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Is Guest Hollow enough for high school credit

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I stumbled across Guest Hollow in my searching for ideas for my next year 9th grader. He's my first high schooler so I'm a bit nervous at my ability. From the initial look of the History and Science it looks like something my son would enjoy. Is it enough for high school credit? My other option for Science that I was looking at is DIVE. My son loves History so reading books and watching documentaries is right up his alley. Thoughts appreciated. I really need to be budget friendly if possible.

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Having looked at it, my personal opinion is yes.

I'm a former high school history teacher. I haven't seen the US program, but I have a sense of what her programs look like from back when she did a lot of free stuff and you can see the book list. I think there's enough in there to call it a credit. That said, there are a LOT of books in there that are not meant to be the meat of a high school program. I mean, it uses multiple books intended for elementary and middle school audiences and relies on the Cartoon History, which is okay in terms of information, but isn't going to push a kid's reading level. I mean, it's got the Nathan Hale's Hazardous Tales books all over it. They have great information and are fun... but they're for upper elementary kids.

So, yes. Enough for a credit. The problem is that I'm not sure who it's right for exactly. It's a bit too much for most middle schoolers, but maybe right for an advanced middle schooler. But for high school, the materials would be great enrichment for a more immature or remedial student or a student who doesn't love history but wants a bit of fun in the course, but there's too much in there for most students who fit that profile. So... But all that is without having seen it. Maybe there are good primary source readings and writing or something to beef it up?

For the science... It also seems like enough sheer work to call it a credit. But it absolutely is not a regular science credit. So, not good for a STEM student, but in this case I get the audience completely. Seems perfect for a more humanities leaning student who likes to read and will delve in and think but doesn't need/want a standard track class. The bio seems closer. The kitchen chem and the physics are clearly very light on the science, but heavier on the ideas and reading.

Edited by Farrar
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WE are using the biology now (used Miller Levine the last time.). It uses a CK flex book-a standard high scholl bio text. It has added videis in the reading and lots of lab choices plus lots of extra documentaries and other books to add. I think it is comparable to Miller Levine in what is covered (except it leaves out human body, which I learned a lot of biology classes do.) I’ve been very happy with it. It’s much more enjoyable and engaging, too. 

I haven’t used the other sciences and think they look too conceptual for us. 

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1 hour ago, Farrar said:

Having looked at it, my personal opinion is yes.

I'm a former high school history teacher. I haven't seen the US program, but I have a sense of what her programs look like from back when she did a lot of free stuff and you can see the book list. I think there's enough in there to call it a credit. That said, there are a LOT of books in there that are not meant to be the meat of a high school program. I mean, it uses multiple books intended for elementary and middle school audiences and relies on the Cartoon History, which is okay in terms of information, but isn't going to push a kid's reading level. I mean, it's got the Nathan Hale's Hazardous Tales books all over it. They have great information and are fun... but they're for upper elementary kids.

So, yes. Enough for a credit. The problem is that I'm not sure who it's right for exactly. It's a bit too much for most middle schoolers, but maybe right for an advanced middle schooler. But for high school, the materials would be great enrichment for a more immature or remedial student or a student who doesn't love history but wants a bit of fun in the course, but there's too much in there for most students who fit that profile. So... But all that is without having seen it. Maybe there are good primary source readings and writing or something to beef it up?

For the science... It also seems like enough sheer work to call it a credit. But it absolutely is not a regular science credit. So, not good for a STEM student, but in this case I get the audience completely. Seems perfect for a more humanities leaning student who likes to read and will delve in and think but doesn't need/want a standard track class. The bio seems closer. The kitchen chem and the physics are clearly very light on the science, but heavier on the ideas and reading.

Wow! Thank you so much for taking the time to look at it and reply. I will keep that in mind as I process what I think I can do and he will enjoy.

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Chiming in here quickly. This is on the website:

Question: Aren't some of the books too easy for high schoolers?

Answer: The spine text A Patriot's History of the United States is a book that is used in some colleges. It is NOT a lower-level book. Using just the spine book, the scheduled videos, and the linked activities covers quite a bit of history. The scheduled books are "frosting on the cake" that help bring topics alive in a way that is engaging and memorable. I do schedule in quite a few graphic novels and some easier fare (amidst some more difficult titles written for adults), but my goal is to get students to not only learn history, but to RETAIN it and LOVE it. I do this using a mix of materials that even adults could learn from. Information is information. It doesn't have to by dry and difficult to get through in order to be valuable (in my opinion). When I was homeschooling, I always used what I believed to be the BEST vehicles for teaching information, no matter what the "level" of those materials. The feedback I've received about this program has been amazing. Students who used to think history was dry and boring have remarked how much they love it after using Guest Hollow's American History Year 1!

Question: Aren't some of the books too hard for high schoolers?

Answer: I combed AP U.S. History reading lists when researching books for this program. Most high schoolers should be able to handle the reading. There is plenty of "easier fare" to balance things out.

Let me know if you have any questions. My curricula isn't a fit for everyone, but the book list isn't 100% representative of the material covered. 😉 There are also tons of YouTube videos scheduled (including Crash Course, etc.). It's really a multi-approach program. You can always ask the parents who are using the program what they think (since I could be considered somewhat biased, lol): https://www.facebook.com/groups/1782356031831333/

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We used Guest Hollow biology, but only used the secular materials. The CK-12 online text is comparable to other high school biology texts and we really enjoyed a lot of the supplemental materials and experiments. I think it's an adequate high school biology class. As a PP noted, the other science classes seem to be more conceptual and I chose not to use them for high school.

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I bought the botany for my rising high-schooler.  It is definitely *enough* work for a credit of high school science; it is an unconventional credit, however.  I do not think that makes it better or worse than a conventional course, just different.  There are some things I would not do for a high schooler and call it science, such as the cooking and chocolate unit, and using Botany For Dummies as a spine.  But as you get further into it, it gets more high school-ish and rigorous.  I'd recommend it without hesitation for a non-sciencey kid.  For a science kid, I recommend swapping out the spine for something a bit more rigorous and conventionally science-like, cutting down on the artwork, and skipping the cooking and chocolate unit.

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On 1/22/2019 at 7:33 PM, freesia said:

WE are using the biology now (used Miller Levine the last time.). It uses a CK flex book-a standard high scholl bio text. It has added videis in the reading and lots of lab choices plus lots of extra documentaries and other books to add. I think it is comparable to Miller Levine in what is covered (except it leaves out human body, which I learned a lot of biology classes do.) I’ve been very happy with it. It’s much more enjoyable and engaging, too. 

I haven’t used the other sciences and think they look too conceptual for us. 

The CK12 doesn’t cover the human body?  Or the Guest Hollow schedule doesn’t cover the human body?

We used Ck12 two years ago and back then it most certainly covered the human body.  I remember clearly because that’s when taught my ds 14 the nitty gritty about exactly what it’s like to have a period.  Not just the medical/technical side, (the endometrial lining sheds...) but the reality of it (a cup of blood seeps out of you and there’s no way to stop it from seeping—sometimes it’s more of a gush).  It totally wigged my son out.  Not in a “girls are disgusting way” but in a “oh dear Lord, I can’t believe women go through that every month” way.  I told him about how he might go to swimming parties and girls might randomly say, “No, I don’t want to swim...” because they might have their periods, so he should just nod and move on and not hassle them.  I talked about how some women have pain every month, from mild to debilitating, and might end up cancelling plans at the last minute and be vague about why.  I talked about how there is often a fear that blood will leak onto their clothes, and if he ever sees that he should immediately tell her and if he has a jacket or something for her to wrap around her waist, to offer right away. Girls might end up taking a long time in the bathroom if they have to clean up on a heavy day and he should not comment about how long he waited for them to get done in the bathroom (I don’t think he would anyway, but I wanted him to know why girls sometimes take a while in the bathroom.). Stuff like that.  

So, while anatomy was in the CK12 books, I think (if I’m remembering correctly) Guest Hollow skipped anatomy and stopped using the Ck12 book before it got to anatomy.  I think I remember having to jiggle the Guest Hollow schedule around a bit to cover the additional anatomy chapters. 

————

We used the CK12 and the Illustrated Guide to Home Biology Experiments.  We did all the questions at the end of each section and the tests in the CK12 book. It took us a full 2 hours every day to get everything done.  I absolutely felt it was worth a full credit, even without any supplementals.  

Edited by Garga

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The Guest Hollow doesn’t use the anatomy parts. Where did you get the CK12 tests?  I’ve been making my own. 

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