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DD is applying to an early college program, and I need to give her a standardized test for her application. We have to test anyway per our state law, so this isn't a big deal; we'll just kill two birds with one stone. I'm looking at the CAT, the Iowa Test of Basic Skills, and the Stanford since we can do any of those online and they all fulfill our state requirement. But I wondered if one of them is better than the others when it comes to the early college application. Do these tests have a "reputation" in the education world -- like, is one though to be easier than the others or whatever? I think they are all likely to be familiar to the people making admissions decisions, but I'm not sure. Would one of them be better accepted than the others?

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Does the early college program says what test results they would accept?

For example Calstate LA early entrance program

  1. Take a Qualifying Exam (ACT or SAT). Successful applicants will have at least a 22 English and a 23 Math score on the ACT, or a minimum score of 550 Evidence-Based Reading and Writing and 570 Math.  Interested applicants must submit qualifying test scores to the EEP office by May 1st of the application year. **Please report all qualifying scores to the university as well as directly to the EEP office. To report scores to the university please use code 4399 for the SAT and for the ACT use code 0320**” http://www.calstatela.edu/eep/application-process

U of Washington 

ACT Testing

Applicants need to take the ACT as part of their application to Transition School. The National ACT is offered on October 27, December 8, February 9; please note that you must register six weeks in advance of the test. Register either via mail or the ACT website (act.org). When asked for a school code for the Transition School, enter either 481174 (if asked for a 6-digit code) or 9899 (if asked for a 4-digit code).

If you are not able to arrange for the ACT in a timely way or if the national test dates are not possible for you, you may schedule an I-ACT test here on the University of Washington campus. The I-ACT, or Residual ACT, is only for students who are unable to schedule a National ACT exam. The I-ACT can only be used for the Transition School application, and no other application to college. Call the University of Washington Testing Office at 206-543-1171 to schedule a test date, or email: testingcenter@uw.edu. Be sure to identify yourself as a Robinson Center Transition School applicant. Tests are given at the testing center on campus at 1410 NE Campus Parkway, 440 Schmitz Hall.

This test helps us assess readiness for college-level work. We do not expect our applicants to prep extensively for the ACT; at most, read through the practice test and familiarize yourself with the format of the test. If the Transition School is the right educational fit for you, you should be able to take the exam without much preparation.

While not absolutely required, ACT Reading and Math scores in the 85th percentile or higher show potential readiness for college-level work.” https://robinsoncenter.uw.edu/programs/eep/transition/

 

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No. Apparently they use a third-party service provided by a local university to choose which students are admitted, so according to the principal, she doesn't even see test scores. Most students are applying from the district's regular middle schools, so they've all taken the same tests, but those aren't available to homeschoolers.

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I believe the ITBS is more rigorous than the CAT.  We use the CAT just to satisfy our county’s requirement (just to check the box).  I am giving them the ITBS this year (in a proctored setting) because I am hoping to get them into homeschool National Honor Society this year and they accept ITBS, but not done at home.

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The CAT that is available to homeschoolers is from 1970, with the norms also from that year. It’s considered the “easiest” of the various standardized tests by many, and it’s woefully outdated. I would avoid it.

Either of the others should be fine. I would consider using the NWEA MAP, which is adaptive and would therefore give the best picture of current level. It is available at www.affordabletests.com.

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10 hours ago, Jackie said:

The CAT that is available to homeschoolers is from 1970, with the norms also from that year. It’s considered the “easiest” of the various standardized tests by many, and it’s woefully outdated. I would avoid it.

Either of the others should be fine. I would consider using the NWEA MAP, which is adaptive and would therefore give the best picture of current level. It is available at www.affordabletests.com.

Yes, I had heard rumblings about the CAT but never really paid attention because we haven't used it. I took it in elementary school -- that was probably the same version that homeschoolers use now! I didn't realize it hadn't been updated. I haven't heard of the NWEA. I'll need to do some research to make sure it meets our state requirements before I decide. Thanks.

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