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Zuzi

US school to take international homeschoolers

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Hello from Slovakia!

Our eldest child is about to start fifth grade in September. In Slovakia, you can only homeschool grades 1-4, unless you enroll your child at a school abroad.

Can you recommend any good schools in the US that take international homeschoolers? Preferably ones that will not shipwreck an Eastern European family budget :).

Thanks!

Edited by Zuzi
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I don’t know about budget, but I believe Clonlara will work with international students, and will support a variety of homeschooling methods and choices.

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Welcome!

Here are two U.S. organizations that work with international homeschoolers:
   - Clonlara -- and here is their link to their international offices
   - Bridgeway

There are also several international homeschool options, but they require you to use the organization's materials and in essence, "do school at home". However, if you don't mind using pre-selected materials, some of these programs are free:
   - International Virtual Learning Academy
   - K-12 International Academy
   - International Connections Academy
   - Global Village School

And here is a past thread that is over 5 years old, but it provides some additional Christian U.S. homeschool ideas, plus one secular Canadian idea (the original poster was a Romanian homeschooler):
   - "Umbrella schools for international homeschoolers?"

Wishing you all the BEST in your homeschool journey! Warmest regards, Lori D.

Edited by Lori D.
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TTU K-12 (formerly TTUISD) is not Homeschooling. It is "Distance Learning".  They have courses for students from Kindergarten through 12th grade.  The courses are "online" and are Asynchronous. That might be another possibility for you.  Good luck!

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Hello!    I wish I could help you...I don't know anything about distance learning.   But I just wanted to comment because my husband and I going to get to visit Slovakia in June (in Kosice).   He has a business trip there and I will be coming with.   It will be our first time going overseas and I'm so excited.   It looks like a beautiful area.   

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12 hours ago, goldenecho said:

Hello!    I wish I could help you...I don't know anything about distance learning.   But I just wanted to comment because my husband and I going to get to visit Slovakia in June (in Kosice).   He has a business trip there and I will be coming with.   It will be our first time going overseas and I'm so excited.   It looks like a beautiful area.   

Hi goldenecho! That is great! :) We actually live way on the other side of the country, but we will be only 30 mins north of Kosice the last two weeks in June as well. Our son is going for a therapy retreat, as, so we are all going with him. Is your husband in the Steel industry? I know they have a huge steel factory over there. I hope you enjoy your time in Slovakia!

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Home Life Academy isn’t a distance learning program, but they may be able to help. They’re an umbrella school in Jackson TN, but have people using them all over. 

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20 hours ago, dmmetler said:

Home Life Academy isn’t a distance learning program, but they may be able to help. They’re an umbrella school in Jackson TN, but have people using them all over. 

Thanks dmmetler, this is actually exactly the institution we are most interested in. It was mentioned in one of the linked archived discussions. Having said that, they mention they are not accredited. This should probably not be an issue with us, as my kids will need to do exams locally and get transcripts from their local base school as well, but what does that really practically mean, if an institution is not accredited?

 

Edited by Zuzi
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In the US, pretty much nothing. If you transfer back during high school, schools will sometimes require exams for placement, but that’s only if you don’t test. 

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On 2/1/2019 at 3:02 AM, Zuzi said:

Hi goldenecho! That is great! 🙂 We actually live way on the other side of the country, but we will be only 30 mins north of Kosice the last two weeks in June as well. Our son is going for a therapy retreat, as, so we are all going with him. Is your husband in the Steel industry? I know they have a huge steel factory over there. I hope you enjoy your time in Slovakia!

My husband is a computer programmer for a company that makes turbines, so that might be related.   🙂   Any advice for someone visiting the country for the first time?  

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Typically not being accredited means that the school doesn't follow the 'normal/requested/required' curriculum and/or they don't require their students to take a standardized exam to confirm learning (you can do either or but not both in cases). Which is the reason accredited schools will require testing of unaccredited school transferees.

Edited by RenaInTexas
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On 2/2/2019 at 7:31 AM, Zuzi said:

...what does that really practically mean, if an institution is not accredited?


Agreeing with RenaInTexas about what "not accredited" means practically for families of elementary/middle/high school students. At the college level, it means that the credits earned (courses taken) will not transfer to another school, and will need to be taken again at the accredited school if the college student transfers.

More about accreditation:

If an institution is not accredited, it usually means that the institution has not applied to go through the accreditation process to see if the institution meets accreditation standards. Or, it might mean that the institution did go through the accreditation process, but failed to meet the standards.

To be accredited, a school must meet certain standards in things like: leadership, classroom management, physical facilities (actual buildings), "learning capacity", student supports, and kinds of resources used.

In most countries the government's ministry of education sets the standards and requirements of accreditation. In the U.S., accreditation requirements and standards are set by private non-profit accrediting organizations. In the U.S., there are 6 regional accrediting agencies that set the standards for quality for elementary schools, middle schools, and high schools, as well as several accreditation organizations for specific private schools -- Jewish or Christian schools, for example.

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On 2/2/2019 at 8:31 AM, Zuzi said:

Thanks dmmetler, this is actually exactly the institution we are most interested in. It was mentioned in one of the linked archived discussions. Having said that, they mention they are not accredited. This should probably not be an issue with us, as my kids will need to do exams locally and get transcripts from their local base school as well, but what does that really practically mean, if an institution is not accredited?

 

 

Where Home LIfe's main office is located (in the state of Tennessee), it means a few little things practically that weren't already mentioned. In TN, if a homeschooler uses a cover school that is not accredited then there is a different box to check to receive state paid college scholarships to state schools, and maybe something with high school sports teams (I'm still not sure how that works and the laws changed recently), and of course the transfer during high school years and placement tests which was already mentioned.  It's not been an issue for TN people to get jobs, and admitted to colleges etc.  At college level of course is where accreditation is the biggest concern, but that's not the topic.

If it would help to understand HLA better, I wanted to share a link to HomeLife's section about why they do not seek accreditation http://homelifeacademy.com/accreditation/

also, homelife has an international dept as well. From their site, look for the "enroll now" button and open up the info box on international.  Home Life does have some online class options for various needs. I'm not sure about all of those. But look under Archway info buttons on website.

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On 2/2/2019 at 8:41 PM, goldenecho said:

My husband is a computer programmer for a company that makes turbines, so that might be related.   🙂   Any advice for someone visiting the country for the first time?  

Hello goldenecho!

I've been asking a few NA friends who know Slovakia to see what they may find important to know for their countrymen. 🙂 

There are a few cultural differences, but not too many.

In Slovak, the use of imperative is more acceptable, so people may sound bossy, while they are just being direct and open. Don't take this personally, if they sound rude, as it may be completely acceptable to communicate that way in our language.

If you ask "How are you?" be prepared to hear the whole story sometimes. 😄 However, it is okay not to ask, it is not considered a greeting in Slovak. 

If you are gonna eat meals with other Slovaks, we say "Dobru chut!" (Bon apetit) before starting a meal together. Just plunging into your soup without saying it may look uncivilized.

Lunch is the dinner here, while suppers are light. So if you eat with other people, soup is just the starter and then a big meal comes right after that at lunchtime. However, in restaurants, you can always order a lighter meal or it is completely acceptable to skip the soup, even if the others have it.

In restaurants, "Menu" is the "Daily Special" and what is called "Menu" in the English language is called "A la carte".

In case anybody invites you to their home, it is generally considered polite to remove your shoes right past the front door. They would sometimes offer you visitor slippers. If not the case, they will ask you to keep your shoes on.

It is a custom (a rather silly one), to keep offering something to guests at least two or three times, as Slovaks tend to refuse every offer the first time to see if the one offering is serious. Be prepared to get the same thing offered to you three times, eg. a dessert, coffee. That's why the imperative is acceptable. My American missionary friend pointed out that sounding too polite in Slovak sometimes means that the hearer may think that you are not very serious. "Have some dessert!" may sound bossy to a North American, but it just means that this person really means that they want you to have it. I know, sometimes boggles my own mind :D. If you meet with people who have been to NA, they may be acquainted with your culture and it may be no issue.

There is quite a bit to see in the area, both history and nature-wise. The Kosiceans are very proud of their city. I mean very proud. However, some of my NA friends said that if you had some time to go travel, then Budapest, Vienna, Krakau and Prague are world class cities not too far really worth the visit.

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On 2/22/2019 at 3:50 AM, Zuzi said:

Hello goldenecho!

I've been asking a few NA friends who know Slovakia to see what they may find important to know for their countrymen. 🙂 

There are a few cultural differences, but not too many.

In Slovak, the use of imperative is more acceptable, so people may sound bossy, while they are just being direct and open. Don't take this personally, if they sound rude, as it may be completely acceptable to communicate that way in our language.

If you ask "How are you?" be prepared to hear the whole story sometimes. 😄 However, it is okay not to ask, it is not considered a greeting in Slovak. 

If you are gonna eat meals with other Slovaks, we say "Dobru chut!" (Bon apetit) before starting a meal together. Just plunging into your soup without saying it may look uncivilized.

Lunch is the dinner here, while suppers are light. So if you eat with other people, soup is just the starter and then a big meal comes right after that at lunchtime. However, in restaurants, you can always order a lighter meal or it is completely acceptable to skip the soup, even if the others have it.

In restaurants, "Menu" is the "Daily Special" and what is called "Menu" in the English language is called "A la carte".

In case anybody invites you to their home, it is generally considered polite to remove your shoes right past the front door. They would sometimes offer you visitor slippers. If not the case, they will ask you to keep your shoes on.

It is a custom (a rather silly one), to keep offering something to guests at least two or three times, as Slovaks tend to refuse every offer the first time to see if the one offering is serious. Be prepared to get the same thing offered to you three times, eg. a dessert, coffee. That's why the imperative is acceptable. My American missionary friend pointed out that sounding too polite in Slovak sometimes means that the hearer may think that you are not very serious. "Have some dessert!" may sound bossy to a North American, but it just means that this person really means that they want you to have it. I know, sometimes boggles my own mind :D. If you meet with people who have been to NA, they may be acquainted with your culture and it may be no issue.

There is quite a bit to see in the area, both history and nature-wise. The Kosiceans are very proud of their city. I mean very proud. However, some of my NA friends said that if you had some time to go travel, then Budapest, Vienna, Krakau and Prague are world class cities not too far really worth the visit.

 

Thank you SO MUCH for this!    This is gold!     So much good advice!

When I was researching flights I learned that it costs a lot lot less to fly out of Budapest, and it looks amazing, so we will probably go through there and spend a day at least if we can.    I'm so excited about all of it. 

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