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Looking for an entertaining overview of medieval history


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We were planning to use a lecture series from the Great Courses to cover medieval history this year, but the first course Early Middle Ages was just too dry for DD and she doesn't want to continue with the next two courses by the same instructor. We've got medieval literature covered this year by using Roman Roads DVDs, which is a lit/history course, but she'd like to supplement with something just focused on the history - maybe a more lively lecture series with visuals, or an entertaining history text? BTW, she's not a fan of SWB's medieval history book. Ideas?  

Edited by jjeepa
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One supplement you might consider is Larry Gonick's Cartoon History of the Universe. (Be aware that this might not be the best choice if you are a conservative family.)

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Cartoon_History_of_the_Universe

My daughter read through these volumes to accompany her world history studies in 7th through 10th grades.

Regards,

Kareni

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Since it is a supplement, does it have to be high school level? For entertainment value (but not necessarily chronological flow or cohesiveness), Horrible Histories books are pretty high on the list.

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I think I know which Great Courses prof you're referring to (Daileader?). Many seem to love him, according to reviews, but we found him a bit too dry also, the year we covered medieval history. We switched to the courses by Dorsey Armstrong, and both DS and I enjoyed her style much more. Esp. her series about the plague, strangely enough. Any chance you can try videos by a different prof?

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  • 2 weeks later...
1 hour ago, FarmingMomma said:

This is what I was going to suggest. There is a video series that goes along with the book. I would suggest you preview the content for your comfort level. I remember one video being about nuns and monks not being so chaste. It was done very Monty Python-esque. 

 

Then I would suggest a showing of Monty Python and the Holy Grail - which, for all its frivolity, is one of the more historically accurate medieval movies. 

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On 1/8/2019 at 9:43 PM, Kareni said:

One supplement you might consider is Larry Gonick's Cartoon History of the Universe. (Be aware that this might not be the best choice if you are a conservative family.)

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Cartoon_History_of_the_Universe

My daughter read through these volumes to accompany her world history studies in 7th through 10th grades.

Regards,

Kareni

 

Those look really fun!  I'll show them to my dd and see what she thinks.  Thanks!

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On 1/8/2019 at 10:22 PM, RootAnn said:

Since it is a supplement, does it have to be high school level? For entertainment value (but not necessarily chronological flow or cohesiveness), Horrible Histories books are pretty high on the list.

 

I forgot about those!  We'll check them out.  Thanks!

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On 1/9/2019 at 3:13 AM, TarynB said:

I think I know which Great Courses prof you're referring to (Daileader?). Many seem to love him, according to reviews, but we found him a bit too dry also, the year we covered medieval history. We switched to the courses by Dorsey Armstrong, and both DS and I enjoyed her style much more. Esp. her series about the plague, strangely enough. Any chance you can try videos by a different prof?

 

Yes, it was Daileader 😬  He is so knowledgable about that time period but pretty tough to stay interested in.  I will check out Dorsey Armstrong.  Thanks for recommendation!

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On 1/17/2019 at 9:26 PM, elegantlion said:

This is what I was going to suggest. There is a video series that goes along with the book. I would suggest you preview the content for your comfort level. I remember one video being about nuns and monks not being so chaste. It was done very Monty Python-esque. 

 

Then I would suggest a showing of Monty Python and the Holy Grail - which, for all its frivolity, is one of the more historically accurate medieval movies. 

 

Thanks for the heads up!  And great idea about showing the movie...hadn't even thought about it.  

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