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Night Elf

SAD light?

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My dd20 is interested in trying a light. She thinks she's affected by seasons and winter is really rough on her. Can anyone advise me on this?

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I have one, but can't find the same one on amazon now. It is REALLY helpful to me. To the point that my husband reminds me to use it as he can tell a difference in my mood if I forget. I think I just went by reviews, honestly. 

Use the lamp in the morning, and then in the evening try melatonin. It seems part of the issue with SAD is just a shift in your circadian rhythm so you are more awake at night than you should be and groggy and depressed and non functioning during the day. My description of SAD is that it feels like my coffee no longer works. The light totally helps. 

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The studies use lights that are 10,000 lux. Carex is one brand that, IIRC, was used in studies but they are kind of rickety.

 

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3 minutes ago, BeachGal said:

The studies use lights that are 10,000 lux. Carex is one brand that, IIRC, was used in studies but they are kind of rickety.

 

 

I purchased a 10,000 lux Carex this year from amazon (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00PCN4UVU/ref=oh_aui_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1) and have been pleased with it. I'm looking for the website that recommended it, but can't dig it up at the moment. The link was suggested by a local therapist as having reasonable recommendations by a doctor who had looked at the research for light therapy and depression in depth.

Erica in OR

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So I can see where it's helpful during the winter. Is there any benefit to using it during other seasons? I imagine she wouldn't use it during the summer on hot bright days, right? 

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I bought one for my boss for Christmas. He swears it helps him, but he's a susceptible type so who knows if it really does or if it's a placebo effect. I suppose it doesn't matter as long as one thinks they feel better. 

They are inexpensive, so if she's struggling there's no harm in trying one.

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Ok I have a dumb question. When using these, do you use eye protection? I mean, you don't stare into it, right? You just have it on and sit there but don't look right at it, correct? Can you read or do anything else? 

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1 hour ago, Chris in VA said:

Ok I have a dumb question. When using these, do you use eye protection? I mean, you don't stare into it, right? You just have it on and sit there but don't look right at it, correct? Can you read or do anything else? 

You can do whatever. I have it on a shelf a bit above my desk, and read, use the computer, whatever. Or I'll put it in the kitchen also on a shelf and cook breakfast while standing near it. 

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14 hours ago, Erica in OR said:

 

I purchased a 10,000 lux Carex this year from amazon (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00PCN4UVU/ref=oh_aui_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1) and have been pleased with it. I'm looking for the website that recommended it, but can't dig it up at the moment. The link was suggested by a local therapist as having reasonable recommendations by a doctor who had looked at the research for light therapy and depression in depth.

Erica in OR

 

This is the one I have. It is on a stand so the light shines down on you, which is more effective. 

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Whether it’s placebo affect or not, I find my light helpful. I mostly use it in the winter but occasionally if it’s summer and it’s been really cloudy I’ll pull it out. I set mine on the bathroom counter while I’m getting ready for the day or on the breakfast table while I’m eating. I don’t stare directly into it, but it’s close to my eyes. Mine has a timer so I start with 15 minutes and work my way up to longer sessions. 

I find actually being outside, especially if I can exercise at the same time helps more than the light, but the light is still helpful.

 

I have this light: https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000W8Y7FY/ref=mp_s_a_1_1_a_it?ie=UTF8&qid=1549828376&sr=8-1&keywords=nature+bright+suntouch+plus&dpPl=1&dpID=41vSvZmJNEL&ref=plSrch

I have no idea what the ion button does, I’ve never noticed that it does anything. 

Edited by Rachel

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15 minutes ago, Rachel said:

Whether it’s placebo affect or not, I find my light helpful. I mostly use it in the winter but occasionally if it’s summer and it’s been really cloudy I’ll pull it out. I set mine on the bathroom counter while I’m getting ready for the day or on the breakfast table while I’m eating. I don’t stare directly into it, but it’s close to my eyes. Mine has a timer so I start with 15 minutes and work my way up to longer sessions. 

I find actually being outside, especially if I can exercise at the same time helps more than the light, but the light is still helpful.

 

I have this light: https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000W8Y7FY/ref=mp_s_a_1_1_a_it?ie=UTF8&qid=1549828376&sr=8-1&keywords=nature+bright+suntouch+plus&dpPl=1&dpID=41vSvZmJNEL&ref=plSrch

I have no idea what the ion button does, I’ve never noticed that it does anything. 

I find being outdoors doesn't work if it is winter..even when I spent hours outside. The light was a miracle for me

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I have a Verilux HappyLight, but I only use it during prolonged periods of gloomy weather. Our house is filled with natural light and I also work outside for at least four hours a day, so I usually am able to stave off SAD. It's only when we have day after day of very dark skies that I find the light to be helpful.

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Okay, thanks everyone. She wants to research it a bit more. I'm not sure why. I've offered to pay for it. She's wondering if she'll actually use it. She just can't shake her depression and her days are draggy and mentally draining. She stays inside most of the time. She only has a couple of classes each day but the buildings are close together so she isn't outside a lot. She's skeptical it will work. I told her what the heck, why not try?

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19 minutes ago, Night Elf said:

Okay, thanks everyone. She wants to research it a bit more. I'm not sure why. I've offered to pay for it. She's wondering if she'll actually use it. She just can't shake her depression and her days are draggy and mentally draining. She stays inside most of the time. She only has a couple of classes each day but the buildings are close together so she isn't outside a lot. She's skeptical it will work. I told her what the heck, why not try?

Draggy and draining are exactly how I felt. Seriously, it won't hurt. Just have her plug it in near where she sits or gets ready in the morning. They often have a timer, so set it for 15 or 20 minutes and then ignore it while she does her normal thing in the morning. It really did help me. A LOT. 

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I just got a HappyLight for Christmas and am ashamed to report I have not used it yet.

I do walk the dog outside at least once a day so I get some sunshine from that, when we have sunshine. The trouble here in Ohio is that, often in the winter, we can have full weeks of gloomy weather and rain.  That is why a lot of my friends have them.  Most of my homeschooling friends just set it up on the table at breakfast for a short time. 

 

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Light and dark cycles affect circadian rhythms as does the time we eat and don’t eat. Satchin Panda is a researcher at the Salk Institute who studies circadian rhythms and how they affect our health. His research would be an excellent place to start. He recently wrote a book but here are his two interviews with researcher Rhonda Patrick for anyone interested.

https://www.foundmyfitness.com/episodes/satchin-panda

https://www.foundmyfitness.com/episodes/satchin-round-2

If you can get out for a period of time in the morning sun, there’s no need to do the therapy light as well. If cloudy, then yes.

Ideally, you’d want to begin avoiding or switching blue light sources to red/amber around evening, maybe 7-8 pm, as your body begins to create more melatonin. We use Hue lightbulbs. Then you’d want to get to bed 10-11 pm and sleep in a pitch black room. That would be followed by morning bright light exposure for a period of time.

It’s not necessary to look directly into the light source. It can shine through your eyelid as well. (But no 😎.) Sitting next to a therapy light reading or looking at your tablet in the morning would be fine. You’d ideally want the light source to be within a certain distance, too.

Bright light therapy should be used with care by those who have bipolar. For them, it might be better to wait until about noon before using the bright light.

https://news.northwestern.edu/stories/2017/october/bright-light-therapy-at-midday-helped-patients-with-bipolar-disorder/

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1 minute ago, BeachGal said:

Light and dark cycles affect circadian rhythms as does the time we eat and don’t eat. Satchin Panda is a researcher at the Salk Institute who studies circadian rhythms and how they affect our health. His research would be an excellent place to start. He recently wrote a book but here are his two interviews with researcher Rhonda Patrick for anyone interested.

https://www.foundmyfitness.com/episodes/satchin-panda

https://www.foundmyfitness.com/episodes/satchin-round-2

If you can get out for a period of time in the morning sun, there’s no need to do the therapy light as well. If cloudy, then yes.

Ideally, you’d want to begin avoiding or switching blue light sources to red/amber around evening, maybe 7-8 pm, as your body begins to create more melatonin. We use Hue lightbulbs. Then you’d want to get to bed 10-11 pm and sleep in a pitch black room. That would be followed by morning bright light exposure for a period of time.

It’s not necessary to look directly into the light source. It can shine through your eyelid as well. (But no 😎.) Sitting next to a therapy light reading or looking at your tablet in the morning would be fine. You’d ideally want the light source to be within a certain distance, too.

Bright light therapy should be used with care by those who have bipolar. For them, it might be better to wait until about noon before using the bright light.

https://news.northwestern.edu/stories/2017/october/bright-light-therapy-at-midday-helped-patients-with-bipolar-disorder/

I live in sunny(ish) Florida, and was taking the dog to the park for an hour or more every morning and it didn't help the way the silly light did for 15 to 20 minutes - someone suggested it was the angle of the sun at this time of year? That makes it ineffective? 

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I don’t know if the angle of the sun would affect it. Maybe... That is kind of odd that the therapy light helped even though you were walking in the morning in sunlight which is around 100,000 lux or so.

Satchin Panda has talked about how evening and night sources of light are a big source of the problem for some because the light interferes with the production of melatonin.

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