

Every time I've been preggo I've been encouraged to get a pertussis booster. And my OB has explained why it's a good idea to do so. Are no other doctors mentioning this at physicals and such? Almost every drugstore I go in has signs about updating shots or getting a flu shot or shingles or pertussis. But then I feel like those that are anti-vax say those campaigns are just a way for big Pharma to make more $$$. So either they aren't doing enough to address the problem of adult vaccinations, but what they do on any front (for babies/kids/adults) is considered (by those who don't want to vax anyway) as propaganda or fear-mongering to make them money. 

Pertussis boosters started being recommended for pregnant women a few years ago; I've had them for my last two pregnancies but no one mentioned it for my earlier pregnancies.

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Every hospital and healthcare facility I've worked for does titers, at least for all employees involved in patient contact.  They also do free vaccines for employees. Apparently I lose DTAP much faster than most people, at about 4 years.

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7 hours ago, Ausmumof3 said:

I have to say I feel like the elephant in the room with this discussion is that the risk from unvaxxed kids is probably not much greater than the risk from adults with waning immunity.  If herd immunity is the thing pushing/funding adults to get boosters seems like it would be as valuable as tackling the strong antivaxers?

 

This really varies from vaccine to vaccine. Here in the US there are campaigns encouraging adults to get pertussis boosters because we know that immunity wanes within a few years. Measles is very different, the current CDC recommendation is that adults who had two measles vaccine doses as children (most people born after 1967 in the US) can be considered to have lifelong immunity; adults who had only one dose (many born between 1957 and 1967) should have titers checked. People born before 1957 are generally assumed to have had the disease.

It isn't one size fits all, there isn't evidence of mass waning of immunity to measles. Here's one study that found measles antibody status of mothers who were vaccinated as children, while somewhat lower than that of mothers who had had measles as children, was nevertheless sufficient to pass measles antibodies on to their infants:

https://www.jpeds.com/article/S0022-3476(86)81039-3/fulltext

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6 hours ago, AbcdeDooDah said:

Exactly. When I got married 25 years ago, blood tests were required. I was told my MMR was no longer valid so I got a booster. At age 20. Then I got whooping cough in my thirties. It doesn't compute that it its only unvaccinated children spreading disease.

I think there is some resistance in adults who were vaccinated. I don't think the vaccination works one day and not the next, but it's more that it becomes less effective. It was the titers the PA misread, so clearly I have either had whooping cough in the past or my vaccination is still strong.

 

6 hours ago, Pen said:

 

The Pertussis whooping cough vaccine in use for the past 20+ years has been failing .  Also there are a lot of bad reactions to it.  Whooping cough went through out area including in kids who had had their baby vaccinations and had had their adolescent booster.  People were assuming at first that whooping cough was impossible because their kids were vaccinated.

It’s bad for convincing people that far more critical vaccinations do work and with fewer bad reactions.

 

 

 

 I haven’t had anything other than flu and tetanus vaccination ever suggested to me as an adult.  

Right. And if vaccinations are becoming less effective, one would think the information would come from the doctors to ensure everyone is still protected.

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4 hours ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

But there is a campaign to get adults to get boosters- at least the pertussis one. 

https://www.ispot.tv/ad/7ctF/glaxosmithkline-whooping-cough-vaccination

The cynic in me says Glaxosmithkline isn't necessarily doing this for public health. The little cough the grandmother had sounds nothing like someone who's infected with whooping cough.

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46 minutes ago, wilrunner said:

The cynic in me says Glaxosmithkline isn't necessarily doing this for public health. The little cough the grandmother had sounds nothing like someone who's infected with whooping cough.

Well of course they have a financial interest. But I think that it also serves as a public service announcement. 

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1 hour ago, maize said:

 

This really varies from vaccine to vaccine. Here in the US there are campaigns encouraging adults to get pertussis boosters because we know that immunity wanes within a few years. Measles is very different, the current CDC recommendation is that adults who had two measles vaccine doses as children (most people born after 1967 in the US) can be considered to have lifelong immunity; adults who had only one dose (many born between 1957 and 1967) should have titers checked. People born before 1957 are generally assumed to have had the disease.

It isn't one size fits all, there isn't evidence of mass waning of immunity to measles. Here's one study that found measles antibody status of mothers who were vaccinated as children, while somewhat lower than that of mothers who had had measles as children, was nevertheless sufficient to pass measles antibodies on to their infants:

https://www.jpeds.com/article/S0022-3476(86)81039-3/fulltext

Oh that makes sense.  I though waning immunity affected everyone for the MMR.  I didn’t realise it was only those who had a single shot vaccine.

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