Jump to content

Menu

Finally, a study which confirms my problems with concussion tests, dementia tests, hearing tests, etc


TravelingChris
 Share

Recommended Posts

https://www.drugs.com/news/doctors-office-dementia-tests-often-wrong-study-78716.html?utm_source=ddc&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Daily+News+Summary+-+November+29%2C+2018&utm_content=Doctors'+Office+Dementia+Tests+Are+Often+Wrong%3A+Study

THe study was in Neurology:An Online Journal and the original study is here -http://cp.neurology.org/content/early/2018/11/28/CPJ.0000000000000566

In this study they found that at least one of the dementia tests was totally unreliable with individuals with higher educations.  Higher education  was meant to stand in for original higher intelligence, I am sure.  Having tests that are quick and easy to administer to general population ends up mis-diagnosing people on the upper end of the intelligence spectrum and also people on the lower end too since so called easy questions like "who is the President" are too easy for upper end and too hard for lower end.  Its how I got misdiagnosed when I came to ER with concussion and I ended up having much more serious problems. Its why both dh and I pass word hearing exams (They keep using the same list and we remember original list) but on tones we have hearing loss.  

And as a separate argument, so many medical personnel do not care when you complain about loss of mental function because hey, you had more to begin with so what are you complaining about.

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interesting. My mom has Alzheimer's, and we caught on to it very early, because we had experience -- my maternal grandmother with Alzheimer's lived with us when I was a teen. I distinctly remember the moment when alarm bells rang in my mind, and I knew. Mom had to go the doctor soon after for something unrelated, and I told her to ask her GP about memory issues. I sat in the waiting room and was not present for that screening, so I don't know what the doctor used. But Mom came out of the office saying she had passed with no problem.

A year from then (maybe a little more), she got her diagnosis from a gerontologist. I was present for that appointment, and it was interesting the kind of questions that Mom had trouble with.

She passed that initial screening the previous year, but I knew.

Edited by Storygirl
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This isn't surprising, but it's good to have it confirmed.  My mother at 90 has high intelligence and passes the quick dementia test easily.  (But I know better...)

She also had a stroke about 3 months ago and passed the quick stroke test with flying colors.  (And yet a couple of us thought it was quite obvious...)

I'm glad the medical community is trying to come up with tests that easily and quickly assess people's conditions.  Unfortunately, many times signs are too subtle (or simply not typical) to be detected in a simple test.   I guess it really is best if loved ones can give their opinions;  but then, they'll need to be believed.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This happened to my Dad too.  His is a very very smart person.  After he had a stroke, he had diminished capacity for a lot of things.  His problems were mainly about finding words and following multi step directions.  Unfortunately he still tested as average for all of those things.  But average was a significant difference for him.  Ultimately it took the armed forces test from when he was drafted and the percentiles from that test to show where he was before the stroke.  

It was a long battle.  But he did eventually prove the stroke had changed his ability.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, JenneinCA said:

This happened to my Dad too.  His is a very very smart person.  After he had a stroke, he had diminished capacity for a lot of things.  His problems were mainly about finding words and following multi step directions.  Unfortunately he still tested as average for all of those things.  But average was a significant difference for him.  Ultimately it took the armed forces test from when he was drafted and the percentiles from that test to show where he was before the stroke.  

It was a long battle.  But he did eventually prove the stroke had changed his ability.

It's interesting that he seemed very aware of it himself and wanted to prove it.  In my mother's case, she was unaware of how the stroke had subtly changed her cognitively.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...