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I need good ideas on turning rote division facts practice into more engaging & fun stuff. Any commercial or homemade card or board games out there you like? Anything else you use to turn it into a more engaging exercise?

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Make a deck of cards for the students out of index card and a sharpie marker.

Put the division expression on one card and the quotient on another. Never put the whole equation on a single card.

So you'll have one card that says: 
27 / 3 = 
and another card that says 9

And flip the equation around so that you have some cards that say

3 =                            
and corresponding card that says  27 / 9

Write some of the division expressions as fractions, some using the "division house" and some with the division sign so that the students get used to writing and reading all 3 forms as division. 

With these cards you can play memory/match where you turn 2 cards over and match division expressions to their corresponding quotient cards. If you make a match you get to pick up the cards, if you miss you turn the cards back over and the next person gets a turn.

You can additionally split the decks of expressions and answers, between two people and they play war with the cards and decide if the greater or smaller number wins.
So if you're doing lesser number wins, then 9 loses to 16/8 because the quotient of 16/8 =2, so you have 9 vs 2.

You can use JUST the quotients and a 15 second timer. You hold up the quotient and the kids go back and forth trying to get the "last word" Who ever names the last (correct) division with that quotient wins the card. So if you hold up the quotient 4, the kids could say 36/9, 16/4, 20/5, 40/10, 100/25, etc.

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Division Go Fish  deal as usual, but when requesting, must use an expression.  For ex, if you are fishing for a 3, you would say "I'm fishing for cards that are 9 divided by 3s".  No repeating the same expression. 

I haven't played the commercial game Monster Sock Factory, but I've heard one good review. 

math blaster, mathplayground websites have games too

 

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We found here that once multiplication facts were solid the division facts came with them on their own. 7×9=63 so we know 63/7 is 9 and 63/9 is 7. We hit it home with equations like this: 7 x t=63 which helped that automatic transition. I am sure you probably do this but my kids abhor fact learning of any kind 😂 as soon as I showed them they already really had them they were relieved and off and running. So when they are up against a division problem now 36÷9 then they just say "ok, what times 9 is 36" 

We have also been able to modify the Dragon Time game a bit to include division which helps with facts and pairing. 

Edited by nixpix5
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9 minutes ago, nixpix5 said:

We found here that once multiplication facts were solid the division facts came with them on their own. 7×9=63 so we know 63/7 is 9 and 63/9 is 7. We hit it home with equations like this: 7 x t=63 which helped that automatic transition. I am sure you probably do this but my kids abhor fact learning of any kind 😂 as soon as I showed them they already really had them they were relieved and off and running. So when they are up against a division problem now 36÷9 then they just say "ok, what times 9 is 36" 

She has most multiplication facts down (after much work & practice) but sees division facts as a daunting task even though she knows they're inverse operations. I've been thinking about solidiying the connection with moveable numbers so she can both see and 'feel' this relationship again.

Edited by Earthmerlin
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Have you seen this book? 

https://www.amazon.com/Division-Facts-That-Stick-Master/dp/1945841206

There is a whole series put out by PHP, I'm going to try the multiplication and addition books for my girls but can't give a review as I've not used them yet. They are well-reviewed. I'll be looking at division once multiplication is mastered my 6th grader always says she knows all her facts but her speed and automaticity is just not where it needs to be.

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Since multiplication 'Kaboom' was such a hit, I believe I'll make a division one. We're a games-loving family so I'm betting this'll help. We also have 'Tri-Facta' which never really piqued her interest but I'll try it out again too.

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