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Where to start? Grade 6 student currently in school


Shannie
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Hello!

I hope this is the right place.   My daughter is 11 years old and in Grade 6.  She is a couple years behind in both math and language due to an LD/ Dyslexia.  She also has ADHD, is overwhelmed very easily,  has great difficulty regulating her emotions (it is a fairly severe problem).  On top of that, she has Celiac Disease and gets glutened constantly causing her to miss school, get brain fog, and become very irritable.  She also has restless leg syndrome making it hard for her to get a good nights sleep a lot of the time.

My concerns are:

  • that the school system is just pushing her along.  She has no time to learn the basics because she is forced to be in a class where all the work is above her level.  They really do not modify at all for her which they are supposed to.  Instead, they just mark her with different expectations.  Seeing work that is so far above where she is at is very overwhelming and discouraging for her.
  • The school has never taught basic spelling... I realize most kids are able to just pick this up but she still struggles with very basic words.  The other day she wrote, "pat" instead of "pet".
  • She misses a lot of school because of therapist appointments, doctors appointments and being sick.
  • That her emotional wellbeing is really being impacted because of school and being overwhelmed.
  • We are unable to do any "after-schooling" because she is DONE at the end of the day.  As well she dances 4 days which she loves.  She is the kind of kid that constantly wants to be on the go.

 

I work 3 days a week, and can work from home.  I also teach ballet twice a week at night.  My thinking was if we could do some formal schooling most days, and over the summer she would be getting enough in...

My main question is if we do go through with pulling her out of school where do we begin? (do we start with something like JUMP math if so what grade level, what about reading.. spelling etc.. )

I feel like she really needs to go back to the basics in reading, math, spelling etc.  She LOVES learning about things that interest her.   In her space unit at school, she was learning well above grade level.  I would definitely be keen to follow her lead in terms of history, science, social studies etc.

I have read a lot about homeschooling because it was what I wanted to do from the time she was little, but still, I find myself overwhelmed with how to begin.  Our goal would be for her to be at a Grade 9 level by Grade 9.

Another concern I have with her is compliance.  She can be very defiant at times, and I worry she will refuse to work with me when I need her too.  I don't have flexibility to work when she wants to.

Thank you so much if you have read this far.  Not sure if it matters but we live in Ontario.

 

 

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I would start with talking with your daughter about her feelings about homeschooling.  If she doesn’t want to do it, I would not because trying to homeschool a resistant preteen-teen is too hard.

 If she does want to, I’d start with an agreement about cooperation (possibly a signed agreement, including also that you will listen to problems or issues she is having and do your best to make things work for her, but she has to agree on her side to put in time and effort with good attitude.)

If homeschooling is something you both want to do, report back here, and specific suggestions about materials to use etc. an be made.

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Hi Pen.  Thanks for your reply.  

I should have included that my daughter has been begging to be homeschooled for about a year now.  I just not sure she has the capacity to really understand what that would look like and mean for her.  

I am feeling pretty sure about doing this, I am just not sure how to make it work logistically when I go to the office.  She could go with my mom maybe once a week or one day every other week.  I am not sure my boss would be ok with her coming in on a regular basis, although I do bring them in once in a while when needed (PA Days or they aren't feeling well etc).

I also think I need to have some sort of plan in place for my husband.  He has always been dead set against homeschooling but he is as frustrated as I am at this point.

Thanks again. 

 

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It should take less time to get school done at home than at school if she is focused on getting it done.  Have you looked up minerals and vitamins for restless leg?  She may have areas where nutrients could help other problems too and may have poor absorption from celiac not just reacting to gluten.  

I liked MUS with dyslexia because of easy print to read with lots of white space. If you use it you would use what she can already do well as basis for where to start. I’d go back to whatever is weak, and let her move quickly if she can, using as few or many practice pages as needed to master a concept. If she is weak due to difficulties memorizing tables and so on, I would work on that, but also allow an abacus or times tables chart to help. Especially if she fills in her own times table, I think that and abacus help learning. 

What can she do or not do in LA?  How well can she read and write (I mean compose and get thoughts on paper, not including spelling)?

Personally, I eliminated handwriting and greatly diminished spelling as concerns.  They are hard with dyslexia, and imo, not so important in a world with computers to word process and spell check. I realize a computer won’t pick up pat bs pet, but if she uses a text to voice program she may learn to pick up and correct errors like that herself.  

Can she type?

 

 I like your idea of letting her interests guide science and social science areas.  

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2 hours ago, Pen said:

It should take less time to get school done at home than at school if she is focused on getting it done.  Have you looked up minerals and vitamins for restless leg?  She may have areas where nutrients could help other problems too and may have poor absorption from celiac not just reacting to gluten.  

I liked MUS with dyslexia because of easy print to read with lots of white space. If you use it you would use what she can already do well as basis for where to start. I’d go back to whatever is weak, and let her move quickly if she can, using as few or many practice pages as needed to master a concept. If she is weak due to difficulties memorizing tables and so on, I would work on that, but also allow an abacus or times tables chart to help. Especially if she fills in her own times table, I think that and abacus help learning. 

What can she do or not do in LA?  How well can she read and write (I mean compose and get thoughts on paper, not including spelling)?

Personally, I eliminated handwriting and greatly diminished spelling as concerns.  They are hard with dyslexia, and imo, not so important in a world with computers to word process and spell check. I realize a computer won’t pick up pat bs pet, but if she uses a text to voice program she may learn to pick up and correct errors like that herself.  

Can she type?

 

 I like your idea of letting her interests guide science and social science areas.  

Hi Again.  Thank you so much for your help!

MUS sounds good.  The white space for her is really important.  She completely shuts down if there is too much crammed on one page and one of her teachers had her using manipulatives and it really helped her grasp the concepts.

Honestly, I am not sure about her reading.  I think she is probably at an end of Grade 3 level but the school tried to tell us she is only a year behind.   I have pushed them on this but they just keep giving us encouraging comments which I think are just to get me off their backs.    

For composing her thoughts.  If I help her by typing for her and help her to organize herself before starting she does quite well.   She is generally a very expressive girl but when it comes to answering questions she will just give the most basic answer even though with prompting she can easily come up with more information, but she never does that on her own.  If she can she will just do a one-word answer.

She can type... just not well or properly.  I did a few years of typing so I know how good it is to learn the proper way.  I would love for her to be working on that now but she has no capacity for it.   With homeschooling, I would definitely see typing as something to work on.    She uses Google Read and Write very well (so well she taught her class last year), but she does also like to type things out.

I have read a lot on how much homeschooling people do per week or day etc. and of course there are a million different answers.  Do you have any thoughts on what would be appropriate for someone like my daughter?   I would see there being structured/ instructional learning time, independent learning (for example the research she did on Space), and then things like her dance, art lessons with someone like my mom, personal art projects, baking/ cooking etc.

 

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23 minutes ago, Shannie said:

Hi Again.  Thank you so much for your help!

MUS sounds good.  The white space for her is really important.  She completely shuts down if there is too much crammed on one page and one of her teachers had her using manipulatives and it really helped her grasp the concepts.

Honestly, I am not sure about her reading.  I think she is probably at an end of Grade 3 level but the school tried to tell us she is only a year behind.   I have pushed them on this but they just keep giving us encouraging comments which I think are just to get me off their backs.    

For grade 3 level, Language! By Sopris West publisher was recommended to my son.  It didn’t work out for him because at the time we tried it first it was too advanced for him, and then he was beyond it.  It was also more “busy” on the page with color, side bars, cartoons, than he could handle. But take a look because it is a whole LA program that can be used with kids who are not reading on grade level, but with more interesting content, usually.  It is one of the programs that is recommended with dyslexia where student can read, but not well.  

My son actually did use High Noon Reading Pprogram.  If your daughter reads at 3rd grade level then she is beyond their learn to read Program, however they have huge numbers of hi interest / low level books (with good type face and lay out for dyslexia) that may be a big help — you could find her ability level and let her choose what interests her. Www.highnoonbooks.com

 

I recommend using the High Noon and / or Barton tests online to check her reading level to be sure she does not need the fundamentals of phonics.  

I recommend starting typing with www.Talkingfingers.com because it will prompt typing by the sound rather than letter name which can help with reading and spelling.  Later my son used Typing for kids platinum, which is game based and pretty fun he said.  

 

Look at Www.bravewriter.com for writing composition. Consider the online “kidswrite basic” class at a time (maybe summer) when you can put doing it first without other academics or maybe just some math, and have some topic she learned about and wants to write about in mind, such as space or dance.  

23 minutes ago, Shannie said:

 

For composing her thoughts.  If I help her by typing for her and help her to organize herself before starting she does quite well.  

 

Totally fine to scribe for her and to help her organize herself!

23 minutes ago, Shannie said:

She is generally a very expressive girl but when it comes to answering questions she will just give the most basic answer even though with prompting she can easily come up with more information, but she never does that on her own.  If she can she will just do a one-word answer.

That’s Normal behavior:) . Keep prompting when you want more. 

23 minutes ago, Shannie said:

 

She can type... just not well or properly.  I did a few years of typing so I know how good it is to learn the proper way.  I would love for her to be working on that now but she has no capacity for it.   With homeschooling, I would definitely see typing as something to work on.    She uses Google Read and Write very well (so well she taught her class last year), but she does also like to type things out.

I don’t know what that is. Sounds interesting.

23 minutes ago, Shannie said:

 

I have read a lot on how much homeschooling people do per week or day etc. and of course there are a million different answers.  Do you have any thoughts on what would be appropriate for someone like my daughter?   I would see there being structured/ instructional learning time, independent learning (for example the research she did on Space), and then things like her dance, art lessons with someone like my mom, personal art projects, baking/ cooking etc.

 

 

Yes.  Dance art cooking all can be part of school. And you don’t need to call it that if calling it that makes it less fun.  As much as she is interested in running with her own independent learning that’s great. 

I prefer more short sessions spread through day on academics to enhance learning —which might also work well with your work schedule .  

Math I suggest 2 half hour sessions per day 5 days per week or the equivalent.  

Language arts to start I suggest 10 minutes per day writing something she feels like writing (poetry, story, diary...) at least 3 times per week.     As able on her own or with scribing help.  No criticism.  No correction unless she requests it.  Offer to read it or to listen to her read it, but if she wants to keep it private that’s fine  

3 15 minute reading sessions (or start with shorter if 15 is too much right now) out loud to you or another relative (can even be over phone to someone) whatever she wants to read at her “instructional level” ( where it is just slightly difficult) 5 days per week and at least 10 minutes one time the other 2 days.   Help her with words she doesn’t know and emphasize reading with feeling and comprehension, not just getting the words right.

Add Some Independent reading of something that is easily in her ability to read it, and that she likes. as soon as possible—unless she does that on her own in which case that’s great.

typing maybe 15 minutes per day 3 times per week.  My son liked it and spent more than that.  It is also a good thing for her to be able to do independently while you are busy.  

Audiobooks. At a harder level than she can read herself.  Can be fiction, classics, or a way to learn history and some science.  I recommend trying Susan Wise Bauer’s history series for children on audio. The whole series in order imo is a good way to do it.  She doesn’t need to do any projects with it, and she can tell you about it rather than have to write anything if you want to check comprehension.  Goal: a basic overview of history not to memorize details.   This again can be something she can do while you are busy.  Maybe an hour or two per day on “school days”.  You can also utilize car travel time and waiting room at medical appointments time with audiobook listening. 

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Does she have an official diagnosis? Does she have an IEP at school? Has the school given you documentation of the testing that shows her reading level (if she has an IEP, they should have done this testing)? Is this a public school, and are you in the United States?

All of those questions can make a difference with regard to how people might answer your questions.

Has she had any tutoring to remediate the dyslexia? Those with dyslexia commonly will not be able to learn to spell with typical instruction and need specialized instruction meant for those with dyslexia. The most common "gold standard" kind of instruction for dyslexia is Orton-Gillingham. I would actually suggest that you consider searching for an OG trained tutor. Tutoring made a huge difference for my dyslexic daughter. It helps both spelling and reading.

I think it's good to be realistic. Remediating dyslexia takes more time than what would otherwise be required for homeschooling, and it takes specialized knowledge. You can purchase a program such as Barton, which is intended for homeschoolers, and is OG based, and is scripted for the homeschool parent to be able to teach it without going through OG training first. Pen mentioned High Noon, which I never used, but is another option (I don't think it is OG based, but I might be wrong). My point is that since you will be working some of the time and are hoping to plan in some independent work, it seems to make a lot of sense to pay someone else to do the hard remediation work. You can then spend your limited time and effort on the other subjects.

 

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12 hours ago, Shannie said:

Another concern I have with her is compliance.  She can be very defiant at times, and I worry she will refuse to work with me when I need her too.  I don't have flexibility to work when she wants to.

I'll read the other replies, but I wanted to start with this. One, I want to assure you that you CAN homeschool and that you CAN do a brilliant job and that it will be BETTER than anything the school was doing for her. :smile:

Then I want to tell you that it's time to put all your FEARS aside and parent her in integrity as the person she is. If you want to turn this into a battle, with you worried that not hitting your goals (gr 9 by gr 9, blah blah) means something is going wrong, then yes you're setting yourself up for all kinds of problems.

You need to start with the assumption that kids WANT to do well, that they WILL try to please you when they can, and that she has a lot of problems right now that are standing in the way.

-crap poor, little to no intervention for her SLDs

-somebody allowing her body to be run roughshod with gluten when she has known celiac

-no up to date interventions for learning self-regulation

-possibly a lack of diagnosis of other things going on like co-morbid ADHD

So the FIRST thing you need to do is decide to set all YOUR anxiety aside. She will do the best she can with the help she has, and she will probably try to please you to the extent she can. And you're going to need to collaborate and work harder than you ever imagined.

I think your plan to work from home is amazing, and I think your commitment to the project is amazing. You can get there! The battle will be mental and it will first be yours. You will have to learn these things to give them to her. She will not be able to learn them on her own and they will not from a can or by buying the perfect curriculum. But the materials ARE THERE for you to learn and be able to do this.

-give her the Barton pre-test. It's free, takes about 10-15 minutes, and will give you vital information

-pursue private evals immediately if possible. You need to know if there's anything else comorbid like ADHD so that you can treat and bring in appropriate supports. Personally, I'd also want an SLP eval to screen for language issues. The TILLS is a particularly good test, and the CTOPP is really standard. You'd like narrative language testing. I would also have something like the CAPS or another pragmatics test run, just to make sure you don't have issues there.

-you need to get counseling on nutrition, mindset, etc. to improve compliance and health with her gluten. It's really hard to teach through physical problems, and it's really hard to learn through them. She's not going to will that away. Make her life very good but somehow figure out how to make it happen. It can be upbeat, like hey let's get this under control so we can have more FUN as we homeschool! And MEAN it. The number one thing you can do to improve compliance is HAVE FUN.

-I want to say that again. The number one thing you can do to improve compliance (besides getting known health problems under control and medicating ADHD and using appropriate behavioral strategies like Zones of Regulation) is HAVE FUN TOGETHER. You need to pair, playing games, cooking, sewing, whatever floats her boat. That RELATIONSHIP is going to smooth over an awful lot and keep her motivated when things are hard and dreary. For all your fears about your need to intervene, you also need to spend close to an equal amount of time doing FUN stuff together, relational stuff. It will be protective and get you the dynamic you're wanting and aren't sure how to get. I make extreme asks with my ds with autism, but I put a lot of effort into pairing and doing fun stuff together, stuff that builds our relationship. We cook, play card games, on and on. 

That's enough for now. Doubtless you've gotten other good advice. Barton is great, and we'll help you find stuff for math, writing, etc. Ronit Bird is amazing. Personally I'd start small until you have any evals done you're going to do. Reread those tests like a teacher and think about what things you're seeing there and how they could impact teaching her. Processing speed, word retrieval, these are things that radically affect how you'll work with her.

You've got this! It's going to be a lot of hard work, but you can do it. :smile:

Edited by PeterPan
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Wow!  I am really appreciative of all the amazing responses and feedback.   I haven't had a chance to sit down and take the time to full read and take in the last couple of posts (which from skimming are fantastic.

Perhaps I forgot she DOES have ADHD.  She is more on the inattentive side, but borderline hyperactive.  She has a hard time staying still at school but has always managed.  She works best when she is able to move about (at school she has a rocking chair, a "wobble stool", and a "wiggle seat", also peddles under the table.  All these really help her. 

Here is what we have or are doing to help her with her various issues.

Celiac - just an ongoing process of teaching her about cross contamination.  Overall she understands, but I do love the idea of taking her to a nutritionist, and also perhaps incorporating learning about celiac into homeshooling.  We do have her on supplements to cover our basis (also for the RLS)

ADHD - Lots of reading and meeting with psychologists and a psychiatrist to get strategies.  We tried a couple medications that didn't work.  We are meeting with our doctor to possibly try a non-stimulant.   She understands ADHD quite well for 11 years old.  She is currently working once a week with a therapist who addresses some of her ADHD challenges.  She is familiar with zones for regulation for school.  We could definitely use that at home more.

Reading - Her last reading level was R but I would have to hunt for what test that was I thought DRA.  I think they convert the DRA number to Raz-Kids lettering system. This would put her mid Grade 3.  We did Direct Instruction tutoring a couple times (last year was the second go).  I am not sure we saw results (we did with my younger daughter), as we felt like she was started at too low a level.  Her tutor asked them to reassess as she felt the same thing but that never happened.  Right now we are at a bit of a standstill.  Her teaching does do an intervention program (LLI), which is apparently pretty useless for dyslexia.  She WANTS to read.  She asks me to buy her books all the time but she never reads past the first few pages.  Reading is such an effort for her.

Psycho-Ed Assessment - We paid to have a full psycho-ed assessment done when she was 7-8.  Some of the things we found out..

  • She is on the very low end of average for processing speed (my other daughter is well into the below average category)
  • Her intellectual ability was right in the middle of average
  • Low Average working memory
  • Verbal Delayed was in the 95% (she is great at remember when there is a delay in time)
  • Visual Delayed she was 12%
  • Oral Language - all normal
  • Phonological - low average
  • Reading/Math related - everything was below average
  • Poor graphomotor skills (fine motor planning)
  • Significant deficits in Executive Functioning
  • "Specific Learning Disorder"

Many many thanks again!

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13 hours ago, Storygirl said:

"My point is that since you will be working some of the time and are hoping to plan in some independent work, it seems to make a lot of sense to pay someone else to do the hard remediation work. You can then spend your limited time and effort on the other subjects."

This is actually what I was thinking. 🙂  Also I think reading will be the hardest for her to comply with as it is so exhausting for her.  She won't complain with a tutor! 

She is in public school (in Ontario)

1

 

13 hours ago, Storygirl said:

 

 

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12 hours ago, PeterPan said:

I'll read the other replies, but I wanted to start with this. One, I want to assure you that you CAN homeschool and that you CAN do a brilliant job and that it will be BETTER than anything the school was doing for her. 

 

I am just going to throw out a lot of ideas and you take whatever you feel works. I may be in a very similiar situation and will most likely be homeschooling my 6th grade son next year. I homeschooled my oldest but I am so out of it as far as what curriculums work I can't make a recommendation there. 

I wanted to second this and also give you a big mom hug. You can do this and make it work. There is far more flexibility  in working at home. You could do math in the mornings when she is fresh and something that requires less stamina when she is tired. They waste so much time lining up and going to PE and such that if you get a good solid 2 or so hours mixed throughout the day she will have gotten far more than you ever have done. The dancing is excellent. Can you add some rhythm and metronome work using that? Its a bit redundant but it helps timing and control of the brain. Stick with the exercise you might find this video interesting on exercise and ADHD. If I could I would take both my kids to the YMCA  early in the morning and exercise( or swim)  then come back and do school but I can't make that work. It sounds like you have dancing so keep that going for sure!

First nutrition:  you might want to have a look at this site Nutrition facts from Michael Gregger- Treating ADHD without stimulants .  Get as many greens and cruciferous into this kiddo you can. Its super good for the brain and for regulating emotion.  I am on this Broccoli sprouts, salad, and Green smoothie kick.  I first started eating this way for myself because of a cancer diagnosis. Broccoli sprouts( so easy to grow) are very very good for Breast Cancer so I started sprouting them. My husband always has my kiddos eat a handful of baby spinach at meals. Well, he started putting out the Broccoli sprouts and my kiddos really really like them.  For Breakfast, my son loves some turkey for protein and a green apple and spinach smoothie. He also decided to eat Broccoli sprouts for breakfast. I was surprised in all of this but over the next month, I have noticed his attention and coping mechanisms significantly improve. I have been shocked at the changes in his ability to focus and recover from disappointment ( two areas he did not do well). I should disclose that I also took him off of dairy because he was having so many problems with sinus infections,  In my own life I have also incorporated Vitamin B and I am telling you it's like the lights went on. If there is a week that I am on vacation and unable to get a lot of green vegetables and cruciferous I am just wiped. This was a very nice unexpected side effect to my anticancer nutrition program that I felt I should pass along. Regarding Gluten kiddos who have a hard time with gluten have a hard time with dairy. If your daughter is home you could make far better meals and help her to better regulate her health. I really really like the whole foods cookbooks. Because of cancer I switched over to a whole foods plant based vegan. My family wasn't ready to go all the way so I did a few things. I took cheese and dairy out of all the food so if they want it , its either at a pizza party or they have it away from home. I made delicious plant based meals and just add a side of shredded chicken or slice of meat to the table. These meals are very easy to do gluten free because many many of them are based around beans, potatoes, Quinoa etc. Without even trying I am probably 90% gluten free eating this way. I eat 100% from rice,squash, potatoes, oatmeal, nuts, beans and veggies etc ( Thank Heavens for the instapot and a rice cooker) Since you are a dancer I am sure you have fantastic nutrition but here are a few cookbooks and ideas if you are interested. This is one I really like

Gluten-Free & Vegan for the Whole Family (EBK): Nutritious Plant-Based Meals and Snacks Everyone Will Love Kindle Edition

by Jennifer Katzinger  (Author), Raven Bonnar-Pizzorno(Foreword)
 
Here is another one I love I made the hamburger bun recipe for my mother in law who is gluten free for health reasons and WOW we made it in min bread loafs and truly this is the only gluten-free bread that everyone at the table ate for thanksgiving. I am buying her this book for christmas along with this Puffy Muffin Top Pan for baking hamburger buns and this doughnut nonstick pan

The How Can It Be Gluten Free Cookbook Volume 2: New Whole-Grain Flour Blend, 75+ Dairy-Free Recipes Kindle Edition

by America's Test Kitchen  (Editor)

Also I bought this one but haven't tried it

YumUniverse: Infinite Possibilities for a Gluten-Free, Plant-Powerful, Whole-Food Lifestyle Kindle Edition

 
Now to schooling 

The big challenge would be what to do on the days that you are working need her to also be working. I have a lot of ideas. Since she is behind and has challenges with reading you could look into some good computer modules for her to work on when you can not be hands-on. Can you get an IPAD for christmas? There are a lot of options with an ipad and a computer. 

I am also on this big kick about Fast Forword. My son should have been able to do it at school but they only have licenses for kids with an IEP who qualify. Instead, I paid 800 for the software and around that same amount for coaching for an entire year of that program. We just finished it and I can say it improved every area of his academics ( except maybe handwriting) It starts at the most basic sound production and works to full reading and analyzing materials. The initial sound program( called foundations) helps guide the brain from sound to language . The second level is an add-on that provides reading and language support. It doesn't teach the material but it allows practice and repetition in what you have already taught. It would be outstanding for her to work on while you need her occupied with minimal support. I also like the hearbuilder Auditory memory model. Both of these use an IPAD

It would be awesome if there was also a guided math program online because this would provider he support while you are working. I don't have a good lead on that.

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I am sure that you know you can pay for raz-kids and do it at home. I used it extensively with one of my kiddos. Again love that IPAD-

For my son Fast forword provided me an opportunity to start at the most basic sound level and go all the way through to grade 6. The data was good so I could tell where the squeaky boards were and what needed extra attention. The problem is buying materials that can be used from 1st to 6th grade that are not going to be too expensive and are age appropriate. It more drills and provides repetitions needed for mastery. I would have liked to have had more time to really teach units based on some of the material in fast forword. but other things got in the way. Still my son went up 3 standard deviations in all of the listening skills for auditory processing so we really got our money & time out of that program. Maybe Consider doing Foundations in Fast Forword and then going on to Barton. It would solidify all of her auditory processes and I think really help with the dyslexia. It is about tuning that auditory system and very very essential for reading success and life. 

The principle is good though. Start at an early level and work through the curriculum. That would help you find where she missed information. It gives you an opportunity to nail the squeaky boards down and build a solid structure. 

I have the "all about reading" program from level 1 to level 4 that starts at the beginning and goes all the way through. I can't sell it because I took the books apart and put them in binders but I am all done with it so if you feel that would be of help let me know and I can pass it on. It has an accompanying All about spelling that is very good . I used the first book but also worked out of a few other areas. I dipped my toe in "logic of English" but found it wasn't a great fit. 

I am not up on the Classical curriculums but I will be reading this thread with interest. 

I think a first strategy is to try a Saturday school with mom. See if you guys can work together and if you have the stamina to take this on. That will give you a good idea before you take the leap and pull her out of school. I loved the tutor idea but I haven't found one that can work with my son so I choose to do that part. The challenge is consistancy. Little drops in a bucket everyday. 

 

Edited by exercise_guru
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2 hours ago, Shannie said:

We tried a couple medications that didn't work. 

Hmm, that's really interesting. Good time to check for retained reflexes. No, your OT might not have done them.

https://bartonreading.com/students/#ss Here's the free Barton student screening. The reason to do it is she may have some foundational skill gaps that you could easily intervene on. That will boost your confidence. A tutor is a great idea too, but it only matters that it gets done, not who does it. 

It sounds like you've been really active and engaged with the IEP process, which is putting you in a good position to jump right in. That low working memory the psych found is going to get screened on the Barton screening tool. She may need some work there.

You can buy wobble chairs, etc. to use in your home! I just bought one for my ds, hehe. I don't know if they ship to Canada, but here you go https://www.overstock.com/Home-Garden/Kore-Teen-Wobble-Chair-Black/17761226/product.html?refccid=WN3RV62JM53YD3KJ6RM2UBVPCM&searchidx=1  And if you sign up for their email coupons, you can get another 15-20% off. 

You can go to Dollar Tree and get elastic bands to tie around the legs of her chairs for her to fidget with. Also set up a bin with her tools she likes to use either to fidget or calm down. http://puzzlepiecesllc.com/index.php The lady who runs this shop has amazing taste, so you'll get lots of great ideas. I am sending the art balls with my dd back to college. She also loves the tangle fidget toys, clickers, and the mermaid fabric/sequin animals that you rub. She's less about the stim and more about the fidget factor. Some people like simple things like sheets of bubble wrap to pop the bubbles. https://timberdoodle.com  usually also has a lot of great stuff. Theraputty or the tins of putty they sell are good. Pajaggle is good. Just see what she likes. 

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Also keep in mind that homeschooling can be accomplished while lying down, while swinging, while up a tree, on a car ride, listening to an audiobook while taking a bath, or while on an exercise bike. And in very short focused segments..  My ds did a lot of learning while in motion including learning math facts while shooting basketball baskets. We also applied some things he did to academics understanding, such as ice skating to physics .  It tends to be more adhd friendly than brick and mortar.  

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Give her the MWIA, nonsense word test, and reading grade level test at the end of my Syllables page:

http://www.thephonicspage.org/On Reading/syllablesspellsu.html

I would also give her the PAST phonological awareness test:

https://jukebox.esc13.net/vgcdeveloper/TargetedResources/LAA_G2-3_TaRe_PAST.pdf

You do not tell answers or explain what part of the word to replace, you can repeat the question, but do not say, "replace the first sound," part of the test is they may not be able to figure out where the sound is, you need to see if they can figure it out on their own, and automatic is if they figure it out on their own within 2 seconds, if it takes longer than 2 seconds, it is correct but not automatic.

There are a lot of online, audio, and DVD versions for different subjects that she can use on your work days.

If phonological awareness is not in place first, you won't make much progress with phonics until this piece is fixed, so it is important to check where she currently is with this, although it sounds like it may have been an issue when she was younger, and still might be.

I've tutored remedial reading as a volunteer literacy tutor for 24 years, and my students get a lot more motivated and compliant after a few weeks of work with well designed phonics (after phonemic awareness remediation if they need that.)  When they start to see progress, they are happy to work hard and motivated, success breeds success.

I have food allergies, and when I eat something bad, I feel horrible and can't concentrate, it does make it really hard.  Can you make your whole house gluten free to make it easier to not contaminate her food or accidentally have her eat something she shouldn't?  Controlling her food should be a lot easier if you homeschool.

Read, Write, Type combines spelling, a bit of phonemic awareness, phonics and typing.  It is a bit young and may be a bit easy, but will work on a lot of good things for her.

http://www.talkingfingers.com/read-write-type/

 

 

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3 hours ago, ElizabethB said:

http://www.thephonicspage.org/On Reading/syllablesspellsu.html

I would also give her the PAST phonological awareness test:

https://jukebox.esc13.net/vgcdeveloper/TargetedResources/LAA_G2-3_TaRe_PAST.pdf

You do not tell answers or explain what part of the word to replace, you can repeat t

 

These look really good!!!

In fact, I want to see how my own ds does with the phonological test now.  When I looked at it I realized that a few (?) of the words are potentially pronounced differently by people in different places. I can’t recall exactly, but for example, we pronounce “clothes” with the /th/ vocalized slightly, so whatever would change to it for us would change to “close” in the verb sense. 

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5 hours ago, Pen said:

 

These look really good!!!

In fact, I want to see how my own ds does with the phonological test now.  When I looked at it I realized that a few (?) of the words are potentially pronounced differently by people in different places. I can’t recall exactly, but for example, we pronounce “clothes” with the /th/ vocalized slightly, so whatever would change to it for us would change to “close” in the verb sense. 

You can change it to a similar word.  There is an longer extract of Kilpatrick with 4 versions of his test.  The book, Equipped for Reading success, has hundreds of exercises for each type and shows you how to build phonemic awareness with them, then do the exercises as short drills once it has been mastered.

https://www.cec.sped.org/~/media/Files/Professional Development/Webinars/Handouts/Excerpts from Equipped for Reading Success.pdf

Order here, although it is sometimes on Amazon.  

https://www.thereadingleague.org/shop/equipped-for-reading-success-2016-book-by-david-kilpatrick/

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