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DiannaKennedy

Yet Another Equine Studies Post

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Next fall, I'm planning equine science as my daughter's science selection. She'll be in 8th grade, and has been riding for 7 years; works at the barn, shows, etc. Horses are her passion, so I want to allow her to be able to dive in deeper and enjoy a science class learning about something she loves. 

I PROMISE, I have looked through loads of posts already and came up with some wonderful options. Now, I'm trying to narrow them down, with help from y'all. 

Winter Promise:
I'll be honest. The sales page here doesn't impress me. #picky
Is this meaty enough for eighth grade? 

Coursera:
This looks like it would fit our needs well. Can someone chime in and tell me if this is a self paced course? I couldn't figure that out from the website. 
Once again, is it meaty enough for eighth grade? 

The Academy at Bright Ideas Press:
Equine Science --- this looks like an excellent course. Anyone here taken the course before, or something similar? I'm interested in the size of the classes, how they are ran, etc. She's experienced with the MPOA, but those classes are small, and well organized. 

 

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My 6th grader is doing the WinterPromise one this year. It COULD be meaty enough for some 8th graders, but it's probably not meaty enough as written for a girl who has worked with horses for 7 years. Things I like about it: we're using it as art this year as she learns to draw horses in various poses, she can do it without much help from her non-horse-loving mom, and directions are clear and concise. Things I don't like: can turn into  "read this, draw this, fill out this page" if I get lazy on not adding some other things to it, some of the books are dry-y-y-y. 

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Just going to make things more difficult for you (lol) by throwing a few more ideas at you (possibly useful as supplements?):

Texas A&M PEER (Partnering for Environmental Education and Rural health)
- High School Agriculture lessons and videos -- scroll down for the section of topics specific for Equine Science
- Middle School TEKS aligned science lessons -- grade 6, grade 7, grade 8 -- formal scientific method and labs
- additional lessons and videos -- Veterinary & Science, Life Science modules, integrated STEM lessons/modules for grades 6-8

All AG online: Nelson Academy of Agriculture Online classes -- high school level; among their course offerings are Equine Science I and II
(here's a WTM mom review of the program from the January 2016 thread "Equine Science Texts/Programs")

textbooks: Equine Science (Rick Parker), or, Equine Science (Zoe Davies)

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1 minute ago, Lori D. said:

Just going to make things more difficult for you (lol) by throwing a few more ideas at you (possibly useful as supplements?):

Texas A&M PEER (Partnering for Environmental Education and Rural health)
- High School Agriculture lessons and videos -- scroll down for the section of topics specific for Equine Science
- Middle School TEKS aligned science lessons -- grade 6, grade 7, grade 8 -- formal scientific method and labs
- additional lessons and videos -- Veterinary & Science, Life Science modules, integrated STEM lessons/modules for grades 6-8

All AG online: Nelson Academy of Agriculture Online classes -- high school level; among their course offerings are Equine Science I and II
(here's a WTM mom review of the program from the January 2016 thread "Equine Science Texts/Programs")

textbooks: Equine Science (Rick Parker), or, Equine Science (Zoe Davies)

 

bahahahahaaha! Right? I poured over old posts here. I've always followed the MP scope and sequence, so I'm a bit weirded out by stepping outside the box. I'm also NOT skilled at devising lesson plans, etc. I'm used to opening and going with MP texts and lesson plans. 

In other words, I'm leaning heavily toward something where the framework is already there, and we can add to it, or delete things we don't need. 

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15 minutes ago, beckyjo said:

My 6th grader is doing the WinterPromise one this year. It COULD be meaty enough for some 8th graders, but it's probably not meaty enough as written for a girl who has worked with horses for 7 years. Things I like about it: we're using it as art this year as she learns to draw horses in various poses, she can do it without much help from her non-horse-loving mom, and directions are clear and concise. Things I don't like: can turn into  "read this, draw this, fill out this page" if I get lazy on not adding some other things to it, some of the books are dry-y-y-y. 


Sounds like your daughter and mine would get along beautifully. She has multiple books about drawing horses --- and notebooks filled with drawings as well.

Without much help from a non horse loving mom --- I'm right there with you. I think horses are beautiful, but I don't want to hang out with them all day like my daughter does. 

I appreciate your input! I think I'll cross WP off my potential list. 

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1 hour ago, DiannaKennedy said:

...I've always followed the MP scope and sequence, so I'm a bit weirded out by stepping outside the box. I'm also NOT skilled at devising lesson plans, etc. I'm used to opening and going with MP texts and lesson plans... 


It sounds like the online course at Academy at Bright Ideas Press, or possibly the All-AG online courses, would be an excellent hand-holding option. The Coursera courses are good, but do require some self-discipline/motivation (or mom doing scheduling) to make it a regular commitment so that you do it and complete it. It does look you would get grading if you go with paying for the Certificate option, which might help with staying committed to see it through. But either way, it looks like you would need to do some scheduling at least for any online course. Just rambling thoughts here... (:D

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8 minutes ago, Lori D. said:


It sounds like the online course at Academy at Bright Ideas Press, or possibly the All-AG online courses, would be an excellent hand-holding option. The Coursera courses are good, but do require some self-discipline/motivation (or mom doing scheduling) to make it a regular commitment so that you do it and complete it. It does look you would get grading if you go with paying for the Certificate option, which might help with staying committed to see it through. But either way, it looks like you would need to do some scheduling at least for any online course. Just rambling thoughts here... (:D

 

Rambling thoughts are fine and dandy! ❤️ I'm over here just spinning in circles --- "Look at ALL the things!" 

So, does that mean that Coursera is self paced? I'm totally down with that --- AND it saves some costs. (very important with show season coming my way) They had a suggested schedule, if I remember correctly. 

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14 minutes ago, DiannaKennedy said:

 

Rambling thoughts are fine and dandy! ❤️ I'm over here just spinning in circles --- "Look at ALL the things!" 

So, does that mean that Coursera is self paced? I'm totally down with that --- AND it saves some costs. (very important with show season coming my way) They had a suggested schedule, if I remember correctly. 


Well, self-paced as in "you decide when/how during this week you want to complete this week's material". It looks like it's a 6 week course, and you would need to complete it in 6 weeks. It's not so self-paced that you can take 6 months to complete the 6 week course. But it doesn't state things very clearly about scheduling, so that is just how *I* am reading the syllabus for the Equine Welfare and Management Course on Coursera. (IS that the course you were looking at for DD??)

The nice thing is that the syllabus breaks down how many videos, what readings, and how many quizzes, with a time estimate per week, so that should help you make up a schedule for your DD each week to make sure the course gets done. Their estimate is 18 hours to complete the course -- roughly 3 hours/week.

That's such a short program of study that you might also want to look at doing something else as well, after completing this course. Maybe look at the 4-H Equine program and do some of the units as hands-on exercises, if the PEER materials seem too daunting??

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40 minutes ago, Lori D. said:


Well, self-paced as in "you decide when/how during this week you want to complete this week's material". It looks like it's a 6 week course, and you would need to complete it in 6 weeks. It's not so self-paced that you can take 6 months to complete the 6 week course. But it doesn't state things very clearly about scheduling, so that is just how *I* am reading the syllabus for the Equine Welfare and Management Course on Coursera. (IS that the course you were looking at for DD??)

The nice thing is that the syllabus breaks down how many videos, what readings, and how many quizzes, with a time estimate per week, so that should help you make up a schedule for your DD each week to make sure the course gets done. Their estimate is 18 hours to complete the course -- roughly 3 hours/week.

That's such a short program of study that you might also want to look at doing something else as well, after completing this course. Maybe look at the 4-H Equine program and do some of the units as hands-on exercises, if the PEER materials seem too daunting??

 

A HA! I meant self paced in --- you can start any time. Thank you for that clarification. Now this makes sense. 

I'm looking at TWO actually:
The Horse Course and/or Equine Welfare and Management. I wasn't sure if I could call a six week course good enough for a year of science. Of course, let's be frank. I'm in KY, so we're not highly regulated. I could have her take the two courses, add in shows, barn work, trips to the farrier, vet, equine dentist, etc. 

I appreciate the hand holding. Like I said -- I've never forged out on my own, so I'm second guessing myself.

I like the 4H stuff as well. Will take a closer look when I get home. 

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28 minutes ago, DiannaKennedy said:

... The Horse Course and/or Equine Welfare and Management. I wasn't sure if I could call a six week course good enough for a year of science. Of course, let's be frank. I'm in KY, so we're not highly regulated. I could have her take the two courses, add in shows, barn work, trips to the farrier, vet, equine dentist, etc. ...


Totally JMO -- even for an 8th grader, I personally would not count 2 six-week courses (total of 12 weeks / 39 hours of time) as enough to equal one school year (36 weeks) of science. Especially since there is none of the more formal aspects of Science that an 8th grader is starting to be exposed to in preparation for typical high school Science courses. I totally get it that you are moving toward the less formal/traditional course of study that homeschooling allows for (yea!), but (again, JMO) I think that non-traditional studies still need to challenge the student to some extent.

Again, totally just me, but I'd have the student do both courses in one semester, and then use the second semester to either dig deeper with her own research/study on specific topics that she was interested in, and do some "labs" or formal activities (4-H, or PEER, or Winter Promise, or...). Or doing some intensive study with a local horse trainer or volunteer work with a local large animal vet. Or use the courses as a springboard into digging into one of the meaty textbooks (by Parker or Davies). Or starting a more general Zoology or Life Science or Biology study in the following summer, spending about 3 hours a week all semester.

BEST of luck as you plan to be more informal and follow your DD's passion! And hope you both really ENJOY the journey! Warmest regards, Lori D.

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On 1/6/2019 at 6:24 PM, Lori D. said:


Totally JMO -- even for an 8th grader, I personally would not count 2 six-week courses (total of 12 weeks / 39 hours of time) as enough to equal one school year (36 weeks) of science. Especially since there is none of the more formal aspects of Science that an 8th grader is starting to be exposed to in preparation for typical high school Science courses. I totally get it that you are moving toward the less formal/traditional course of study that homeschooling allows for (yea!), but (again, JMO) I think that non-traditional studies still need to challenge the student to some extent.

Again, totally just me, but I'd have the student do both courses in one semester, and then use the second semester to either dig deeper with her own research/study on specific topics that she was interested in, and do some "labs" or formal activities (4-H, or PEER, or Winter Promise, or...). Or doing some intensive study with a local horse trainer or volunteer work with a local large animal vet. Or use the courses as a springboard into digging into one of the meaty textbooks (by Parker or Davies). Or starting a more general Zoology or Life Science or Biology study in the following summer, spending about 3 hours a week all semester.

BEST of luck as you plan to be more informal and follow your DD's passion! And hope you both really ENJOY the journey! Warmest regards, Lori D.

 

This is exactly what I needed to hear --- because I have ZERO experience in what makes up a course, etc. I spoke with her current science teacher, and she felt like Physical Science would be the logical progression for her. We will see. I need to sit down and hash some things out with my husband. We will likely look into these courses over the summer. 

I appreciate your help, Lori. 

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