Menu
Jump to content

What's with the ads?

bethanyjoy

Horizons Math or McRuffy Math for Very Easily Distracted Child

Recommended Posts

My fourth grade daughter is very easily distracted. Her attention span is very low. However, she is very talented in art and creativity. She has a hard time learning a new math concept and then remembering it later. It currently takes her about 1 1/2 hours to get through one lesson of her math (Teaching Textbooks) each day. She is getting frustrated and hates math. Do you think I should try a different math curriculum with her? If so, would Horizons Math or McRuffy Math be better? I think she would love the color workbook pages that they both have and the manipulatives with McRuffy look like something she would enjoy (my hesitation with that is that they would turn into toys and be a cause for even more distraction). From looking at the samples, I think I would need to start with the third grade levels for both programs (although, I will give her the Horizons placement test if I decide to go with them). What are your thoughts? Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think manipulatives can help an easily distracted child, but I think too many manipulatives or the wrong sort can be a distraction.  We don't use anything cute here: no bears, frogs, nada.  It's mostly blocks, shapes, and beads, and I build in time before or after each lesson in our program for play and exploration, depending on what is being taught.  I really think there is value in simplifying the manipulatives so that they're seen as a tool first.

I also think there is value in having a program that requires interaction.  Teaching Textbooks is fine, but she isn't required to keep on task.  It will still be there waiting patiently when she is ready.  I think the human component in a lesson shouldn't be overlooked.

Whether Horizons or McRuffy would be better I couldn't tell you.  I don't have experience with either.  Do they offer bite sized pieces to the lesson?  Is there a rhythm to each lesson in the teacher's guide that is constant?  How are the manipulatives used?  I think those would be questions I'd be asking.  We have liked MEP, where each worksheet was sectioned off with different work in each one.  We've liked Math U See, where manipulatives are very simple and the worksheets are clutter free.  We've liked Gattegno, where much can be done orally and through play.  And we've liked Right Start, where I can adapt the manipulatives but the lessons have a rhythm of review, oral work, manipulative work, worksheet, games that changes slightly as it spirals through concepts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a child who loved Horizons. I did not like it. I felt it was all over the place. I thought McRuffy looked good but I never have had the chance to try it. I also think BJU looks very good and have actually had it here and been able to look at it closely. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think horizons would be a good choice between those two.  However, I think CLE would be even better than horizons.  The spiral is wider (which means more variety of problems per day and a longer time for something new to sink in) and the pages are less cluttered.  My artsy/creative yet easily distracted dd has been doing very well with it.  She doesn't love it, but she is learning the material without frustration, tears, or hours of coaxing with me at her side.  She can complete the review section without me at her elbow.  I just need to be in sight so that I can remind her to keep working if she slips off into a daydream.  I also put cardboard in front of her work area to reduce visual distraction if she should look up.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How is she with transitions between activities?

I've only used McRuffy K and Horizons K as far as sole math programs. (I have used other levels of Horizons as a supplement.) McRuffy was a better fit for my kids at that level, but Horizons K is a bit different than their upper levels, I think.

I think part of the awesomeness of McRuffy is that the games/ manipulatives are fun on their own. If you go with them, know that you don't have to do all the activities. They are there to strengthen memory and build up abilities (or help solidify a topic).

I had to build in more review using McRuffy because my kids need that constant spiral. Horizons has it built in, but isn't as fun, IMO.

[My Horizons K kid hated math when we got mostly done with that level. My two McRuffy kids both begged to go back to McRuffy when we moved onto the other math program I use levels 1-6. YMMV]

Edited by RootAnn
Auto correct fixes
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Honestly? Neither one and I have tried them over the years for different kids at different ages.

CLE is an excellent choice if you are wanting self-directed learning. All of my kids, so far, have used it off and on over the years and done well.

https://www.clp.org/store/by_subject/4 Main Maths page

https://www.clp.org/store/by_grade/21 Placement tests are here.

Saxon is also an excellent choice. There is a consistant amount of work and predictable routine to Saxon. Saxon has an Intermediate 3 available that is different from the Big Blue Book. 

https://www.christianbook.com/page/homeschool/math/saxon-math?navcat=Homeschool|Math|Saxon-Math

To get the most from these two, do not skip problems and give the placement tests starting where she places even if it is lower than you think.

BJU is also good, if you teach the lessons as outlined in the TM or use the distance learning option. BJU is not a 'hand the book over to the kid and go bake' kind of program. It must be directly taught by you. 

 

Edited by Paradox5
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CLE is not a program I have used yet, but I really like it. I think that program could be great for any kind of learner really. I already owned the Singapore math books which is why I always just started with SM with my children. One ended up on Horizon's, but like I said, I did not like it at all. It jumped all over the place. I went to the store and looked at it again and have no clue how that child liked it so much. I am guessing that child just did not like SM and Horizon's was better than SM for him. In hindsight, I think he would have loved CLE. When I have looked over CLE, I have just loved it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/3/2018 at 11:27 AM, bethanyjoy said:

My fourth grade daughter is very easily distracted. Her attention span is very low. However, she is very talented in art and creativity. She has a hard time learning a new math concept and then remembering it later. It currently takes her about 1 1/2 hours to get through one lesson of her math (Teaching Textbooks) each day. She is getting frustrated and hates math. Do you think I should try a different math curriculum with her? If so, would Horizons Math or McRuffy Math be better? I think she would love the color workbook pages that they both have and the manipulatives with McRuffy look like something she would enjoy (my hesitation with that is that they would turn into toys and be a cause for even more distraction). From looking at the samples, I think I would need to start with the third grade levels for both programs (although, I will give her the Horizons placement test if I decide to go with them). What are your thoughts? Thanks!

McRuffy: colorful, short lessons.   I haven't used Horizons math.  CLE felt overwhelming to my distractible kid.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...