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Ktgrok

please please train your dogs!

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I'm petsitting the neighbor's great dane puppy, about 6 or 7 months old. She doesn't know how to sit reliably and is almost never on a leash, and not trained on a leash. I put a leash on her as she doesn't know commands like "off" the furniture (with muddy paws), etc. She trampled my dog who was in a down stay on his bed, to lay on it. I pulled on the leash to move her to the bed I'd made for her and because she's never had anyone apply leash pressure (and doesn't know verbal commands) and is a very shy dog in general she flipped out and peed on my dog's bed. 

This is after bolting through the screen on my patio and tearing it. 

And after I went over to get her and their other dog literally shoved me over to bolt out the front door, wouldn't come when called, and I had to chase her through the neighborhood in my bare feet. Both her other dogs tried to bolt and I managed to stop the mastiff mix but not the skinnier doberman mix who was content to shove me out of the way. 

Y'all, train your dogs. Please. Some day someone other than you may be dealing with them, and they will appreciate it. These are all sweet dogs, but my goodness! I'm still happy to do it, and the dog is sweet as pie, but we will be working on some obedience while here (with owner's blessing of course....thankfully this dog loves treats so training isn't hard, it just has to be done)

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2 minutes ago, unsinkable said:

Goodness! I hope you and all the dogs are OK!

yes, just annoyed, lol. 

My dog is now up on the couch (he's allowed with permission, and since his bed is in the wash now, figured might as well) snuggling with the toddler. 

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Holy cow!  I thought it was bad that my dog doesn’t walk beside me....she has decided it’s not worth her while to learn anything else. Sit, stay, and shake are good enough for her pea-brain.

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Those are some really large breeds to allow to have such bad manners!  Even the sweetest large dog is dangerous to smaller people or unsteady/frail.  

I must say I am so spoiled in Europe.  I won't say I've *never* met a bad dog here, but the grand, grand, grand majority are very well-behaved.  To get a license to own a dog here (legally required), you must sign your dog up for dog school and your dog has to pass or repeat the course.  

 

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10 minutes ago, Monica_in_Switzerland said:

Those are some really large breeds to allow to have such bad manners!  Even the sweetest large dog is dangerous to smaller people or unsteady/frail.  

I must say I am so spoiled in Europe.  I won't say I've *never* met a bad dog here, but the grand, grand, grand majority are very well-behaved.  To get a license to own a dog here (legally required), you must sign your dog up for dog school and your dog has to pass or repeat the course.  

 

I know! I actually didn't take the toddler in with me to their house because I knew the mastiff mix would jump up (he did). But I didn't know they'd rush the door. Meanwhile the dane puppy is afraid of thresholds...still....so I was trying to drag her out once I caught and locked up the other dogs. It was like one of those riddles about moving the chickens and the corn and fox across the river or something...how to get one dog who hates going through doorways out, while keeping the others in, and utilizing various baby gates, etc. Then going back in to let the other dogs out of the baby gated area and into another area. 

At least this one doesn't jump up!

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YES to the topic of this post.  I just spent time with someone I love a lot who has a poorly trained dog and it was NOT fun.  I won't be doing that particular event again, not with that dog.  And the thing is, the dog is really a sweet-natured dog.  Just poorly trained.  FIX THAT.  (Please.) (Or I will jump up on you with muddy paws and ruin your sweater with my nails.)

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And that's why so many people don't like dogs because untrained dog behavior is the norm in their world.  In my personal experience it's the rare dog owner who does the basics well with their dog.  If your dog barks a lot, jumps on or at people, sniffs crotches, and doesn't come and stay when called, it's not getting the basics. When my kid wants to get a dog I explain why we're not good candidates for one: I don't want to clean up after it, train it, limit travel because of it, exercise it, or pay for it. With a pet it's all or nothing. We choose nothing. Those willing to do all can have all the dogs they want because they're good dog owners.

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And she won't stop whining when I put her in the crate, despite them telling me she was crate trained. Sigh. She's asleep on my other couch now, lol. 

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This is why I haven't gotten a dog yet. I know that I'm not in a place in life to train it properly, and I loathe badly-behaved dogs.

We used to have neighbors who regularly let their Alaskan Malamute chase our small children. We tried talking to them about it, but they blew us off and said they couldn't help it, they had five kids. So what did they do? Got another Alaskan Malamute and had another kid. SMH. You're the owner. Figure.It.Out.

And don't even get me started on my relatives and their nasty little yippy dogs who are rewarded with treats for bad behavior ('cause the poor little dears are acting out because they need love and attention), and are allowed and encouraged to urinate and defecate indoors because it's easier than taking them outside.

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14 minutes ago, Ktgrok said:

And she won't stop whining when I put her in the crate, despite them telling me she was crate trained. Sigh. She's asleep on my other couch now, lol. 

does she like a peanut butter kong?  i'd try her in the crate with it.

 

 

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I'm going to brag on my brother a little bit... 😉

My brother has an extremely well-trained dog and I am so thankful!

The dog is a lab-rott mix -- she's large.

I have allergies and would prefer to have no animals in my house, but my brother lives in another state and brings her with him when he comes to visit.  At first he left her outside on the porch, but I told him that it was really too hot for her and he could bring her in and set her up in the unfinished basement.  She did well there, so I allowed the dog on the main floor of the house. 

My brother sets a large pillow on the floor in an out-of-the-way spot and tells her to stay.  And she does.  For HOURS.  It is really amazing.  She is old now and sleeps most of the time.  He will take her out in the yard to chase a ball or whatever every so often, and then she comes in and stays.

When they leave I only have one small area of the house that I need to clean dog hair off of.  It's actually a pleasure to have her come visit.  :)

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49 minutes ago, Junie said:

I'm going to brag on my brother a little bit... 😉

My brother has an extremely well-trained dog and I am so thankful!

The dog is a lab-rott mix -- she's large.

I have allergies and would prefer to have no animals in my house, but my brother lives in another state and brings her with him when he comes to visit.  At first he left her outside on the porch, but I told him that it was really too hot for her and he could bring her in and set her up in the unfinished basement.  She did well there, so I allowed the dog on the main floor of the house. 

My brother sets a large pillow on the floor in an out-of-the-way spot and tells her to stay.  And she does.  For HOURS.  It is really amazing.  She is old now and sleeps most of the time.  He will take her out in the yard to chase a ball or whatever every so often, and then she comes in and stays.

When they leave I only have one small area of the house that I need to clean dog hair off of.  It's actually a pleasure to have her come visit.  🙂

After the recall (coming when called), the place command may be the most important one! We are working on having that rock solid with our dog. 

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Oh man, yes, especially with a Great Dane. I love our 2+ year old GD, but they definitely come with some challenging behaviors and their size compounds the situation. We did not train our smaller dogs terribly well, but so glad we put work into the big guy.

Edited by GoodGrief1

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Sigh, the last couple of dogs we have haven't been well trained.

One flunked out of obedience school and the previous owners almost put her down.  We took her but she could be aggressive with my youngest and my other dog, so we debated putting her down too.  My middle son cried and begged us not to, and we waited it out, and she died much later from natural causes, but she was untrainable.

Current dog is sweet as can be, and will not bulldoze or bolt, BUT, if she doesn't feel like coming to the door, she won't.  If you call her and she doesn't feel like coming.....she doesn't.  She is like a cat.  We often joke that we have a cat and not a dog.  She wouldn't hurt a fly (ok, maybe a fly....she has killed rodents and such in the yard).  

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28 minutes ago, DawnM said:

Sigh, the last couple of dogs we have haven't been well trained.

One flunked out of obedience school and the previous owners almost put her down.  We took her but she could be aggressive with my youngest and my other dog, so we debated putting her down too.  My middle son cried and begged us not to, and we waited it out, and she died much later from natural causes, but she was untrainable.

Current dog is sweet as can be, and will not bulldoze or bolt, BUT, if she doesn't feel like coming to the door, she won't.  If you call her and she doesn't feel like coming.....she doesn't.  She is like a cat.  We often joke that we have a cat and not a dog.  She wouldn't hurt a fly (ok, maybe a fly....she has killed rodents and such in the yard).  

Is current dog a terrier by any chance?

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14 hours ago, Ktgrok said:

Is current dog a terrier by any chance?

 

No, she is a lab mix.  I will add that she doesn't get on furniture, and she is quite timid, so, if you are firm, she cowers......but if she has ventured into the neighbor's yard, and you call, she isn't coming back until she feels like it.

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I just posted a dog training spin off question but I would like to add: please train your dog or don't take them out in public. And when you take them out in public make sure they are on a secure leash and that you are strong enough to control them. I have had so many instances of problematic dogs (all off leash) while my dog was controlled and leashed that there are some places I will no longer take my dog because it is just not worth it. 

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Yes, well behaved dogs are a delight.  Not so well trained ones are not.

Yesterday I was walking with a friend with my Aussie and her tiny dog.  We were in an off leash trail area.  You have to carry a leash but dogs are allowed off leash.  We had zero issues with all of the dogs we passed.  Dogs would greet each other, sniff and then follow their owners.  No barking, no fights, etc.  It was so nice 

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9 hours ago, Ktgrok said:

After the recall (coming when called), the place command may be the most important one! We are working on having that rock solid with our dog. 

 

Out of curiosity, do you have a training method/book/guru that you follow?  I'll probably only ever have imaginary dogs (DH is anti-dog 😱) but I love reading about these things.

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15 hours ago, Homeschool Mom in AZ said:

And that's why so many people don't like dogs because untrained dog behavior is the norm in their world.  In my personal experience it's the rare dog owner who does the basics well with their dog.  If your dog barks a lot, jumps on or at people, sniffs crotches, and doesn't come and stay when called, it's not getting the basics. When my kid wants to get a dog I explain why we're not good candidates for one: I don't want to clean up after it, train it, limit travel because of it, exercise it, or pay for it. With a pet it's all or nothing. We choose nothing. Those willing to do all can have all the dogs they want because they're good dog owners.

I have said this before: I like my dog; OPD (Other People’s Dogs) I often do not like at all. (I don’t currently have a dog because I can’t spend time on one right now.) 

Soooooo many people have obnoxious, unbearable dogs. 

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5 hours ago, Monica_in_Switzerland said:

 

Out of curiosity, do you have a training method/book/guru that you follow?  I'll probably only ever have imaginary dogs (DH is anti-dog 😱) but I love reading about these things.

At the risk of being shunned by other dog lovers on this forum, I'll admit I'm what is known as a balanced trainer, who uses rewards and punishments (versus just reward based training). But for reading material that is interesting I'd suggest The Culture Clash and The Other End of the Leash and For the Love of a Dog. (those all lean positive only or mostly, which is where I start with puppies). The DogVinci Code was also a pretty decent read but the author's youtube video lecture was better. On the correction side of it I tend to use some of the methods of Solid K9 Training (they have a zillion youtube videos but they are not safe for kids - lots of cursing and some inappropriate sexual joking around - he used to own a sex shop) and although they are NOT the kinds of techniques I ever thought I'd use, they have worked when nothing else was working, or was practical to implement with a dog with no toy drive and very low food drive. 

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FWIW, that is a very, very bratty age for dogs - especially large dogs.  That breed is also high-energy, so if you're not wearing them out, they can get destructive/hard to handle.  We have Australian shepherds and a special needs Swiss shepherd.  Same thing.  They were bred to run 11 miles a day.  We had to wear them out when they were younger or they would tear up stuff.  One of them (the Swiss shepherd) has a tendency to "run" when she's afraid, so she has to wear a GPS tracker on her collar.  Also, from what you were describing, it sounds like the dog has some anxiety, probably from being in a new place.

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She’s actually really really low energy compared to my other dogs, LOL. But I’ve always had high-energy dogs. She’s not being distructive  at all. Well except for the screened patio but that was an accident. She just didn’t see the screen.She  mostly just wants to lay around she just has zero manners. If you tell her to get off the couch she looks at you and utter confusion. She has no idea what you were talking about. Doesn’t know to come when called either. There are other dogs don’t either. Last night she would not come when I called her to go outside. She wouldn’t get off my kids bed. Ended up peeing on the floor at 4 AM because she didn’t go out before bed. We will be working on off and come a lot today Because wrestling and 80 or 90 pound puppy is not on my list of things I want to do. She will be getting most of her food today as treats during training. In many ways she’s a much much easier dog then my own was at this age. She just needs to learn some human manners.

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18 hours ago, prairiewindmomma said:

A well-behaved dog is such a delight......and a poorly behaved one is a nightmare. 

Much like children 🙂

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10 hours ago, Monica_in_Switzerland said:

 

Out of curiosity, do you have a training method/book/guru that you follow?  I'll probably only ever have imaginary dogs (DH is anti-dog 😱) but I love reading about these things.

my dd's breeder recommended Ian Dunbar.  I really like Zac  George's YouTube channel.   (and he demonstrates his techniques with lots of cute puppies.)

 

I think there also needs to be a list of behaviors that qualifies as "trained". . . . .being in someone's house and their very adult dog (no claiming "it's just a puppy" as an excuse) starts sniffing at your plate of food.. . or even just looks at you with pitiful eyes . . .

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1 hour ago, sassenach said:

Much like children 🙂

puppies definitely have their childhood equivalents.

puppy comes to my house - he grabs his favorite toy when I pick him up - takes it outsisde and drops it before getting in the car .. .(we're going to work on this)

runs to the kitchen as soon as he gets here looking for food.   he wants you to hold the bone while he chomps on it (he's getting the message he's supposed to hold it himself.   maybe he learned "drop it" too well.) - and he wants you to look at him while he plays. I'm constantly telling him if he wants me to throw the toy - he has to bring it to me and then let me actually have it. (he'll lay down and start chomping - until i look away, then he's back to wanting me to look at him.)   he's very much like a little kid. 

he also doesn't like the wet ground.  he can be such a wuss.   I have to walk all the way across the deck to get him to go to the grass to do his business - and he's completely housebroken.   I'm curious to see how he reacts to snow.

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5 minutes ago, gardenmom5 said:

puppies definitely have their childhood equivalents.

puppy comes to my house - he grabs his favorite toy when I pick him up - takes it outsisde and drops it before getting in the car .. .(we're going to work on this)

runs to the kitchen as soon as he gets here looking for food.   he wants you to hold the bone while he chomps on it (he's getting the message he's supposed to hold it himself.   maybe he learned "drop it" too well.) - and he wants you to look at him while he plays. I'm constantly telling him if he wants me to throw the toy - he has to bring it to me and then let me actually have it. (he'll lay down and start chomping - until i look away, then he's back to wanting me to look at him.)   he's very much like a little kid. 

he also doesn't like the wet ground.  he can be such a wuss.   I have to walk all the way across the deck to get him to go to the grass to do his business - and he's completely housebroken.   I'm curious to see how he reacts to snow.

 

We have a 10wk old lab puppy. When we got our first big rain a couple of weeks ago, he REFUSED to go potty. I had to resort to holding an umbrella over him. So we're outside, he's on an awkward part of our planter, so I am holding the umbrella out over him while I get absolutely drenched. I look up and my neighbor is just standing there staring at me. I felt so ridiculous. So embarrasing. I yelled across to him (we're super friendly) "I swear I'm not one of THOSE dog owners!" He just laughed.

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My adult dd has a 15 month-old golden that they've worked on training--extensively!  My youngest son got a rescue puppy (6 months old now) who is smart and sweet, and they really have not worked on training her. It's a disaster in the making if they don't start getting after it. She still isn't 100% potty trained, but a few more months, she'll be fine.

My dil wanted to bring her as a service dog on a plane, but I had to be the bad guy and say no about bringing her to the AirBnb.  (I had already negotiated with the ABNB owner to bring one large dog, since her place was dog friendly, but only for small dogs.) 

From what I saw yesterday in the airport, the dogs accompanying people were very well behaved.  Darling puppy is just not there yet.  So I'm glad I had the excuse of the accommodations. 

And don't even get me started on service dogs who aren't really that, at least not yet. 

 

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33 minutes ago, Halftime Hope said:

My adult dd has a 15 month-old golden that they've worked on training--extensively!  My youngest son got a rescue puppy (6 months old now) who is smart and sweet, and they really have not worked on training her. It's a disaster in the making if they don't start getting after it. She still isn't 100% potty trained, but a few more months, she'll be fine.

My dil wanted to bring her as a service dog on a plane, but I had to be the bad guy and say no about bringing her to the AirBnb.  (I had already negotiated with the ABNB owner to bring one large dog, since her place was dog friendly, but only for small dogs.) 

From what I saw yesterday in the airport, the dogs accompanying people were very well behaved.  Darling puppy is just not there yet.  So I'm glad I had the excuse of the accommodations. 

And don't even get me started on service dogs who aren't really that, at least not yet. 

 

glad you were the bad guy.  tired of people passing fido as a service dog.

stores around here are getting more assertive - with larger signs clearly stating *service dogs* are welcome. (and pets aren't.) 

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So it turns out she has a UTI, with frank blood in her urine, poor thing! She's on antibiotics now, and my husband and I have both been working with her on her training and she's doing really well. I hate that they likely won't keep it up, but at least now she knows what "off" means in regards to the furniture, will come when you call her in the house, will sit politely for treats, etc.  She's quite smart and eager to please, she just needs training. Well, and a ton of socialization and counterconditioning because she's afraid of her own shadow, and gets spooked after dark. I'm actually wondering if her eyesight isn't great at night as she gets really spooked and was back to barking at my husband and son once it was late. But calmed down more quickly than the first night. And is happy to get treats and pets from them again this morning. 

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 I recently was talking to my MIL how her dog used to always jump on me and I was glad she finally at age 12 no longer did it. Turns out MIL PURPOSELY didn’t train her not to jump on people. They used to do search and rescue and that was the signal the dog had found something. I couldn’t believe they couldn’t come up with another signal or at least teach her not to jump on other people when they weren’t searching.  The dog is a lab/border collie mix, I always thought I was about to be knocked over, especially when she ran toward me first. 

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We used to live in a neighborhood with neighbors who had 12 badly behaved, completely untrained dobermans. Yes, TWELVE Dobermans. They were really sweet dogs, but it's no fun getting rushed by an entire herd of large dogs (that always jumped on people) every time you go into your back yard. Once I caught one standing on the hood of my car. We spent the money to put up a fence and learned that fences really do help neighbor relationships.

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1 hour ago, Rachel said:

 I recently was talking to my MIL how her dog used to always jump on me and I was glad she finally at age 12 no longer did it. Turns out MIL PURPOSELY didn’t train her not to jump on people. They used to do search and rescue and that was the signal the dog had found something. I couldn’t believe they couldn’t come up with another signal or at least teach her not to jump on other people when they weren’t searching.  The dog is a lab/border collie mix, I always thought I was about to be knocked over, especially when she ran toward me first. 

I think a bark alert or passive alert (sit) or grabbing a special tug on the handler's belt or on the dog's collar are often used. Obviously less obnoxious!!!! It's something I've looked into but never been in a position to do, even when I had a fabulous dog for it. It's on my "someday" list. I have to keep in shape so I can start doing it at age 50 I guess 🙂

1 hour ago, mom2scouts said:

We used to live in a neighborhood with neighbors who had 12 badly behaved, completely untrained dobermans. Yes, TWELVE Dobermans. They were really sweet dogs, but it's no fun getting rushed by an entire herd of large dogs (that always jumped on people) every time you go into your back yard. Once I caught one standing on the hood of my car. We spent the money to put up a fence and learned that fences really do help neighbor relationships.

I can't even...wow. And dobermans are so easy to train!!!!! So smart, willing to please, etc!

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