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Creative, Easy to Use Interactive 11th grade History/Government?


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My daughter has proven this year that she can slog through dry academic course work using an online system.  While we've enjoyed the ease of use and the automatic grading and scheduling, I do think that my extremely right brained creative daughter is suffering from the overload of facts, quizzes and tests...

Next year my son will be in college, and I'd like something we can do partly together.  Just the like "old days!" Reading together on the couch, and notebooking, summarizing, and creative projects would be great.  

Sonlight is out because it's too depressing...

If it had:

Some literature (but not as much as SL!)

Upbeat

Open and go (really I am lazy nowadays, if I have to plan anything it won't get done)

Has some activities that might require some right brained, creative work as far as what she does...

 

ETA: It does need actually-clearly-assignable work thought because my dd will try to get out of everything she can and while she is extremely creative and artistic, she would rather do her own art and projects than an assigned one, that is extremely open ended. 🙂

Edited by Calming Tea
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For the "creative" and "interactive" and "activities" aspects you are requesting, I suggest going with actual participation in model/mock aspects of gov't, watch some feature films/documentaries -- that would be self-teaching (or be taught by the advisors of the interactive programs, so not reliant on you and it gets your extroverted DD out and socializing). And then just fill in any gaps missing from the program involvement with a quick "check the boxes" workbook, which would be the "open and go" part of your request.

"Creative Activities" Ideas:
- YMCA Youth & Government -- model legislative and judicial branches of gov't
- TEEN Pact -- (Christian); legislative branch of gov't
- Constitutional Rights Foundation: Mock Trial -- model judicial branch of gov't
- Junior State of America (here is the So. Cal. chapter) -- political conventions, discussion/debate, etc.
- American Model United Nations -- high school conference model UN session

Edited by Lori D.
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Our homeschool convention does a class some years like the ones Lori D. describes for their teen activity. My odd did one that was how a bill becomes law, and they had elections, speeches, votes and created their bill and tried to get it passed in their class. It is was really good. I will do any more that they offer for both of my dds. 

With my right brained daughter, I haven't decided exactly what we will be doing for the history side of Am. History next year, but whatever we do, we are adding a History of Fashion course to it. I have some Dover historical fashion coloring books and a notebooking journal picked out. I have a unit study picked out with projects to go along, and the unit study itself covers several other things like some computer skills and proper MLA citations for papers from my first look over of the lesson plans. But just the class alone will solidify the history for my right brained daughter. We attended a talk at Mt. Vernon this summer that was on the fashion of the Washingtons and how it reflected history and what was happening and it was amazingly informative, sparking our interest to do our own class when we get to Am. History. Once I go through the plans I will know how much of a credit she will get for this as an elective. Anyway, its not plans for the history yet, but I like this so far. I think it will make whatever else I do be retained better and that the projects and fun stuff will come from this. 

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27 minutes ago, Lori D. said:

For the "creative" and "interactive" and "activities" aspects you are requesting, I suggest going with actual participation in model/mock aspects of gov't, watch some feature films/documentaries -- that would be self-teaching (or be taught by the advisors of the interactive programs, so not reliant on you and it gets your extroverted DD out and socializing). And then just fill in any gaps missing from the program involvement with a quick "check the boxes" workbook, which would be the "open and go" part of your request.

"Creative Activities" Ideas:
- YMCA Youth & Government -- model legislative and judicial branches of gov't
- TEEN Pact -- (Christian); legislative branch of gov't
- Constitutional Rights Foundation: Mock Trial -- model judicial branch of gov't
- Junior State of America (here is the So. Cal. chapter) -- political conventions, discussion/debate, etc.
- American Model United Nations -- high school conference model UN session

 

My dd is an introvert, we talked about the Mock Trial as well as the Debate Group we have here (which requires extensive historical research) but that was totally not up her ally 🙂

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6 minutes ago, Calming Tea said:

...My dd is an introvert...🙂


I guess I'm remembering a number of your posts from just a few years back about trying to balance your introvert needs of not having to take DD out to lots of extracurricular activities so she could have her social needs met... guess that's what led to think she was an extrovert. 😉 

BEST of luck in finding what best fits all of DD's and your needs for a gov't credit! Warmest regards, Lori D.

Edited by Lori D.
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Following ...

We did A Noble Experiment and it was a.w.f.u.l. and I really want something different next time around. But I don't want it to be a boring slog, and I want to interact with them about it. They already do debate and I count that as an EC, so we need something separate to check the "US Gov" box for their transcript.

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Going a bit off topic here- So is it normal to do a full credit history and a separate credit for government? I was looking at the required coursework for our state program, and it only listed three required social studies courses, one of which must be American history. So since my odd has already done two years of world history, next year she needs Am. History into which we would intertwine government. But does it need to be a full other credit? 

Edited by 2_girls_mommy
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1 hour ago, 2_girls_mommy said:

Going a bit off topic here- So is it normal to do a full credit history and a separate credit for government? I was looking at the required coursework for our state program, and it only listed three required social studies courses, one of which must be American history. So since my odd has already done two years of world history, next year she needs Am. History into which we would intertwine government. But does it need to be a full other credit? 

I do a full credit of USH and a half credit of Government. That's what is typical here in IN and I want my kids' transcripts to be comparable to other IN kids when it comes to college admissions. I also require a full credit of world history and a full credit of some other type of social science/history, but that's my own personal requirements, not from the state.

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3 hours ago, 2_girls_mommy said:

Going a bit off topic here- So is it normal to do a full credit history and a separate credit for government? I was looking at the required coursework for our state program, and it only listed three required social studies courses, one of which must be American history. So since my odd has already done two years of world history, next year she needs Am. History into which we would intertwine government. But does it need to be a full other credit? 


Short answer -- No.
0.5 credit of Government + 1.0 credit of American History usually fulfills requirements.

Long answer:
Certain Social Studies (sometimes called Social Science) credits are often required for not only high school graduation, but ALSO for college admission. If you live in a low-regulation state, then the credit requirements for public high school graduation probably do not apply to you. Or, if you do have regulations for homeschool high school, it sounds like you are working to meet those.

However, all *colleges* have a list of required credits (to be completed during high school), in order to be eligible for admission as a freshman to the college, and those requirements are certain amounts of credits in the academic subjects of English, Math, Science, Social Studies, and Foreign Language. (Colleges require credits as "proof", along with an ACT/SAT score, that the student is prepared to handle the rigor of college-level material.)

In both cases (high school and college), the credits most frequently required for Social Studies include:
   1 credit = American (U.S.) History  (required by many colleges)
   1 credit = World History and/or World Geography  (required by some colleges, but more often by high schools)
   0.5 credit each = Government and Economics  (required by some colleges; required by many high schools)

So in addition to the 1.0 credit of American History and the 0.5 credit of Government, you may also want to consider completing another 0.5 credit of Social Studies -- Economics.

In case it helps, below is a "College Prep" list of credits that blends the most typically required sets of credits for a majority of high schools (graduation) and colleges (admission). And even if you know your student is not interested in college or doesn't plan on going to college, it's always a good idea to shoot for a "college prep" set of credits to keep open as many future doors as possible, as children change their minds a lot. While this list may feel "restrictive" and curtailing of freedom of studies, do bear in mind that *how* you accomplish the credits, or *what you use*, is totally up to you, and there can be a LOT of freedom to follow student interests AND still accomplish required credits. 😉 

Wishing you all the BEST as you continue your high school homeschool journey! Warmest regards, Lori D.
 

4 credits = English
3-4 credits = Math  (Alg. 1, Geom. Alg. 2 + many colleges want a 4th math above Alg. 2; also, STEM students would need higher maths)
3-4 credits = Science, with labs  (most colleges = flexible; some want Biology and/or Chemistry; STEM students would need 4 credits)
3-4 credits = Social Studies  (many colleges want 1 credit = Amer. Hist.; some also want 1 credit = World Hist/Geog, or 0.5 credit each Gov't & Econ)
2-4 credits = Foreign Language, same language
1 credit = Fine Arts
4-8+ credits = Electives  (Computer, Logic, Health, PE, Bible/Religious Studies, Vocational-Tech classes, personal interest classes, additional credits in Fine Arts, "Academic Electives" (additional credits in the above 5 academic subjects, beyond required credits), etc.)
22-28+ credits = total credits

Edited by Lori D.
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3 hours ago, 2_girls_mommy said:

...next year she needs Am. History into which we would intertwine government.


PS -- Just adding 2 thoughts:

The first thought is that doing American History and Government simultaneously is a GREAT way to enhance studies! The 2 topics naturally "speak" back and forth to one another, so, enjoy! 🙂

The second thought is completely off-topic, BUT... I note from your signature that DD is 11th grade this year -- have you been doing research on colleges this year, and have you narrowed down a list of what schools DD would like to visit this spring or over the summer? I mention this because waiting until 12th grade to *start* thinking about college is really very very late in the process, as many colleges have early admission application deadlines these days -- as early as mid-Oct. or Nov., or the start of Dec. -- and students who apply early have the best shot at scholarships.

Disregard if you already are looking ahead and researching/planning! 🙂

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4 hours ago, Lori D. said:


PS -- Just adding 2 thoughts:

The first thought is that doing American History and Government simultaneously is a GREAT way to enhance studies! The 2 topics naturally "speak" back and forth to one another, so, enjoy! 🙂

The second thought is completely off-topic, BUT... I note from your signature that DD is 11th grade this year -- have you been doing research on colleges this year, and have you narrowed down a list of what schools DD would like to visit this spring or over the summer? I mention this because waiting until 12th grade to *start* thinking about college is really very very late in the process, as many colleges have early admission application deadlines these days -- as early as mid-Oct. or Nov., or the start of Dec. -- and students who apply early have the best shot at scholarships.

Disregard if you already are looking ahead and researching/planning! 🙂

Yes, we know which college she is going into. I am dealing with the college requirements for her, dealing with the department she is going into on the phone and have set up an appointment to meet in person, and I am also dealing with our state requirements for a scholarship program they offer which is different from what most people tell me most colleges require. But since I am only dealing with the one college we have chosen, I haven't looked at others'. The one we have chosen is the only one in our state with a classics department, so that is what we are going with since her scholarship will cover that. I am also trying to nail down right now which dual enrollment classes she will be taking if any. Since we have done WTM all the way, she will end up with way more than the required social studies credits. I just wonderered what others do. It sounds like I am on track in my current thoughts of what I want to do. 

And then further up, I am planning my next year's 10th grader with the fashion of history to supplement her history since she is my artist, and too young for DE here, and will be doing it all at home. So basically I have a lot going on in my mind as to history/government currently between the two high schoolers and a lot of options -do I want to put the senior in a DE government and a DE Am. History next year or one or the other and one at home, or since we are doing it at home with the 9th grader anyway, or do it all at home and DE something else, and how many credits should I sort it into?  Just trying to straighten it all out and nail it down.  

ETA, in my usual style I ramble, but wasn't super clear. What I found was that I had it in my mind that govt. is required, but found when revisiting it this week that it isn't required to enter college or for her state scholarship. That surprised me. Regardless we are covering it. I would just intertwine it like I do everything. I just realized though that I don't have to cover enough for a credit if I don't want to, and wondered what others do. 

Edited by 2_girls_mommy
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