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mlktwins

This 8th grader mom is reading the Motherload threads pinned at the top...

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...and trying to figure out AP/Honors/CLEP/transcripts/weighted vs. unweighted GPA's, etc. and I'm going :blink::ohmy::huh::unsure: (and where it that darn emoji that runs around like a crazy person)???  I'm wondering if I'm equipped enough to homeschool twin highschoolers if I can't understand the Motherload threads -- LOL!

 

 

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If it makes you feel any better, I've graduated two from homeschool high school and that motherload is too much for me to follow.  My oldest has graduated college.  When she was about grade 7 ish, this version of the forum wasn't around.  I used a simpler resource and learned stuff as I went along.  If I tried to  do that thread, I'd feel overwhelmed.  and that's from someone who has finished with 2 and only has a year left with youngest who is special ed track.

 

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I’ve been slowly working my way through depending on what I’m researching at the moment. Lately I’ve been looking into CLEP and GED. But definitely read all of the Nan in Mass posts for sanity.  

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ACK! The Motherlode threads are meant as a resource to go to for *specific topics* AS YOU NEED TO KNOW about that specific topic. Reading straight through all 3 "Motherlode" threads (2 high school, 1 college) is the fast track to brain explosion! 😵

During 8th grade, just focus on:
- figuring out what might work for you for general record keeping during high school
- getting a general overview understanding of the kinds of credits you'll need/want to plan for during the 4 years of high school
- starting to research curricula for the 5-7 courses you'll be planning for 9th grade (and if using the next level of whatever is working great for your family -- super! that will reduce your need to research curricula for fewer subjects 😉 )
- looking around at what your *local* opportunities and homeschool support might be for next year

Seriously -- take a look at ONLY the 8th grade part of the High School Time Table thread, and read ONLY SOME of the threads on page 1 of the High School Motherload #1" -- those threads about "fears about homeschooling high school", and "planning for high school." (Several of those really classic threads are by Nan in MASS, as Plum Crazy mentions above! 🙂 ) Most other topics can WAIT until later -- a little at a time, as needed. 🙂

I suggest stopping now, and don't even think about reading about CLEP or AP until your DC are DOING 10th grade. Don't worry about understanding and deciding on weighted/unweighted grades until finalizing transcripts to send to colleges at the start of 12th grade.

Homeschooling high school is like starting to homeschool anew. Just like when you started with a kinder or 1st grader, you focused on what topics were needed for that grade -- learning to read, phonics, foundational math. It would have been very unhelpful/unproductive to spend that time worrying about "what Algebra 1 program are we going to use in 8th grade", or "how will we do formal Logic years down the line?" Same principle here -- focus on the topics you need for getting started. Once you get a little ways down the path and have a routine/pace going, start looking ahead and researching the next few topics you'll need to know about that are coming up a little further down the path.

Remember, it's "eating that elephant" slowly -- one bite at a time over 4 years. You're trying to gulp the elephant whole before you even hit high school -- yikes! headed for indigestion for sure! 😂

Edited by Lori D.
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LOL -- I wasn't even reading the whole thing -- LOL!!!  I think I am also a bit stressed because we are still making a decision on which public schools to apply for and whether we will continue homeschooling.  I'm just not sure I can give them what the local school can give (IB - Honors/AP, Project Lead the Way).  I will figure it out, but just stressed right now.  Once a decision is made, which may be easy if they don't both get into the program that would most interest them (will find out in middle of February), then I can just pursue homeschooling and be set with the decision.  It scares me that I will be unable to put them into school later if they don't go into the system in 9th.  

I do love the Nan in MASS threads and I already had some of them saved in my handy Excel spreadsheet.  

I do have an idea for most of their 9th grade classes and have several options listed for outsourcing.

I think I am a bit worried about a lack of group projects and opportunities for collaboration if I homeschool and, from what I hear, colleges and jobs are looking for that.  I always hated group projects because I was one of the ones that wanted the good grade and did the work -- LOL.  I can see one of mine being very frustrated by that - he will not want a bad grade because someone doesn't carry their weight.

Anyway, thanks for the encouragement (again) and I do love your posts Lori D.!!!  I will look at just the ones I need for 9th grade!

 

 

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17 minutes ago, mlktwins said:

LOL -- I wasn't even reading the whole thing -- LOL!!!  I think I am also a bit stressed because we are still making a decision on which public schools to apply for and whether we will continue homeschooling.  I'm just not sure I can give them what the local school can give (IB - Honors/AP, Project Lead the Way)...


No, I think you can give your DC a much *better* high school experience than what the local school can give them because you have so many *more* resources to choose from, to support you, and to outsource with. Esp. since your DC *want* to homeschool and are motivated by self-education! But that's JMO. 😉
 

17 minutes ago, mlktwins said:

...It scares me that I will be unable to put them into school later if they don't go into the system in 9th...


On the 8th grade side of things, that does seem scary. But I really think that if you decide to homeschool high school, once you get into it, you'll find it exciting and interesting rather than scary. And again -- SOOOO MAAANNNNYYY resources to help you homeschool high school well! (:D
 

17 minutes ago, mlktwins said:

...I think I am a bit worried about a lack of group projects and opportunities for collaboration if I homeschool and, from what I hear, colleges and jobs are looking for that...


?? Not a requisite that I've ever seen for college admissions. They care about test scores and the transcript -- not curricula used or group projects. Don't worry about jobs wanting that -- your DC will get plenty of "group project" opportunities in college classes. Alas. That is about the worst learning tool ever. Collaboration is more useful, however, and esp. if DC go in to Engineering, most upper level courses will have plenty of opportunities for collaboration. So that is nothing to worry about, as it will happen naturally in college.
 

17 minutes ago, mlktwins said:

...I do have an idea for most of their 9th grade classes and have several options listed for outsourcing...


Yea! That's super -- to have your plan, plus a "plan B" in your back pocket. You're golden!

Wishing you all the best as you think through what's the best choice for your DC and your family for high school! Warmest regards, Lori D.

Edited by Lori D.
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1 hour ago, mlktwins said:

I think I am a bit worried about a lack of group projects and opportunities for collaboration if I homeschool and, from what I hear, colleges and jobs are looking for that.

 

 

 

 

We didn't "need" that for college admissions. No one asked on that.   And even though we did just labs and such at home, my daughter was the one in college classes who was ready for group work. She had the expectation that you were supposed to do your share of the work by golly gum drop.  And it seemed that some of the lab partners missed that while in brick and mortar schools.  Thinking back though?  Oldest was involved in youth group at church and volunteered for committees and group service projects.  Maybe that was enough to get her ready. (ps.  she graduated last year and did very well in college. )

and for jobs?  Well, that's what the college's role is in the big picture.

and guess what? my oldest never did any AP or dual enrollment. no co-op classes for academics. and yet was admitted to first choice college with scholarships based on ACT scores. She was triple STEM major.  No, it wasn't MIT.  But yes, it was proper accredited and her top choice.  and when she was going into grade 9, none of that was in our top thoughts.  I was too scared about teaching composition.  She got it figured out by college on that. I never did.

warm friendly thoughts and wishes for whichever paths you end up taking.

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1 hour ago, Lori D. said:


😉

Collaboration is more useful, however, and esp. if DC go in to Engineering, most upper level courses will have plenty of opportunities for collaboration. So that is nothing to worry about, as it will happen naturally in college.

 

 

sharing my oldest dd's experience on that. She was electrical engineering (and comp sci and math).  probably the biggest collaboration things involved getting to the annual professional meetings and getting entries in the student competitions.  

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Extracurriculars can provide great natural and organic opportunities for collaboration if that is something you feel your kids need exposure to, but as others said there are no real requirements in that area.

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Yikes. Those threads are simply information and most definitely not a guidebook with the correct answers!  I have been at this a very long time and I can share that my most successful high school experiences with my kids have been when I have ignored all outside voices and done exactly what we have wanted to do. 

On the WTM forums, most posts about high school promote following the traditional high school path at home. The formula is outsourced classes, AP exams, DE, etc. If that is the path a family wants to take, it is a good option. But, it is important to keep perspective and know that isn't the only one.

The most important goal should be to provide you kids a solid education. There are innumerable paths to that goal. Universities are open to non-traditional educations that are reflected in more "traditional" homeschooling (translated to mean not mini-traditional school replicas.)

Based on my kids' experiences at college in their honors programs surrounded by very high profile public school grads, ps's do not have sole ownership over providing solid foundational educations. My kids have entered knowing how to study, how to learn the information that might be missing in their understanding, how to write well, etc and do not expect a teacher to spoon-feed what needs to be learned and what needs to be studied.  They have watched some (not all) of their new friends really struggle with the lack of hand-holding (guidance of exact expectations). That is something that has never phased them bc our homeschool focuses on knowing how to learn, not on what you need to cram to get an A.

Collaboration experiences are not a college admissions prerequisite. Goodness. Attending a classroom is not a prerequisite.  My college sophomore never stepped inside of a classroom until last yr. She was one of 20 students who was awarded her U's top competitive OOS scholarship. Her application focused on internal motivation and learning bc she loves to learn. She did not have a list of ECs focused on leadership or group roles. Her ECs were are all very personalized and focused around her love of languages (like translating a Russian fairy tale into English for a summer project.) She was accepted to every school she applied to and was awarded scholarship $$ at every one. 

My point is that homeschooling can be uniquely your family's schooling preferences. There are more traveled paths that most people take and you can easily find a way to take that approach. But, it doesn't have to be "a specific" way as sifted out by finding "the answer" in those threads. The paperwork (transcript, school profile, counselor letter) can go a long way in presenting your homeschool philosophy and your students' background. U's want to know your student is going to thrive on their campus and contribute to their community. That is their goal and there is more than 1 way for kids to get there and you simply need to address it in the college app.

Edited by 8FillTheHeart
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21 hours ago, mlktwins said:

LOL -- I wasn't even reading the whole thing -- LOL!!!  I think I am also a bit stressed because we are still making a decision on which public schools to apply for and whether we will continue homeschooling.  I'm just not sure I can give them what the local school can give (IB - Honors/AP, Project Lead the Way).  I will figure it out, but just stressed right now.  Once a decision is made, which may be easy if they don't both get into the program that would most interest them (will find out in middle of February), then I can just pursue homeschooling and be set with the decision.  It scares me that I will be unable to put them into school later if they don't go into the system in 9th.  

I do love the Nan in MASS threads and I already had some of them saved in my handy Excel spreadsheet.  

I do have an idea for most of their 9th grade classes and have several options listed for outsourcing.

I think I am a bit worried about a lack of group projects and opportunities for collaboration if I homeschool and, from what I hear, colleges and jobs are looking for that.  I always hated group projects because I was one of the ones that wanted the good grade and did the work -- LOL.  I can see one of mine being very frustrated by that - he will not want a bad grade because someone doesn't carry their weight.

Anyway, thanks for the encouragement (again) and I do love your posts Lori D.!!!  I will look at just the ones I need for 9th grade!

 

Truly, high school is about doing the next thing, plus record-keeping. Knowing what "thing is next" is slightly more involved if you are trying to meet certain requirements (for example, if you are aiming for not just college prep but rigorous or elite college prep), but it's really not as scary as it seems, and you really can do this! And not only do it, but do it well. I only go into those pinned threads when I'm looking for specific information, and there are many I've probably never read! Pace yourself :-). You don't have to learn it all now--or even learn it all!

As for group projects and opportunities for collaboration, unless your kids are never around other people, they have probably already had these kinds of opportunities! (Have they ever done a team sport, figured out how to play a game in the back yard with other kids, been part of a youth group that did a service project or fundraiser, helped you clean up the kitchen, worked with a sibling on a household job, etc...) And even if not, they'll get plenty of that in college courses! Definitely not a reason to really wonder whether homeschooling will work out. 

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On 1/22/2019 at 2:25 PM, cbollin said:

If it makes you feel any better, I've graduated two from homeschool high school and that motherload is too much for me to follow.  My oldest has graduated college.  When she was about grade 7 ish, this version of the forum wasn't around.  I used a simpler resource and learned stuff as I went along.  If I tried to  do that thread, I'd feel overwhelmed.  and that's from someone who has finished with 2 and only has a year left with youngest who is special ed track.

 

This makes me feel better!   My daughter is also 8th grade and I spent days going through the motherload and felt so discouraged and stupid and doubting myself.  Finally, what I did was google my question with well trained mind.  Voila!  Exactly what I needed came up, usually multiple threads, so I read and marked and saved everything.  It was SO helpful.  But I still felt not being able to follow/understand/find what I wanted on the motherload was my own fault.   So, thank you.

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While I am not the OP,  I just want to thank everyone that has responded to her.   My daughter will be in 9th grade this summer (we school year round) and I am really worried I won't give her everything she needs.  I desperately want the best for her (as we all do for our kids) and want her education to wonderful.    I am putting so much pressure on myself and doubting myself and just generally making myself crazier than usual.   You guys have all been so supportive and kind and encouraging to the OP.  While your words were directed to her, I took them to heart as I read them.  It has been what I needed to hear.    Also, thanks to the advice given in old threads, I think I have her freshmen year of HS planned.  I am very grateful for this board (and all the well trained mind boards).

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On 1/22/2019 at 4:34 PM, mlktwins said:

LOL -- I wasn't even reading the whole thing -- LOL!!!  I think I am also a bit stressed because we are still making a decision on which public schools to apply for and whether we will continue homeschooling.  I'm just not sure I can give them what the local school can give (IB - Honors/AP, Project Lead the Way). 

 

1 hour ago, peacelovehomeschooling said:

 I am really worried I won't give her everything she needs.  I desperately want the best for her (as we all do for our kids) and want her education to wonderful.  

 

Can I just say that no two educations are the same. Stop comparing. What you do homeschooling high school will be better in some ways than what they could get anywhere else, and in other ways it won't measure up. It will be different and different is ok. Take it one step at a time, do your best, and be prepared to live with that.  It will be ok. From the mom of two college kids who both homeschooled high school, each quite differently even than their sibling, it will be ok and if you care enough to be this worried, you will do just fine.

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2 hours ago, Mom22ns said:

 

 

Can I just say that no two educations are the same. Stop comparing. What you do homeschooling high school will be better in some ways than what they could get anywhere else, and in other ways it won't measure up. It will be different and different is ok. Take it one step at a time, do your best, and be prepared to live with that.  It will be ok. From the mom of two college kids who both homeschooled high school, each quite differently even than their sibling, it will be ok and if you care enough to be this worried, you will do just fine.

Thank you more than I can say.    You don't know how much these words of wisdom and support mean to me.  I really appreciate it.

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