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Hello Hive,

Could one of you lovely people please help me to understand why the following sentence is diagrammed as it is in the student answer key.

It's the first sentence in Exercise 68C.

The King of Persia planned to destroy both him and his tribe.

Here is how we classified the sentence. 

King of Persia: Subject Noun

the: article adjective (diagrammed under SN)

planned: verb (diagrammed after SN)

to destroy: direct object (infinitive, diagrammed on the little stalks in the DO spot)

here is where I get lost. "both him and his tribe" are diagrammed after "to destroy" in the direct object spot. Is it a direct object in a direct object?!? Please help, I am so confused...

 

Thanks

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In the main clause, the direct object of “planned” is the complete infinitive phrase “to destroy both him and his tribe.” 

Within the infinitive phrase, the object of “to destroy” is “both him and his tribe.”

I like to think of the complete verbal phrase acting as a single part of speech, but within the phrase there are different parts. 

I don’t have access to the book, but I imagine that the infinitive phrase would be on its own little stand.

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18 hours ago, Kuovonne said:

In the main clause, the direct object of “planned” is the complete infinitive phrase “to destroy both him and his tribe.” 

Within the infinitive phrase, the object of “to destroy” is “both him and his tribe.”

I like to think of the complete verbal phrase acting as a single part of speech, but within the phrase there are different parts. 

I don’t have access to the book, but I imagine that the infinitive phrase would be on its own little stand.

Thank you for replying. I really appreciate your time!

I hated grammar at school and I hate it now! I am so frustrated and I am struggling to understand all this. My son and I usually end the lesson confused, scratching our heads and me in tears because I just don't get it... I still don't understand how this sentence is classified and we haven't even finished diagramming the other sentences... sob

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This explanation may or may not help, so if you read it and find it confusing, just delete it. 

The 3 English verbals (participles, infinitives, and gerunds . . . yes, that spells PIG, and yes, I have a poster, haha) are all words that USED TO BE verbs, but are now functioning as either adjectives, adverbs, or nouns. So back in their former life as verbs, some of them had objects ("both him and his tribe" in your example sentence). So when they became VERBALS, they brought those retained objects with them into their new life. 

It can sometimes help (though it takes extra time) to physically cut the sentence up in to parts, put the entire verbal phrase into a ziplock bag, and then label the entire bag DIRECT OBJECT. In your sentence, "to destroy both him and his tribe" would all go into the ziplock bag labeled DIRECT OBJECT. 

(And don't be discouraged! Some of us "get" grammar but really wrestle with absolute values used in inequalities - it's okay, and we parents can learn, too! *glances at Algebra II book* )

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yes, the phrase  "to destroy both him and his tribe sits on a tree" is a DO with "to destroy" as the infinitive and "both him and his tribe" being a compound direct object of the infinitive

ETA: I see you have the key. This might be a case when you need to do some googling to understand the uses of infinitives better. Here is a place to start: 

http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/diagrams2/one_pager1.htm

 

then

http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/diagrams/diagrams.htm

Edited by cintinative

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8 hours ago, Lucy the Valiant said:

This explanation may or may not help, so if you read it and find it confusing, just delete it. 

The 3 English verbals (participles, infinitives, and gerunds . . . yes, that spells PIG, and yes, I have a poster, haha) are all words that USED TO BE verbs, but are now functioning as either adjectives, adverbs, or nouns. So back in their former life as verbs, some of them had objects ("both him and his tribe" in your example sentence). So when they became VERBALS, they brought those retained objects with them into their new life. 

It can sometimes help (though it takes extra time) to physically cut the sentence up in to parts, put the entire verbal phrase into a ziplock bag, and then label the entire bag DIRECT OBJECT. In your sentence, "to destroy both him and his tribe" would all go into the ziplock bag labeled DIRECT OBJECT. 

(And don't be discouraged! Some of us "get" grammar but really wrestle with absolute values used in inequalities - it's okay, and we parents can learn, too! *glances at Algebra II book* )

This is helpful, thank you  so much!

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29 minutes ago, cintinative said:

yes, the phrase  "to destroy both him and his tribe sits on a tree" is a DO with "to destroy" as the infinitive and "both him and his tribe" being a compound direct object of the infinitive

ETA: I see you have the key. This might be a case when you need to do some googling to understand the uses of infinitives better. Here is a place to start: 

http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/diagrams2/one_pager1.htm

 

then

http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/diagrams/diagrams.htm

Yes, I have the key 😉

Thanks I will check those pages out...

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