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MFW High School and not completing all 4 years...


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I was wondering if anyone had feedback on MFW (My Father's World) for a student that may not be able to complete all 4 years. We intend to do dual enrollment and very possibly a trade school and from looking at MFW, it seems like you would need to do all 4 years to get all the required high school credits. Anyone have thoughts on that? Thanks!

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Welcome to the WTM forums! I see by your post count you are new. 🙂 

No need to feel locked in to doing one publisher's curricula for all 4 years of high school. While it is a good idea to complete a set of "college prep" credits in high school to help keep open as many future doors as possible, there is no problem with "mixing-and-matching" (using multiple curricula publishers or course providers to do so) -- i.e., completing some credits from one curricula (such as MFW), and other credits using other program publishers, and still other credits through online course providers or dual enrollment (DE) at your local community college or university.

Most homeschool high school programs are designed to take 1 year (= 1.0 credit) or 1 semester (= 0.5 credit). If you don't complete the program as written, you can always count it as a partial credit, or use other resources to complete the credit. In other words, no worries about NOT completing all *4* years of MTF, or even completing all of *1* year of MFW.

Side note: the MFW curricula itself only covers credits in English, Social Studies (History, Econ, & Gov't), and Bible (an Elective). The rest of the credits are covered through programs from other publishers which can be purchased through MFW and are included in MFW's schedules. And a few of those programs are quite weak or incomplete -- Rosetta Stone, is the main one I'm thinking of -- so you may already wish to be looking beyond just MFW for fulfilling some of the high school credits.

In case it helps, below is a list of college prep credits that blends together the credits typically required for high school *graduation* + credits typically required for *admission* to the majority of non-selective/competitive non-top tier colleges. (Note that this is very similar to the high school sequence of credits listed by MFW)

4 credits = English (typically 1/2 Lit. + 1/2 writing -- other options also accepted)
3-4 credits = Math (Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2; + many colleges want a 4th math above Algebra 2)
3-4 credits = Science, with labs (a few colleges want Biology and/or Chemistry, but most are flexible)
3-4 credits = Social Studies (most colleges want 1 credit = Amer. Hist.; some also want 1 credit = World Hist/Geog, and/or 0.5 credit each Gov't & Econ)
2-4 credits = Foreign Language (same language; many colleges accept ASL)
1 credit = Fine Arts
4-8+ credits = Electives (Computer, Health, PE, Bible/Religious Studies, Vocational-Tech, credits in personal interest areas, additional credits in Fine Arts, "Academic Electives" = additional credits in above 5 subject areas beyond the requirements, etc.)
22-24+ credits = total

That comes out to roughly 5-7 credits per year of high school, with 1 credit very roughly equaling about 1 hour of work per day, 4-5x/week, for the 36-week school year.  HOW you earn these credits (i.e., what resources you use), is totally up to you -- what curricula (or online courses) work best for your student and for your teaching style/needs, and what local options (such as DE) are available to you. 🙂

Doing dual enrollment (DE) courses usually increases the total amount of credits completed during high school, as typically a 1-semester college course is counted as a 1-year (1.0 credit) high school course. Due to the higher rigor and faster speed, high school students doing a lot of dual enrollment usually take fewer overall courses per semester (3-4 college courses vs. 5-7 high school courses), but even 3 DE courses per semester still yields a total of 6 credits by the end of the year, so no worries about not getting all of your high school credits done if you decide to do DE. 🙂

In case it helps, check out the pinned thread at the top of this board: "High School Motherlode #1" and "High School Motherlode #2". Both are a wealth of links to past threads on topics such as planning for high school and how to choose curricula (page 1 of Motherlode #1), and about dual enrollment (page 5 of Motherlode #2).

BEST of luck as you plan for high school! Warmest regards, Lori D.

Edited by Lori D.
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5 minutes ago, MerryAtHope said:

Welcome! Have you created a four-year plan? See some of the pinned threads at the top for info on how to do that, like this one. Once you have a plan, then you can decide how MFW, dual credit courses, and other courses meet her needs.


Good idea! 🙂 These are some other good past threads (in post #1 of the Highschool Motherlode #1 pinned thread) on how to make a high school plan:
Looking forward toward high school (time line, planning credits, how to make a plan, picking curriculum)
When formulating a high school plan (what factors to consider?)
To parents of freshmen, sophomores next year (4 types of college admissions; why you have to plan ahead in high school)

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5 hours ago, MLINAZ said:

I was wondering if anyone had feedback on MFW (My Father's World) for a student that may not be able to complete all 4 years. We intend to do dual enrollment and very possibly a trade school and from looking at MFW, it seems like you would need to do all 4 years to get all the required high school credits. Anyone have thoughts on that? Thanks!

I don't know what homeschool laws you might fall under. In my state, I get to award credits based on whatever I deem appropriate. My student did the first two years of MFW for high school and absolutely loved it, they were his favorite two years. We switched to something a bit more eclectic for the last two years, and he still wishes that he would have done all four years. So there were four years total of high school, and he had four years' worth of credit.

If you were doing dual enrollment, those would count also as high school credit.

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Hi ladies - thanks for your answers; I had some forum hiccups that I needed help with before I could post again. 🙂 I participated on this board years ago and have recently come back because....high school!!!! (I don't remember my old name, sorry!)

After I posted this I started talking to my husband and ended up in tears because I was "planning too far in advance". (9th grade in the fall.) His words, not mine, lol. I did dig into our state (Arizona) guidelines and was surprised to find that, like This is the Day stated, I award the credits I want. Huh! So that takes some of the pressure off. I'm looking at some of the local schools (ASU, Grand Canyon, don't even know where else) to see what their requirements are and I guess I don't need to stress about that. 

So thank you for some direction, so many links here it is overwhelming! I have a nice cuppa coffee as I peruse everything....LoriD, you are amazing!!!!

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23 hours ago, MLINAZ said:

... I'm looking at some of the local schools (ASU, Grand Canyon, don't even know where else) to see what their requirements are and I guess I don't need to stress about that...


Good news! You're in good shape for staying in-state to go to college.

While AZ does not have a ton of 4-year schools, the 3 public state universities are not difficult to get into (acceptance rate, admission requirements), and each offers different solid, quality degree programs. There is only one fairly sizable private non-profit university (GCU) is much smaller than the state universities, but it has some very new campus facilities, offers some decent programs and has a lot of scholarship money to give out.

UA, NAU, and GCU are all homeschool student friendly, and require no additional "hoop-jumping". ASU does require extra paperwork from homeschoolers in one area -- ASU requires homeschool students to require proof of science labs using laboratory equipment. This entails filling out ASU's homeschool science lab forms, and making sure that you list materials used for science labs by formal names (i.e. "flasks and graduated cylinders" rather than "containers and measuring cups/spoons"). See this past thread about dealing with this concern: "ASU only accepts 'live labs' on high school transcript? Advice?"

All 4 of the schools accept a lot of Community College credits through transfer agreements with the 2 major community college systems (Maricopa Community Colleges in Phoenix area and environs, and Pima Community College in Tucson). Both community college systems have programs for high school students that offer free tuition for vocational-tech courses. And both community college systems, as well as GCU, offer numerous dual enrollment (DE) courses to high school students.

Below are the stats for admission purposes for the 4 AZ universities. BEST of luck as you think and plan for high school and beyond! Warmest regards, Lori D.
 

The major universities in AZ
ASU (Arizona State University, Phoenix) -- public; 42,000 students on campus
UA (University of Arizona, Tucson) -- public; 35,000 students on campus
NAU (Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff) -- public; 27,000 students on campus
GCU (Grand Canyon University, Phoenix) -- private non-profit; 16,000 students on campus (60,000+ online students)

Acceptance Rates:
ASU = 84% -- out of every 100 applicants, 84 are accepted
UA = 76% -- out of every 100 applicants, 76 are accepted
NAU = 80% -- out of every 100 applicants, 80 are accepted
GCU = 43% -- out of every 100 applicants, 43 are accepted (for attending at the campus)

ACT scores for admission
ASU -- 21 min. required  /  26 = avg.  /  29 = top 25%  (only 20% score 30 or higher = high odds of merit aid/scholarships)
UA    -- 21 min. required  /  25 = avg.  /  28 = top 25%  (only 15% score 30 or higher = high odds of merit aid/scholarships)
NAU -- 20 min. required  /  23 = avg.  /  25 = top 25%  (only 4% score 30 or higher = high odds of merit aid/scholarships)
GCU -- 19 min. required

SAT scores for admission
ASU --  1080 min. required  /  1240 = avg  /  1340 = top 25%  (only 14-18% score 1400-1600 = high odds of merit aid/scholarships)
UA    -- 1080 min. required  /  1210 = avg  /  1310 = top 25%  (only 10-12% score 1400-1600 = high odds of merit aid/scholarships)
NAU -- 1030 min. required  /  1130 = avg  /  1230 = top 25%  (only 4% score 1400-1600 = high odds of merit aid/scholarships)
GCU -- 1010 minimum required (with a minimum 2.50 GPA)

GPA of incoming freshman
ASU --  3.54 = average  /   3.75+ = 34%  (of all incoming freshmen, about 1/3 have a high GPA)
UA    -- 3.30 = average  /  3.75+ = 22%  (of all incoming freshmen, about 1/5 have a high GPA)
NAU -- 3.57 = average  /   3.75+ = 39%  (of all incoming freshmen, about 1/3 have a high GPA)
GCU -- 3.35 = average

required credits for admission for all 4 schools
4 credits = English
4 credits = Math  (Alg. 1, Geom, Alg. 2, Advanced Math = above Alg. 2)
3 credits = Natural Science, with labs  (at least 1 credit required to be from choice of Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Earth Science)
2 credits = Social Science  (at least 1 credit required to be Amer. History)
2 credits = Foreign Language*  (of same language; ASL accepted)
1 credit = Fine Arts or CTE**

* = GCU only requires 1 credit
** = only required by UA -- NAU, ASU, GCU do not require any

Edited by Lori D.
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On 1/13/2019 at 2:58 PM, MLINAZ said:

I was wondering if anyone had feedback on MFW (My Father's World) for a student that may not be able to complete all 4 years. We intend to do dual enrollment and very possibly a trade school and from looking at MFW, it seems like you would need to do all 4 years to get all the required high school credits. Anyone have thoughts on that? Thanks!

 

wanted to share some experiences if it would help encourage.

Not disagreeing with others about credits.  Just stating some of this in a slightly different way with some personal stories.  Yes,  MFW offers 4 years of high school. Plenty of credits that are distributed with college entrance in mind. But if you don't do all of their material, life turns out fine in the end as long as you are getting the credits you want from somewhere.  You plan to have mix and match approach with DE and trade schools, etc.  That's totally ok.  In fact, I've known people who worked for MFW who did not do all 4 years of mfw high school. In some cases not all 4  years had been written yet. So they had to get high school courses from other places.  But that was years ago and those students are long out of college so getting credits in other ways was not an issue.  Other people I've known who worked there after the program was finished still did dual enrollment, co-ops, and not all mfw to get their personal plans for high school graduation done.  so if it worked for them, you're good too.  I've known some customers who only did grades 9 and 10 and then do full time dual enrollment to get associates degree while getting high school done. just agreeing with ThisistheDay that if you do outside courses that counts on high school too.  There are many correct paths to homeschooling. just remember: when you make your 4 year plan, use pencil because it will change.

Then, there's mfw customers like me.  I'm the oddball who did all 4 years of mfw high school with two children. Oldest did great in college (3 STEM degrees in 4 years.) That means whatever materials that are perceived as weak or incomplete didn't matter in the long run. all that stressing was for nothing. My kid that struggled in writing got to college  and got As in composition. She was very well prepared for sciences and math. and the colleges we applied to did not care about the rosetta stone thing at all.  maybe colleges in your state do. in which case, use something else for foreign language to be safe. I hear lots of bad stories that it matters even though I did not experience it personally.   Even in the mfw 4 year plan they still recommend college class for some of the foreign language credit.  We personally stopped after 2 years in foreign languages. meh. it's all good.  Middle gal is doing her best as well even though it looks different (college degree through Clep exams and a few online classes).She's not her sister.  and of course youngest is special ed and MFW doesn't offer that.  I sometimes feel like the very oddball homeschooler who did use only 1 curriculum provider to get 'er done for two of my children. very little we did that wasn't mfw.  very oddball case in homeschool is my family. not the norm at all. And that's my point for chiming in.

Be encouraged that  you don't have to do all 4 years of any one specific provider. But if you for some reason end up like me, using one provider for my super genius daughter and average daughter, just know it can work out ok too. 

since you were looking at mfw high school stuff, I wanted to make sure you see this part of their website with a planning guide for some little things to do along the way of homeschool high school. I found it helpful over the years to see some of that.   https://www.mfwbooks.com/wps/portal/c/HSPlanningGuide

 

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10 hours ago, MLINAZ said:

Hi ladies - thanks for your answers; I had some forum hiccups that I needed help with before I could post again. 🙂 I participated on this board years ago and have recently come back because....high school!!!! (I don't remember my old name, sorry!)

After I posted this I started talking to my husband and ended up in tears because I was "planning too far in advance". (9th grade in the fall.) His words, not mine, lol. I did dig into our state (Arizona) guidelines and was surprised to find that, like This is the Day stated, I award the credits I want. Huh! So that takes some of the pressure off. I'm looking at some of the local schools (ASU, Grand Canyon, don't even know where else) to see what their requirements are and I guess I don't need to stress about that. 

So thank you for some direction, so many links here it is overwhelming! I have a nice cuppa coffee as I peruse everything....LoriD, you are amazing!!!!

 

(((Hugs))) It can be stressful when you start thinking about it! You don't have to know what you'll use for all 4 years or every course exactly (you can change your mind along the way!) but it does help to have a 4-year plan in mind, and it's really not too early to start planning out high school to make sure you are aiming for the credits your student will need for college. Best wishes!

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