Menu
Jump to content

What's with the ads?

Æthelthryth the Texan

Updated: (Eliminated Saxon) Now Horizons or CLE for this situation?

Recommended Posts

Trying to figure out which math to start looking at as I’ll probably order soonish. I need a break from piecing math together, but I need structure to make sure it gets done. 

Ds7 (younger side of 7) knows his add, sub, multiplication and is learning division. He has a good start on fractions. We’ve used a huge mishmash of RS, MUS (he likes the videos of Mr Demme in particular when not wanting his Mom to teach that day), BA, and others to get here. I’ve read enough to know I don’t think I want to continue with RS. 

He picks things up super fast. I’d say he’s advanced, but not to the point of kids here who are doing 9th grade work  in 2nd grade. I’m thinking we need spiral review at this point to keep up with what he’s learned. I’m not looking to push him on to get him somewhere early. Definitely don’t want to burn him out. He picks up math fairly easily, but drawing and creating things are his passion and he’s not the kid who is ever going to go grab a math book to do on his own for fun. We do a lesson a day and move on. The faster he can get through it and go on his way, the happier he is. 

I need something that’s easy to accelerate. Right now I’m tired of piecing, which is why I just want to settle on a program for him for the next few months (we go year round). I am thinking Saxon or CLE. I’ve used both in the past with oldest. Saxon was a disaster with her, but she is a completely different kid than him. She left PS with lots of math anxiety. I went with Saxon because it’s what the school used, being an idiot and not realizing that was a poor choice if she was already struggling. The timed reviews and the format in general = tears daily, and the instruction didn’t make sense for her. She’s a MUS kid. He on the other hand loves to be timed on things. I had no complaints with CLE either and have used 500-Algebra 1 with oldest. I am more familiar with it than Saxon. I don’t remember much about Saxon as that was 5 years ago we used it. 

I know both have placement tests which is definitely needed. Which sounds like it could be the better fit for him? Saxon or CLE? 

*** And yes we have tried MM. I own all of it. The visual overwhelm was an issue for us both so we dropped it quickly. It’s not in the running for him at this time. 

Edited by Æthelthryth the Texan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have found Singapore Math easy to accelerate. You can first just skip the reviews in the textbooks when he grasps it quickly. And same for the reviews in the workbook if you feel very confident that he really has things down.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Honestly, he doesn't sound like a kid who is going to jibe with either of those programs, honestly. Saxon has so much review - he'll likely find it tedious. CLE likely wouldn't challenge him enough. I'm not sure which would be easiest to accelerate... probably Saxon?

Not MM... but have you considered other programs that tend to mesh better with mathy kids, like MEP or Singapore?

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hated Singapore when we tried it, but that was more for K/1ish. I can’t articulate why- it just never jived well at our house. I’ve done a little MEP with younger dd but never looked at it for him. I’ll add it to the list. 

Also, how the heck do I place him no matter what we pick,  if there isn’t a placement test? I feel like I’m doomed to keep piecing sometimes and I’m just tired right now. We have a lot going on with two family friends in crisis and I’m not burned out on homeschooling at all- I just don’t have the emotional energy to spare on planning at the moment. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't imagine Saxon working for what you want.

My 3rd grader sounds a lot like your 2nd grader.  She will be starting Horizons 5 in about 2 weeks.  I don't "accelerate" Horizons.  She simply does 4-5 pages/day b/c it takes her less than 30 mins or so to complete them and it is what she just plows through when she sits down..  Then we do a few HOE problems (your 2nd grader is too young, yet, for those) or a few problems from MiF.  (She only does those b/c I already own it.  I wouldn't buy it to use just for her.)

Horizons spirals and it definitely not overwhelming in the amt of work expected in a day.  (My ds who is the physics grad student skipped Horizons 2.)

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Singapore K/1st can feel too simple for some people. Really, it's easier to accelerate and will be meatier as it goes on. Plus, you could literally just have a kid that mathy maybe doing the Intensive Practice books - all harder problems. Or you could fly through the easier stuff and onto the other stuff. Math in Focus would be similar.

MEP is more spiral, but if you go there, use the scope and sequence to figure out how to jump around a bit.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Has he enjoyed any of it more than anything else? I'm big on following interests. 

I'd also not assume that he's not going to be a "math person." He might not be, but then he might be. Elementary math is very boring, but some sort of math and science might catch him at some point. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used Horizons with my older two and they were very different math students and it worked for them.  After 6 grade we switched to Saxon and they really both hated it.  I figured it was spiral and had a great reputation so it would be a good fit after Horizons.  I will not use Saxon again.  It is a great curriclum, but not for us.   My second oldests sounds like your son.  He does pick up on math concepts very quickly and he likes math.   It's a gateway to science for him. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My kids liked Abeka math best for their spiral, we did Singapore too as they were mathy.  😉  I feel pretty strongly about having a spiral math program in place for young children as self confidence was my main aim with early math.  I wanted to prevent forgetting skills. Horizons has many of the same pros as Abeka as I remember including colors on the pages,  my Dd (also artistic) could not stand doing her math all in black and white.  Abeka was easier to order so my choice was made.

A math teacher friend did Horizons and MUS together for elementary and felt pretty strongly about that combo!

FYI for placement.....with Abeka the first 60 pages was always review, so make sure you look further into the book if you decide to give Abeka a try.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Æthelthryth the Texan said:

I hated Singapore when we tried it, but that was more for K/1ish. I can’t articulate why- it just never jived well at our house. I’ve done a little MEP with younger dd but never looked at it for him. I’ll add it to the list. 

Also, how the heck do I place him no matter what we pick,  if there isn’t a placement test? I feel like I’m doomed to keep piecing sometimes and I’m just tired right now. We have a lot going on with two family friends in crisis and I’m not burned out on homeschooling at all- I just don’t have the emotional energy to spare on planning at the moment. 

We struggled with Singapore at the lower levels. It was so boring and tedious and not enough variety and had too heavy of mental math before the child was developmentally ready. BUT, I found as the child gets older and at the older levels, things go better. At least that is what others have told me. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Farrar said:

Honestly, he doesn't sound like a kid who is going to jibe with either of those programs, honestly. Saxon has so much review - he'll likely find it tedious. CLE likely wouldn't challenge him enough. I'm not sure which would be easiest to accelerate... probably Saxon?

Not MM... but have you considered other programs that tend to mesh better with mathy kids, like MEP or Singapore?

^^ This! I agree that he doesn't sound like a kid who will do well with either of those.

In my experience CLE is too drawn out for a kid who gets it easily and wants to move on, and I didn't think it was easy to accelerate. Saxon might be better but I still think it may be too long for a kid who wants to get it done so he can do art.

I was thinking the whole time that MUS sounded perfect for him, especially since he likes the videos. Why not continue with it since he already likes the videos? He can review as needed but move at his own pace as well. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Æthelthryth the Texan said:

he’s not the kid who is ever going to go grab a math book to do on his own for fun. We do a lesson a day and move on. The faster he can get through it and go on his way, the happier he is. 

 

CLE. 

People get worried about underserving kids that don't struggle with mathematics, and start piling on. I have such a kid, and I did such a thing 😑. But they're little people and they have their own ideas and they DON'T realize that we're all figuratively on the edge of our seats just waiting for some indication that they can't hang with the cool kids in the physics and engineering departments, whicj comes with a certain set of expectations as far as what kind of math they "have" to do.

CLE= get in, learn math, get out. The above gets-math kid I have here works at grade level in CLE (he was even back a grade for a good while because we tried ~literally everything else~) and he scores very high on standardized tests, for whatever that's worth. But he would, because he gets math. We take that as a sign that we need the BEST! thing, but I've come to the conclusion that it means nearly anything will be fine as long as it helps the teacher/child team move forward in math. [and in the case off the ADD brain-- keeps that team on the rails] CLE is something we can say, "do this and it's over so you can do what you want." 

I'd go so far as to say that other unpopular (due to a perceived lack of rigor) options, such as Learn Math Fast, serve kids like this very well, too.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, square_25 said:

Has he enjoyed any of it more than anything else? I'm big on following interests. 

I'd also not assume that he's not going to be a "math person." He might not be, but then he might be. Elementary math is very boring, but some sort of math and science might catch him at some point. 

He likes MUS. I will say that. But I mean, he blows through a worksheeet in about 90 seconds, so although the teaching on video makes him happy- he likes Steve Demme a lot, and I think he views it as cool because his 16 yo sister uses it- it’s hard because he doesn’t need 3 sheets of Mastery  ifykwim. And at a point, it gets expensive when you’re just using one or two worksheets per chapter. 

RS is what I credit with getting him as sound as he is. But he abhors any RS manipulative or game to this day, although I still sometimes pull from the teaching techniques- but he really just wants to know how to do it without all of the theory behind it. Like with borrowing or carrying for instance. He was just like “show me on the white board- please burn the abacus” sort of thing, so that’s what I’ve done. Well minus burning the abacus, LOL! 

Now, his little sister 💕’s BJU Math 1. Begs for it. And when he saw it,  he really, really wanted to do it too because the pictures are so cute and when we started her with it, he was still 6. He said “I want fun math like she has too!!” (They’re Irish twins and as far as they’re concerned they’re equal on school, although they really aren’t.)  I had ordered Level 1 and 2 at convention, thinking he could do level 2 if he wanted and if not I’d have it for her later, but it’s too low of a level I quickly realized and didn’t work for him other than too easy worksheet. I should’ve bought at least level 3, maybe 4. But he would love the color and the characters. But I didn’t spring for another level, not being able to lay hands on it and see if it’s worth it, as it’s pricey. 

I saw someone post a sample of Horizons here a few weeks or months back and I was intrigued. At the time I remarked I wished I had started him with that back after RS-B. I’m wondering if combining it as Mum2 mentions with MUS might give him the color he wants somedays, and the videos he wants others. I already have everything MUS except Zeta and Pre-Alg I think. 

And just to clarify - my meaning not a “math person”, I definitely didn’t mean he wouldn’t go STEM or something. Or be mathy. He is definitely much more gifted in it than myself or my daughters seems to be at this point. He just gets it, although sometimes I don’t get how he does it- I mean a lot of times for instance since he was 5, he has often been working off of (I don’t know if you would call it base?) 12, which he just figured out himself and sort of blew my mind. It wouldn’t surprise me in the least if he does lean toward engineering or something as he is intrigued by physics and chem type things already. I just meant he doesn’t sit and read his BA books for fun or beg to do math (or school or any sort), as I know some kids I read about on here do that, and ask for more and are in AoPS groups and what not at his age. He is NOT going to go grab a school book on his own at this point or ask for extra. That is definitely not my son at this time! His entire attitude surrounding school at this time is “when can I be done so I can go draw or create my latest Spiderman costume complete with invented accessories” sort of thing. His favorite type of school day is when I hand him a Mindware math workbook and send him off on the days we have appointments or something and school gets cut short. That’s why my mind had gone to CLE- when I first posted this. 

Edited by Æthelthryth the Texan
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does he like Beast Academy or no? Thats what I use with my daughter right now when I don’t have the energy to make up her lesson myself. 

My daughter is also very mathy but not begging for more math. She also doesn’t like manipulatives although she appreciates pictures to solidify a concept. So far, she’s been most inspired by “cool ideas” like negative numbers or binary. Those got her to do math on her own time.

What do you mean about base 12? 🙂

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just an idea,  my friend who used the MUS and Horizon combo let her two younger kids share a workbook I think.  The first ds did half the pages for each lesson and the second finished the workbook when he got to the level.  This just happened because the first didn’t want to do all the pages.  Her oldest needed all the pages as I remember so did them all.  This friend was my HE mentor and a friend from childhood, her kids are all older then mine so I used to go to her house and examine everything and the kids used to explain their work to me.  The youngest loved the colors in Horizons and the rods for MUS.  Btw,  The middle son is an engineer.

One of the best things about using two math curriculums was if one of the lessons in one curriculum doesn’t quite sink in properly I was able to switch to the other curriculum without my kids noticing.  They never felt like they couldn’t do math topic or that it was hard.  When the topic appeared again  in the other curriculum they always took off with a good understanding.  If they hadn’t taken off I had other inexpensive ways to do that topic again just waiting!  😂

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, square_25 said:

Does he like Beast Academy or no? Thats what I use with my daughter right now when I don’t have the energy to make up her lesson myself. 

My daughter is also very mathy but not begging for more math. She also doesn’t like manipulatives although she appreciates pictures to solidify a concept. So far, she’s been most inspired by “cool ideas” like negative numbers or binary. Those got her to do math on her own time.

What do you mean about base 12? 🙂

He likes BA in very measures doses. It’s one of those where I think he wants to like it more than he does if that makes sense.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Æthelthryth the Texan said:

He likes BA in very measures doses. It’s one of those where I think he wants to like it more than he does if that makes sense.  


Does he enjoy working through the puzzles or is that not his thing? We really only do the puzzles in that one, the ones that don't try to teach a concept. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If he can really work off base 12 (meaning 29 equals 33 and 2T equals 34) and taught that to himself at age 5, he has exceptional abstract math skills for his age. That is special.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, 8FillTheHeart said:

If he can really work off base 12 (meaning 29 equals 33 and 2T equals 34) and taught that to himself at age 5, he has exceptional abstract math skills for his age. That is special.

 

I'm curious if the OP meant different bases or modular arithmetic. Which is why I asked about it. I agree, if it's base 12, that's something special. 

ETA: Is T standing for the digit 10 here? And E for 11? I always see it with A, B, C, D, E, F, but maybe I mostly see it in the context of hexadecimal. 

Edited by square_25
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hope you've realized neither Saxon nor CLE.  🙂 They are what I use for my kids who need lots of review/spiral.

I didn't even know what Base 12 was, and I went through Calculus earning As the whole way.

Honestly, I would look towards Singapore and AOPS.  I would seriously consider meeting with a math teacher who has worked with highly gifted students for advice.  It sounds like your son is highly gifted in this arena.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I am using T for ten and E for eleven. Horizons teaches different bases in one of the upper elementary books. Some of my kids have loved it. But, they have not discovered it themselves at age 5!

I don't agree that BAor SM are the only right answers for gifted kids, though. But I completely agree that Saxon should be eliminated. (I have never seen CLE, so no comment there, but Saxon's incremental approach is too slow for gifted kids. My kids would have been driven crazy by Saxon.)

Playing with math, logic puzzles, strategy games, construction toys, etc are also good outlets for gifted math kids.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CLE is easy to accelerate as kids who need some spiral can do the first part of a lesson, skip the review for that lesson, then do the second lesson in its entirety. (Or, three new parts plus one review section.) Just in case you end up choosing CLE.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I don't know that I think it's the only answer, but I've liked the BA puzzles a lot, ever since I stopped using anything but their puzzles out of the books :D. 

My daughter loves binary (base 2) but she certainly didn't discover it herself! 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, 8FillTheHeart said:

If he can really work off base 12 (meaning 29 equals 33 and 2T equals 34) and taught that to himself at age 5, he has exceptional abstract math skills for his age. That is special.

 

2 hours ago, square_25 said:

 

I'm curious if the OP meant different bases or modular arithmetic. Which is why I asked about it. I agree, if it's base 12, that's something special. 

ETA: Is T standing for the digit 10 here? And E for 11? I always see it with A, B, C, D, E, F, but maybe I mostly see it in the context of hexadecimal. 

 

Oh man, I'm sorry, I probably explained it totally wrong, so that's why I put a ? after base- I wasn't sure if that was the right term. It's not apparently. He's not a genius or anything! 

 But like, he works off of 12's. When I was first teaching him addition say, back at age 4/5, he always would reform the numbers into 12's and then go from there adding on if that makes sense. I remember when he was little and I was teaching him to add doubles with RS. Say I showed him 8+8. Prior to memorizing the facts, he would look at it and say "okay, so that is 12+4, right?" and I would say yes, and then he would give me the answer. He knew how to regroup to make it say 10+6, and he could do that, but he much preferred to do it to make 12's and group from that. He just always wanted to do it that way, and since he was getting the correct answers I just let him. I don't know if that was right or wrong or if it'll make it harder for him in the long run?.........Same with multiplication and now learning division- he wants to move/use from the 12's when at all possible. He says it makes more sense and is easier in his head.

But he doesn't write an extra digit or anything, so I think I was off base, LOL, to describe it as base. That's my ignorance on math there. He just works off of 12's instead of 10's when he can. He's doing it almost all in his head- so I described it incorrectly now reading what Base 12 is with symbols,  in that he's definitely not working off of base 12 with a different symbol standing in. He just rather groups by 12s instead of 10's if that makes sense? But I'm not sure what you call that. I guess just different. 🙂He is really strong on mental math and doesn't really have to show any work typically at this stage. He just writes the answer, but he is writing a normal answer, not  29 for 33 or something as described by y'all on the true base 12. 

Sorry for the confusion. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's actually not so far from base 12! Does he group into multiple 12s? Like, is that how he'd do 37 + 21 or something like that? 

12s are very nice in division, so I sympathize there :D. They divide evenly into so many things! 

I generally encourage letting kids do things in ways that make sense to them as much as possible :-). For instance, my daughter's favorite trick is "switching around units digits." She'll do 15 + 9 by saying "Ah-ha, that's 19 + 5" and then goes from there. Mind you, I think she knows 9 + 5 quickly, so I'm not sure how it really helps her, but she still loves it. I remind her that she doesn't need to do once in a while that but certainly don't stop her! 

Edited by square_25
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, if he just wants "get her done" math, I'd use Horizons.  But I'd do supplementing with MEP or Beast Academy and math puzzles and games (Zaccarro and the like).  He's going to need small amounts of "hard stuff," but for the days you just want to hand him something to practice skills, I think Horizons would be the best bet.  But I'd use the placement test.  CLE might work all right, but I think it would be tedious for such a mathy kid.  Absolutely not Saxon, because he'd have to copy out problems and such, and he's asynchronous there.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, square_25 said:

That's actually not so far from base 12! Does he group into multiple 12s? Like, is that how he'd do 37 + 21 or something like that? 

12s are very nice in division, so I sympathize there :D. They divide evenly into so many things! 

I generally encourage letting kids do things in ways that make sense to them as much as possible :-). For instance, my daughter's favorite trick is "switching around units digits." She'll do 15 + 9 by saying "Ah-ha, that's 19 + 5" and then goes from there. Mind you, I think she knows 9 + 5 quickly, so I'm not sure how it really helps her, but she still loves it. I remind her that she doesn't need to do once in a while that but certainly don't stop her! 

 I asked him today, because honestly I haven't asked him in a while. He said he uses 12's sometimes but not all the time. I asked him the problem you gave and he just gave me the answer and looked at me like I was crazy when I asked him if he grouped into 12's, LOL. He said "I just knooooow it Mom." He saw me looking at the Horizons sample and said he wants to do that math instead of MUS, and I laughed because he has no clue. I think he just thinks any other math might be less work like his sister's is to him. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Æthelthryth the Texan said:

 I asked him today, because honestly I haven't asked him in a while. He said he uses 12's sometimes but not all the time. I asked him the problem you gave and he just gave me the answer and looked at me like I was crazy when I asked him if he grouped into 12's, LOL. He said "I just knooooow it Mom." He saw me looking at the Horizons sample and said he wants to do that math instead of MUS, and I laughed because he has no clue. I think he just thinks any other math might be less work like his sister's is to him. 


I'd guess he did that one by 10s, then, since it's so quick with 10s and 1s! 

From what I've seen of MUS, it'd be quite boring for a mathy kid. My daughter perks up the most if I teach her new ideas. Like, I've taught her binary and she really loved that and actually became willing to practice addition as part of the process. Generally, she loathes any problem which is pure calculation. But she does like the puzzlier problems in BA, so maybe she's easier to please than your son :-). 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, square_25 said:


I'd guess he did that one by 10s, then, since it's so quick with 10s and 1s! 

From what I've seen of MUS, it'd be quite boring for a mathy kid. My daughter perks up the most if I teach her new ideas. Like, I've taught her binary and she really loved that and actually became willing to practice addition as part of the process. Generally, she loathes any problem which is pure calculation. But she does like the puzzlier problems in BA, so maybe she's easier to please than your son :-). 

I think he likes MUS because it was so different from what we had been doing with RS and for a time MM. We don't do MUS everyday for sure though. But I've found that when there is a new concept, sometimes it was easier just to sit with him and show him a MUS video and then work through a few worksheets. The layout of the MUS worksheets works really well for him too I'll say. There is a lot of white space I guess you would call it, so it's not visually overwhelming.

When you mentioned negative numbers upthread, I meant to mention too that he is intrigued with negative numbers. He is honestly really random to me with math- one day something came up with my oldest with negative numbers and he wanted to know how they worked, so I showed him. We haven't done anything complicated- just beginning the concept, but he does seem to grasp things on an abstract level really quickly. And not just math. He's like this with everything except reading and writing, which have been slower to come along........ It's interesting and often exhausting because he never shuts up. Which is why I just want a math program I can use in a linear fashion with him. 🙂 My oldest is struggling with Algebra 2 on top of everything else and I'm just sort of exhausted on a mental front at the moment. I know on the Accelerated board when I've asked everyone is so great about piecing together and doing this and that and I've been doing that for some time but right now I'm just tired. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For my boy who was very quick in math concepts, I kept a "boring" math that got done most every day (I'm not a math natural, and I wanted to make sure we covered all the expected topics in a way that built) and I let him do MEP on the side and play around on Khan Academy at his own whim as well. He really loved the puzzle aspect of MEP (Year 2 sounds like a good fit for your guy--use the teacher's notes too, there are problems in there as well as the student workbooks).

His daily math was Singapore, until 4th grade, then we switched to R&S for 4th - 6th.  I had multiple crazy things (one kid with chronic illness, then a difficult pregnancy and NICU baby,) going on when he was around those ages, so *I* needed easy and consistent to teach.  We still let him loose on Khan and let him dip his toes into Alcumus for fun.  He went to Dolciani Pre A in jr. high and was fine. So, using a less than AOPS type set up didn't hurt my math natural--he still got a good base, but  also some mental stretching in a way that *I* could also handle.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've sifted through samples and now I'm at deciding between CLE and Horizons!  Forgive me as I talk through this. 🙂

I think he would do well in either. I love the look and the S&S I'm seeing in Horizon. I think he would be challenged in a good way, and I think he would like the color and the variety. On the assessment he placed in Horizons 3, as he didn't know the ratios and has never done anything near the fractions work in the problems for level 4 assessment.

I wish the online samples were more extensive online though, as I don't know if we need both books for 3, or just book 2. The samples I can see for book 1 seem way too easy, but I have a feeling Horizons can be deceptive that way and maybe 5 lessons later it's a lot more difficult so start with book 3 by default? Also, if I go with Horizons, do I need the Teacher's Guide? I was reading some reviews on here and seemed like a lot of feedback said the TG wasn't very helpful, but I do like a script or some guidance, although I don't need the overkill level of what BJU provides for example. Is the TG a good investment? 

I also like a lot about CLE. And I know CLE math structure well,  so I wouldn't have a learning curve to teach it.  The white space and lay out  is good for him. And I think the unit booklets would appeal to his "let's just get this done and move on" personality. I know we can accelerate it as I've done that before when trying to fill gaps with my oldest- it's pretty easy to skip to what you need if you want. Also, after looking at all of these samples of various programs I feel like Horizons and CLE are both ahead of many of the other math programs out there, which is a plus in his case- at least at this point in time. I haven't had him do the CLE placement yet. I figured one was enough for a day with the Horizons plus school work. 

Argh. Picking new stuff is so fun sometimes, but angst inducing too! The CLE samples on the Light Units are pretty generous. Maybe I should just buy a single book of Horizons 3 and print off a couple of the CLE Light Unit samples that are at or below his level for him to try, or just order a single unit and let him see which he prefers? Is that nuts to let a 7 year old chose between the two?

It seems like I can't really go wrong with either at this point. And I'm not selling off any of the stuff I have until youngest is well past this point (which will be a while), so if he wants to do MUS again some days, or needs more explanation, we still have that in the cabinet to change it up (among other things). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Æthelthryth the Texan said:

I think he likes MUS because it was so different from what we had been doing with RS and for a time MM. We don't do MUS everyday for sure though. But I've found that when there is a new concept, sometimes it was easier just to sit with him and show him a MUS video and then work through a few worksheets. The layout of the MUS worksheets works really well for him too I'll say. There is a lot of white space I guess you would call it, so it's not visually overwhelming.

When you mentioned negative numbers upthread, I meant to mention too that he is intrigued with negative numbers. He is honestly really random to me with math- one day something came up with my oldest with negative numbers and he wanted to know how they worked, so I showed him. We haven't done anything complicated- just beginning the concept, but he does seem to grasp things on an abstract level really quickly. And not just math. He's like this with everything except reading and writing, which have been slower to come along........ It's interesting and often exhausting because he never shuts up. Which is why I just want a math program I can use in a linear fashion with him. 🙂 My oldest is struggling with Algebra 2 on top of everything else and I'm just sort of exhausted on a mental front at the moment. I know on the Accelerated board when I've asked everyone is so great about piecing together and doing this and that and I've been doing that for some time but right now I'm just tired. 

 

He seems like a very bright kid. This might be kind of unhelpful, but the thing I'd worry about most with a mathy kid is less that he's going to be missing something essential and more that he just gets turned off from math because it seems boring and easy. 

On the other hand, it sounds like you do need something linear and easy to deal with. It's too bad he isn't so into puzzles, because I'd almost feel like the best thing to do would be to let him loose on a bunch of fun puzzles and not worry about "content" so much. But that sounds like it wouldn't be a good fit, right? 

Taking a look at Horizons and CLE, they both seem like solid curriculums, so I'm sure they'd be just fine :-). Just throwing my two cents in. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, square_25 said:

 

He seems like a very bright kid. This might be kind of unhelpful, but the thing I'd worry about most with a mathy kid is less that he's going to be missing something essential and more that he just gets turned off from math because it seems boring and easy. 

On the other hand, it sounds like you do need something linear and easy to deal with. It's too bad he isn't so into puzzles, because I'd almost feel like the best thing to do would be to let him loose on a bunch of fun puzzles and not worry about "content" so much. But that sounds like it wouldn't be a good fit, right? 

Taking a look at Horizons and CLE, they both seem like solid curriculums, so I'm sure they'd be just fine :-). Just throwing my two cents in. 

He likes some puzzles sometimes- and he does like the Mindware books, but I think just because they’re easy as much as anything.  I’d say in general at the moment he just wants his problem set and to move on. I also do want him to have a traditional program and not think he gets out of something his sister does because he’s strong in math, and here’s why- he constantly has people telling him how smart he is and I’m trying to keep his ego in check, for better or worse. I’d rather just bump the difficulty. I also don’t have the math confidence you and some others have to know I’m checking the right things without some form to follow iykwim. It’s been a way humbling experience with my oldest so I need structure. 🙂 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Æthelthryth the Texan said:

He likes some puzzles sometimes- and he does like the Mindware books, but I think just because they’re easy as much as anything.  I’d say in general at the moment he just wants his problem set and to move on. I also do want him to have a traditional program and not think he gets out of something his sister does because he’s strong in math, and here’s why- he constantly has people telling him how smart he is and I’m trying to keep his ego in check, for better or worse. I’d rather just bump the difficulty. I also don’t have the math confidence you and some others have to know I’m checking the right things without some form to follow iykwim. It’s been a way humbling experience with my oldest so I need structure. 🙂 

 

Yeah, it totally makes sense :-). Math is my thing, so this is easy for me: I can follow interests without trouble, and I don't think that's true for most people. I really do like the look of both the programs you're mentioning for what you want! 

Something fun we've been doing recently is going over old Math Kangaroos: have you ever seen those? 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, square_25 said:

 

Yeah, it totally makes sense :-). Math is my thing, so this is easy for me: I can follow interests without trouble, and I don't think that's true for most people. I really do like the look of both the programs you're mentioning for what you want! 

Something fun we've been doing recently is going over old Math Kangaroos: have you ever seen those? 

I haven’t. I’ll Google and check it out!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you go with Horizons, I'd buy both level 3 books. I'd just hand him the first book om days when you are tired & just want him to get things done. I'd work through the Book 2 with him. I can't speak to the teacher materials as I never used them (I used a few Horizons math books to go back through concepts that my kid needed more practice with.)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, square_25 said:

 

Yeah, it totally makes sense :-). Math is my thing, so this is easy for me: I can follow interests without trouble, and I don't think that's true for most people. I really do like the look of both the programs you're mentioning for what you want! 

Something fun we've been doing recently is going over old Math Kangaroos: have you ever seen those? 

Just an FYI,  the UK has something similar to Math Kangaroo called Primary Maths Challenge with lots of past papers.  My kids loved it!  http://www.primarymathschallenge.org.uk/

We always did a couple of word problems that weren’t necessarily our curriculum each day. We used the Singapore Challenging Word Problems but a year or two behind where they were in the books.  The free test papers would accomplish the same thing.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, mumto2 said:

Just an FYI,  the UK has something similar to Math Kangaroo called Primary Maths Challenge with lots of past papers.  My kids loved it!  http://www.primarymathschallenge.org.uk/

We always did a couple of word problems that weren’t necessarily our curriculum each day. We used the Singapore Challenging Word Problems but a year or two behind where they were in the books.  The free test papers would accomplish the same thing.

 

I'll take a look! Thank you :-). 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...