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faithmom

Algebra 1 woes and need a different curriculum

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I've been out of the loop for a while since I've just been using what my 1st child used for math. My 2nd child isn't understanding algebra 1 at all. She doesn't have dyscalulia, but just simply is in over her head. We've used grades K-6 grades CLE Sunrise math (did ok, but wanted more detail), 7th & part of 8th grade Teaching Textbooks (didn't like online), and remainder of 8th - now part of 9th grade Chalk Dust math with no luck 3 months into algebra 1. Every year we are just not getting it 100%. We repeated pre-algebra.  We are now in Chalk Dust Algebra 1 and getting nowhere. There are numerous curricula that are book, dvd, cd-rom, and online. I don't know what all is offered anymore and I don't have $$ to waste. A main home school review website is permanently closed  and I need help. Math curriculum for struggling high school Algebra 1? If you have a struggling student, what curriculum did you choose for Algebra 1. I'm searching the forum as well, but alot of math posts are old.

(UPDATE: We have found a solution. See my last reply.)

(2nd update given. We love Math Relief!)

 

 

 

Edited by faithmom
We completed Math Relief Algebra 1 and passed! We are now near the end of Algebra 2 and doing well. Next will be Math Relief Geometry. My husband still watches the dvd lessons and grades her work. Math Relief has been fantastic!
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How did she do in CLE math?  I really do think CLE math is a solid foundation for pre-algebra so if she was passing all of her tests as she should, I've got more questions for you...please chime back in.

We own Chalk Dust Algebra 1, and I'm happy to help you troubleshoot. Where is she at now? Are you watching the DVDs together? How closely are you working with her? Where would you say the breakdown in skills is happening?

If ChalkDust is falling apart, I could point you towards Math U See (which is where I personally would head next). I'm not overly impressed with Teaching Textbooks, though that does seem to work for some families.

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My husband pretty much hand holds her in Chalk Dust. He says it's deer in the headlights with word problems. CLE topics moved too fast. My husband teaches math and tutors her daily. He didn't like Math U See when we attempted it with 1st child (in college now) because the tricks and shortcuts were confusing. We are in Chapter 3 Chalk Dust Algebra 1 2nd edition. It's an advanced program and moves quickly, but we used it because I already owned it. My mistake. We need to slow down and regroup.

 

Edited by faithmom
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my daughter who really struggled with Algebra 1 did great with a program called Math Relief Algebra.  We tried 4 different programs before finding this one.  It is a DVD program...but it is NOT fancy or flashy...just a guy teaching algebra step by step using a chalkboard and worksheets.  It is effective...but not at all entertaining.  

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I'm side by side comparing CLE 610 and Chalkdust Algebra 1 and the first two chapters of Chalkdust Algebra 1 are all covered in CLE 6th. I can't compare with what happened in Teaching Textbooks..... but I wonder if she's having a layout and vocabulary issue with the textbook itself or if she's having a math issue.

Can you give her the pre-test from Math U See and report back on how she's doing on the math itself?

This is the pre-algebra final exam. In looking over the material, most of it is covered in CLE6th. https://mathusee.com/pdfs/placement/prealgebra-unit_test-placement.pdf

Here is the answer key: https://mathusee.com/pdfs/placement/prealgebra-unit_test-placement.pdf

 

 

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kfeusse, thanks and I'll peek at that one. Thank you. Prairie, (hope ok to shorten name) I will do that for sure! I'll have her do that this weekend and post back here. Please look back at this post because I promise I will be back with that info. Thank you,too. If we can figure this out, I'll do whatever we can. She didn't understand CLE either, but we made it through to pass it somehow.

 

 

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I'll share my own experience with kids with math difficulties. I have one that is very mathematically inclined but struggles with math vocabulary. I have one that is straight up dyscalcic. I have one who is very weak and anxious in math.  My dh is very mathematically inclined and uses calculus in his daily work.  I kind of top out somewhere mid-Algebra II. I am not mathematically inclined at all and I have to work really, really hard at it even though many other things are very, very easy for me.  (I have a doctorate level degree in another field.)

If she has a weak foundation and she naturally struggles and she's very anxious---you flat out need to stop what you're doing and reassess. 

MUS can seem very gimmicky to those who are very mathematically inclined. I don't know that I disagree with that assessment myself. I like the geometry program best of the four high school levels.  ChalkDust is a pretty rigorous program (not tip-poppy hard but pushing towards there).  If she is falling apart in chapter 3, which is the first new material and you've been hanging out there for over a year....I'd really give MUS a second hard look.

Things it DOES having going for it:

1. Very clean pages--no visual distraction there (much like CLE)

2. Limited problem set (much like CLE)--it doesn't seem as overwhelming

3. Opportunity to write directly in the textbook for many problems (good for kids who have weak working memory or handwriting issues)

4. Video instruction

5. Multi-step method.  Look. TBH, she's not likely a kid you can put in front of a DVD and toss a workbook at and wish for the best. I really think you need the multistep process in MUS. You teach and demonstrate. She does it with you. She then does it by herself.  The worksheets should be the culmination of the teaching process---not the main teaching method.  Does that make sense?

Having really sat down and gone through all four high school levels, if you make it through the calculus book, it kind of all comes together. We are planning on using the books with our dyscalcic kid, and possibly with our weaker, math phobic kid also. (She's still young enough I'm not sure exactly where she's headed).  I know a ton of math majors who used MUS and actually excelled in college level work. I wouldn't totally discount the program....

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I was typing up a post while you were typing...just caught it.  I'll make a sticky note to check back in, but if I don't, please pm me. I have a lot of balls up in the air right now, and it's easy for one to drop.  

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From what you're saying, if you can swing it, I think she needs a tutor or an online class with a teacher. I'm not sure what's going on exactly, but I think when you have a kid who truly struggles... sometimes TT or some of these easy end programs are a good fit... but often it's really just about getting the support and instruction that kids need. You're mentioning a lot of video based programs... My hunch is that she needs some good interaction more than she needs the exact right program.

However, another easy algebra I program that I didn't see mentioned is Key to Algebra. And you can definitely try using something like Hands on Equations to get her more fluent with working with equations. Or Dragonbox, which is an app that really helps kids visualize algebra.

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In case anyone is following this post, here is the link for the answers.https://www.mathusee.com/secure/teacher-resources/placement-test-solutions/prealgebra-answers.pdf

I guess what is hardest to watch is that my husband walks her through her math, even dvd instruction. He watches it with her, goes over examples with her on paper, assigns work, checks it and redoes the missed problems. He shows a variety of ways if needed. Chalk Dust dvd videos...she says they are too long and too much information. With Chalk Dust, she gets about 90% of the WORD prombems wrong and about  60% of the regular numeral (not a word problem) wrong. We can't afford to pay anyone, we've had financial hardship. I know it's hard to say we can't afford it, even though we can't afford not to for education sake. It's between a rock and a hard place. This week we signed up for a trial with unlockmath. Our issue with it is that we've experienced alot of tech problems and it's frustrating my child. It's online interface is not working properly. I've looked at the following websites today: Mr D Math, Liveonlinemath, Kinetic Books, A+ Interactive Math. (A+ Interactive Math is what I would lean toward from the list. They  help low income families with affordability.  

 

Edited by faithmom
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14 hours ago, faithmom said:

I've been out of the loop for a while since I've just been using what my 1st child used for math. My 2nd child isn't understanding algebra 1 at all. She doesn't have dyscalulia, but just simply is in over her head. We've used grades K-6 grades CLE Sunrise math, 7th & part of 8th grade Teaching Textbooks, and remainder of 8th - now part of 9th grade Chalk Dust math with no luck. Every year we are just not getting it. We repeated pre-algebra.  We are now in Chalk Dust Algebra 1 and getting nowhere. There are numerous curricula that are book, dvd, cd-rom, and online. I don't know what all is offered anymore and I don't have $$ to waste. A main home school review website is permanently closed  and I need help. Math curriculum for struggling high school Algebra 1? If you have a struggling student, what curriculum did you choose for Algebra 1. I'm searching the forum as well, but alot of math posts are old.

 

Bolded above in the OP suggests to me that there is something going on here that probably does, as someone upthread suggested, require a Tutor or some other form of outside help. The DH is into Math, but the student may not be able to understand him.  We are also a very low-income family, so I understand that part of the issue the family is facing quite well.  I wonder if there is something on KhanAcademy or some other web site that will be more easily understood by the student?   Algebra 1 is extremely critical and if she is not prepared for that, she must back up and get a grasp on what leads up to that, which should be reviewed in a good pre-algebra course.  Good luck to her!

Edited by Lanny
Moved my reply out of the Quote Box to below that

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Have you seen the Key to Algebra series of workbooks. It really steps the child through how to do it and it is inexpensive. It is not always recommended but I like it to help a child get started on the concepts and it is gentle.

I used it with my oldest. He really struggled understanding fractions until I did the Key To Fractions set with him. And as Lanny said I would try Khan Academy also.

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13 hours ago, faithmom said:

In case anyone is following this post, here is the link for the answers.https://www.mathusee.com/secure/teacher-resources/placement-test-solutions/prealgebra-answers.pdf

I guess what is hardest to watch is that my husband walks her through her math, even dvd instruction. He watches it with her, goes over examples with her on paper, assigns work, checks it and redoes the missed problems. He shows a variety of ways if needed. Chalk Dust dvd videos...she says they are too long and too much information. With Chalk Dust, she gets about 90% of the WORD prombems wrong and about  60% of the regular numeral (not a word problem) wrong. We can't afford to pay anyone, we've had financial hardship. I know it's hard to say we can't afford it, even though we can't afford not to for education sake. It's between a rock and a hard place. This week we signed up for a trial with unlockmath. Our issue with it is that we've experienced alot of tech problems and it's frustrating my child. It's online interface is not working properly. I've looked at the following websites today: Mr D Math, Liveonlinemath, Kinetic Books, A+ Interactive Math. (A+ Interactive Math is what I would lean toward from the list. They  help low income families with affordability.  

 

I'm not familiar with all the options you're looking at, but there's a massive difference between something like Live Online Math where you have a live class that meets three times a week with a real teacher who is going to give individual attention to your kid and their work... and something like A+ Interactive Math where you're just using adaptive software without a teacher. I think you need a teacher or tutor.

If you can't afford to do a live class or a tutor of some kind (and I get it! that's absolutely understandable!), I would not personally try another software based program. This would be the *fourth* video or software based program you will have tried. (TT, MUS's video teaching, and Chalkdust). I don't think it's worth it if you don't have the $. There's likely no magic program for a kid who is struggling this much. It's just going to take working with her. I second trying Khan, since it's free. And I'll say again that Key to Algebra is cheap and one of the better options for struggling learners.

You say she doesn't have dyscalculia, but have you had testing done? This sounds like it goes beyond the normal struggles with math and like it's been going on for awhile. Does she have another issue that's behind this - dyscalculia isn't the only issue that can cause math problems. Some insurance plans cover psych-ed testing if you've never had it done.

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I agree that there is no magic and directly working with her is what it will take. My advice is a lot of hard work, but it sounds like your husband is doing some of this already so I’ll go ahead and give a few ideas.

I have a child that greatly struggles with math. It takes years for her to get mostly solid with terms and skills. Instructions confuse her. Simplify vs. evaluate for example.  I have to explain the same things week after week as though they are new.  I could say much more.  I've wondered about Pysch-ed testing. Hers is not a typical problem, but dyscalculia did not fit at all. 

It was hard fought, but she did pass the College Algebra CLEP test recently. I have taught her through the first semester of precalculus, which in this text is mostly trigonometry. Now she is taking Stats I at a CC. Her last math ACT was 27.  I never, never expected her to get there.  New math concepts/skills are still not easy or quick to learn and she still forgets old things. But I firmly believe that everyone can get better, and gotten better she certainly has. 

Here are some of the things that I have done. First, I taught her math. No videos. When I realized that even though she was most of the way through geometry she still had arithmetic and algebra she didn't know, I dug in for a long fight with the problem (not with her!). At first daily I put 4-5 problems on post-it notes from the current or past concepts she missed that day. The next day she started with those. We did this each day. I tried to space the review a bit once she was getting them correct consistently. I did not worry about getting a certain amount done each day. I also limited the number of challenging problems and helped her through them.

I increased this really intense math review after she finished geometry and I was seeing that precious little was remembered long term. We went back to the beginning of algebra. I did let her try problems first that I thought she once knew how to do because I wanted her to struggle a bit to remember. Brain research shows that this helps even if they don’t remember. Especially (or only?) if you give feedback right away. Each concept/skill that we went over I put a problem on an index card with the answer and also sometimes work shown on the back. Each day we start with a 10-30 minute session of working problems on the flash cards (by this time this replaced the post-its). We did this all the way through the algebra book. I actually used a different book(Lial) than we had originally (Foerster) mainly because a sister was using the Foerster book. It helped that a medical event made she and I decide that an extra year of school for her was a wise plan and because we really only lost a half year I had a semester “extra”. If I hadn’t had that, then in your shoes I would have chosen a very easy Geometry program and continued algebra through the summer (lighter time wise) and even into the next year and used an easy geometry either alongside or after.  I agree with other posters here that algebra is foundational. If I had to choose I would do geometry light to get the time needed to make algebra I as solid as possible.

We also did some “two-a-days” We worked the full hour during the school day and 15-20 minutes many evenings. Because she was older, we also did the flash card plan with ACT problems cycling through the same problems for months and months before trying another practice test. This brought out other concepts she should have remembered and didn’t and forced problem solving type thinking.

It might be less stressful for your husband to just teach her from a text and choose his own problems rather than feeling that she has to get certain things done that the Chalkdust tells you. I’m not familiar with it though so maybe there is a way to use it in the way I have described and just cut down the quantity so the review gets a bigger chunk of time.

I could do better at explaining this sitting down next to you, but hopefully my unpolished post will give you some ideas.

 

 

 

 

 

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Kendall, thank you. It makes sense and I can see how this would help. I know we will find the right fit since we are determined to research and find what we need. Reading reviews and seeing what worked for others is helpful in decision making. I truly appreciate the detail in your reply. Thanks to all replies form others as well.

Edited by faithmom
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I would try Jacobs Algebra, starting at the beginning.  I would have your husband read the lesson with her (no videos), working out the examples (there are very few).  Then I would have him *sit with her* while she does the Set II problems.  Then she should do the Set I (review) and III (essentially a repeat of Set II with superficial differences) problems on her own later in the day (or the next morning--the point is that the times should be well spaced so that she has time to forget).

Jacobs is gentle, and doing the lesson in this way forces the *student* to do the bulk of the thinking, which is much more effective than watching video lectures or even a real human presenting examples.

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faithmom, we stopped homeschooling before we got to Algebra, though we did homeschool our oldest through 8th grade and used CLE through the 800 level. And I have two kids with diagnosed math disability and a third (the oldest) who finds math hard.

I know that you say it is not dyscalculia, but it sounds like it to me. Do you know that in the US, under federal law, your local public school must evaluate homeschoolers who are suspected of learning differences? For FREE?? The process can seem daunting, but there are many on the WTM boards who have been through it and are willing to offer advise about how you might proceed.

Knowing more about the root issues should help you as you teach her. And may help her understand herself better. And if you are planning for her to take college testing, such as the SAT and ACT, having documentation of the learning difficulties might help her get accommodations, such as extra time on the tests.

Having the school evaluate her might be really helpful. If you choose to move forward toward that, I would ask them to evaluate language issues, as well as math, since she has such difficulty with the language parts of math. It's a speech therapist who would do that part of the testing.

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My child just finished the test and did good on the Math U See. My child missed only a few topics that Chalk Dust hasn't covered yet. We talked to a former tester and he confirmed what we already knew. Chalk Dust is advanced and is fast paced. My child is a right brained thinker and math is a matter of finding the fit. The ones we've tried in the past are not for that type of learner. We talked again to my child and it looks like taking word problems/math vocabulary and creating the solution is confusing. We are going through the hint words for what means what.  I think this confirms that we are just moving too fast, have used the wrong materials, and need to slow down in Algebra 1. We pulled her old prealgebra. It's not as bad as I recalled, lol. We have a plan of action now and moving forward with that. Thanks for the tips.

 

Edited by faithmom
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The Learn Math Fast books helped my teens gain confidence in algebra. My middle child has always felt anxious about math, but this was a good step for her. I like that it is written in a conversational way to the student, the worksheets are just the right amount of problems, and you can email the author and she will answer right away. She even offered to call and talk with my child and work through some of the problems in the algebra 2 book. These books may be fine on their own, but since we have time, we went on to Video Text Algebra that I purchased used on ebay. There are no videos for LMF. The books are non-consumable since you will receive a code to go online and print the  worksheets out. We've tried out too many algebra programs before we found a good fit. 😞 Oh, I see you've already found a plan while I was typing. Good luck to you!

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Your DD sounds very much like mine. We are doing Pre-A this year (8th) and I was worried we'd have to do it again next year. Math, especially word problems, has always been a struggle for her. Our math time was very much like you describe with your husband and daughter. We've tried several programs (LoF, BA, MM, Key to Series...). This year we used Critical Thinking Co.'s Understanding Pre-Algebra. No distractions. Minimal color. Short bite size lessons written to the student with just enough work for her to practice and feel like she understood the lesson. We also use Jousting Armadillos once or twice a week. She has made huge strides in feeling like she gets math, being able to explain her reasoning, catching her own errors, how quickly she works, just overall solidifying her math skills (finally!) and even her willingness to do and enjoyment of math. Some of it has been due to the curriculum we used this year, some of it has been the approach we took. After talking with a math teacher and our tutor over the summer, I changed my approach this year (pretty much the only thing that stayed the same is math is our first subject every day). She now sits at the table with me and reads the Understanding Pre-Algebra lesson silently to herself. If she has questions/doesn't understand what she's reading, she can ask for me to help her understand. But I don't step in preemptively. She then lets me know when she's ready to begin working, and she talks me through the first problem. I used to talk her through the first problem (or few) and we would have so many errors in the later work. If she misses something when she works through the first problem, we go back to that particular part of the lesson and review it, and if she needs, I explain (diagram, sample problem, whatever) the step. Then she keeps working/talking me through the first problem until its done. After that, if she is confident she knows what to do, she does her work at the table quietly. If she doesn't think she's ready, she does the next problem with me, with her explaining her work again, and me helping her go back to review whatever isn't catching. Once she's working independently, If I see her drifting off or staring at the page or whatever for too long, I ask her what she needs to do next. That usually nudges her along. She will either get back to work, or, if she needs help, she actually asks for it (and she doesn't always need a nudge to ask for help). I've even seen her catching herself making a mistake while she works and correcting it! That's a huge step forward for us. She reviews it before turning it in, I correct it that day and we go over mistakes together at the end of the day. With Jousting Armadillos, we really use each lesson as a discussion topic. We read it together, she gives me her ideas and explains why she thinks that, sometimes I write out the work (she doesn't write anything for this one). I am keeping the focus of Jousting Armadillos to be entirely getting her to speak the language of math. To talk to me about what she's thinking, why and where it leads her. One of the hardest things I had to do this year was allowing long silences during our discussions and when doing her work when I asked her what she thought the next step/an answer might be. She knows I'm not going to drag her through the whole lesson again, or give her the answer so we can move on; and she knows she has all the time she needs to think on it (so she's not feeling pressured to just blurt out whatever random number/thought pops into mind). This year has been so successful, I plan to use CTCs Understanding Algebra and Crocodiles and Coconuts/Chuckles the Rocket Dog in the same way next year. 

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I see that you guys have a plan in place - yay!  I'll still share that my math struggler is doing well this year in MUS algebra. I started my kids in MUS ~15 years ago, but didn't stay with it because I didn't like it. I actually like MUS algebra much more than the lower levels, fwiw. 

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Lovemybeautifulgift, I feel like you understand where my post is coming from and we chatted over a cup of coffee. 😉This weekend we pulled things from our past curriculum, took the MUS test that a WTM mom suggested (child did good on it), ditched the Chalk Dust after talking to someone that confirmed it's too advanced, and realized my child is a right brain math learner. Of course! It makes sense to me why these 3 months of Chalk Dust algebra 1 have been a challenge! If you dig in, take a step back and take a deep breath, the clearer picture comes into view. I want parents that are in our shoes to know that there is a way to help a child even when there's not a disability. You can search math curriculum for right brain learners. That's not a disability, they just need to find the right curriculum and resources.

Students typically prefer 1 of 2 math styles: spiral math or mastery math. We've discovered our child needs mastery. In addition to this, there are key words in math word problems that translate into multiply, divide, etc. at the basic level of math. It becomes more intense in higher math levels. I need to write those key words down with the term of what to do. That's what I was meaning in regards to the language of math in word problems. The further along you go into higher math, the more translation. A link on translation in algebra is below. (If links aren't allowed, kindly let me know and I will remove them.)

https://www.purplemath.com/modules/translat2.htm

For what it's worth to someone in the future that needs help, we checked out MUS and Math Relief. We chose Math Relief. My husband will continue to be our child's guiding tutor. He works by our child's side and works through the process as he talks. He never pops in a video and leaves it up to her. The video reinforces what my husband discusses and shows in examples. I'm happy to use videos. Without them, we would not have the foundation to teach math during all these years of homeschooling with our children. There is more in the dvd instruction to reinforce the print material in a textbook. I'm thankful for dvd instruction.

Parents, keep moving forward with what you know your gut is telling you. Keep asking questions, research, and encourage your child. By asking questions, you will get answers and suggestions, but the end result is up to you to shuffle through the replies (because we all want to help) and find what you think will work. When you think you have found the curriculum, ask the math company if they have a 14 day or 30 day satisfaction guarantee. Most of them offer a guarantee.

Thanks to all for the replies. They kept pushing me forward, while my family asked questions among ourselves and others, and kept me asking for details from the publishers. I will come back in a few weeks and update our progress. The one thing we have to decide on is whether or not we will do the prealgrebra review before we begin the official algebra lessons.

Lovemybeautiful mentioned these 2, so here are the links.

http://arboralgebra.org/index.php It's the Arbor Algebra series that runs from pre-algebra through some geometry. Their books are Jousting Armadillos, Coconuts and Crocodiles, and Chuckles the Rocket Dog. Written to the student and with lots of practice, it breaks things down yet moves pretty quickly.
She also mentioned https://www.criticalthinking.com/understanding-algebra-i.html

Interested in more links for right brained learning? Go to these links:

check out this 1     https://www.thehomeschoolmom.com/right-brained-math/ 

here's the 2nd       https://www.thehomeschoolmom.com/more-right-brained-math-ideas/

The above link noted at "check out this 1" has one article stating it is likely that learning disorders are not the main cause behind the typical child having trouble with math. Read it for lots of info! There are many other things to read about it, but this was the most thorough. (The article mentions right brained learners can struggle with language arts studies of vocabulary, but my child doesn't struggle with that. We use Wordly Wise. I'm assuming it's not a one size fits all learning description.)

This is a really good read for parents and explains right brain learning. Link is below.

https://www.mathgiraffe.com/blog/how-to-activate-the-right-brain-in-math-class

Left brain learner: words, logic, numbers, reasoning, reading, writing, analyzing

Right brain learner: emotions, color, music art, visual, creative, spatial

It seems that one of my children is a left brained learner, but they do not like reading and writing. My 2nd child with math challenge in this post is a right brained learner loves reading and writing. Again, it's not 1 size fits all.

 

 

 

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My daughter struggled in Algebra.  We tried several different curricula and settled on Teaching Textbooks.  The combination of video plus audio and immediate feedback of right or wrong helped.  If she got it wrong, she could have the answer explained right then.  Still took us 2 years on Algebra 1 (9th and 10th).  Went to TT Geometry in 11th and then Algebra 2 in 12th.

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Best of luck to your daughter, @faithmom

Like @EKS suggested, I used Jacobs Algebra with my right-brained kid. (I would describe her as a creative, artsy, visual type.) The visual nature of Jacobs explanations spoke to her. She's still weak on word problems - never getting how to translate them into math to solve them. She's going through Dolciani Algebra I tests (and relevant chapters when needed) one day per week while she goes through geometry, too.

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I am going to make a suggestion that may or may not be applicable in your case, but I thought I'd mention. If you move to Geometry between Algebra I and II, you may need her to do more Algebra review than the average Geometry text is going to provide during that Geometry year so she can continue to move into Algebra II without a set back, forgetting some of the Algebra I stuff. Retention is so variable between people- and for some people a whole school term is a long time to go from Algebra I to Algebra II. But that is something I didn't see coming in our case, so thought I'd throw it out there as a consideration. 

ETA- If I had it to do over again, I'd have had my dd, who sounds similar in some ways to yours, do Alg 1, then Alg 2, then Geometry, since SAT or ACT wasn't in play. I listened to the advice that Geometry gave the brain a year to mature to grasp more complex topic, and I struggled in Algebra 2 taking it at 14, so that sounded like great advice to me. But I think in my dd's case with the benefit of hindsight, she would have benefited from the continuity and momentum we had going from Algebra I directly into II. I think that's going to be a case by case thing maybe- I just wish it wasn't all so segmented subject wise and was more cohesive. 

Edited by Æthelthryth the Texan
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👆🏻👆🏻👆🏻Thank you for your advice. I just pulled up past discussions on WTM board. It looks like, as you said, we need to do Alg 1 And Alg 2 back to back. At least, that's how parents are using Math Relief. One of the replies wasn't that hip on Math Relief Geometry, though. 

Edited by faithmom

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On ‎2‎/‎2‎/‎2019 at 6:01 PM, Mona said:

The Learn Math Fast books helped my teens gain confidence in algebra. My middle child has always felt anxious about math, but this was a good step for her. I like that it is written in a conversational way to the student, the worksheets are just the right amount of problems, and you can email the author and she will answer right away. She even offered to call and talk with my child and work through some of the problems in the algebra 2 book. These books may be fine on their own, but since we have time, we went on to Video Text Algebra that I purchased used on ebay. There are no videos for LMF. The books are non-consumable since you will receive a code to go online and print the  worksheets out. We've tried out too many algebra programs before we found a good fit. 😞 Oh, I see you've already found a plan while I was typing. Good luck to you!

Does the series cover the traditional topics taught in Algebra 2? We used Harold Jacobs for Algebra 1 and can't find an option for Algebra 2 that doesn't seem overwhelming.

Thanks,

Debbie

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On ‎2‎/‎2‎/‎2019 at 2:35 PM, EKS said:

I would try Jacobs Algebra, starting at the beginning.  I would have your husband read the lesson with her (no videos), working out the examples (there are very few).  Then I would have him *sit with her* while she does the Set II problems.  Then she should do the Set I (review) and III (essentially a repeat of Set II with superficial differences) problems on her own later in the day (or the next morning--the point is that the times should be well spaced so that she has time to forget).

Jacobs is gentle, and doing the lesson in this way forces the *student* to do the bulk of the thinking, which is much more effective than watching video lectures or even a real human presenting examples.

Any ideas as to what to use for Algebra 2 after using Jacobs for Algebra 1?

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1 hour ago, dovrar said:

Does the series cover the traditional topics taught in Algebra 2? We used Harold Jacobs for Algebra 1 and can't find an option for Algebra 2 that doesn't seem overwhelming.

Thanks,

Debbie

Dovrar, The order of topics throughout the three volumes of algebra (volumes 3, 5, and 6) are not in a typical order. I wouldn’t recommend using just the one book from LMF for algebra 2.

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2 hours ago, dovrar said:

Any ideas as to what to use for Algebra 2 after using Jacobs for Algebra 1?

I wouldn't let the lack of a Jacobs Algebra II dissuade you from using his Algebra I text.  If it works (and by "it" I mean the text combined with a very hands on teaching approach) for your daughter, by the time she completes it, she may have a very different relationship with math and as a result, you may have different needs.

That said, if she still needs a gentle approach, Lial's Intermediate Algebra would fit the bill.  If she can handle (and wants) something a bit more, Derek Owens Algebra II is excellent.

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UPDATE FROM ORIGINAL POSTER: I'm so glad that we found Math Relief Algebra I. Even more so, my daughter is happy that we found it! This has been a game changer for my daughter. Mr. Leonard Firebaugh teaches in baby steps and it's done step by step in shorter video lessons. No more 45 minute to 1 hour lessons like we had in the Chalk Dust dvds. She's doing great with her grades and is understanding algebra now! We are forever grateful to the moms that suggested Math Relief. Thank you!

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