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Helping a Spanish speaking student learn English

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Any recommendations for materials for elementary age students? I have some Spanish speaking students I help once a week. I noticed that aside from issues completing homework (that's my main role) they could use support in basic reading/writing and/or speaking. I made a comment to my boss about one child's struggles with reading. She showed me the student's grade on a spelling test. She could really use the extra help. Same with some of the other students. I suggested getting some phonics in there or such. I was told if I could pick out something the church could reimburse me for it, but I am not sure what to suggest. Originally I was just talking about the LOE books (ie. Doodling Dragons) and phonogram tiles (like AAS), but now I'm thinking perhaps it would be helpful to find a resource geared toward ESL students?

Just to paint a picture, this child was not sure how to pronounce "was" and is in first grade. I can see how that is a confusing word and explained that sometimes "s" makes a "z" sound. But you know, I only have limited time with the students. There are not enough helpers there for the number of students. I can tell she wants to read, though. She kept reading for a book that was way too difficult so I had to gently talk her into an easier book. I don't think many of the parents speak English, or their English is limited. I don't know if the parents are even able to read/write in Spanish. All the children's homework is sent home in both English and Spanish (part of the instructions), but I don't know if they can read the directions.

Any thoughts, recommendations? I don't know what kind of budget I'm looking at. I also asked the Spanish teacher from my church (she teaches college level) but she didn't know about elem. materials and will try to get back to me.

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There are helpful modules online that you can use for free. However, I'm not sure where to find the good ones for Spanish-speaking students. Maybe hiring a language tutor could be a great help.

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The church runs a program to help the Spanish speaking families. These families attend the Spanish speaking Mass and most live in a trailer park. The church rents or owns a trailer where we meet after school. The kids come to the trailer and do homework with assistance (tutors are paid). Lately I’m the only tutor besides my boss the nights I can make it. She’s not totally fluent in English. I even swapped nights a couple weeks and I was still the only one a couple of those nights. They could use more but haven’t had luck. I reached out to some people I know but timing or location or whatever holds them back. I have a bilingual friend that teaches Spanish at two homeschool locations but she won’t do evenings. The thing I do is from 5-7pm. Plus I doubt it would be cost effective for her. 

This is really a “help kids complete homework” thing but you can tell much more is needed. I know for older students they had a meet at the church hall thing where they work on Rosetta Stone. I went a few times in the past as a volunteer and all they let me do is make the student read the Rosetta Stone words aloud to me. I felt like I wasn’t making much of a difference. They spoke little to no English and were probably late teens or 20 something yr olds? 

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Start with some survival words or words the student wants to know.  Explain one or two letter/sound correspondences as you go thru the list.  If they can write letters, have them make a flashcard for each word and take that home. Or have them write some sentences with these words to practice reading. On a sheet of paper is fine, or you can fold the paper into a booklet and they can write a simple word on each page and illustrate it.  They can practice and bring it back next time and review with you. Don't worry if they are memorizing a lot rather than reading; it helps to get experience speaking as well as familiarity with the letters and the sounds.  Not knowing 'was' in grade 1 at this time of year isn't a concern. ELL here is usually two years behind in reading, unless an older child in the home has taken the district's ELL program and can help.

Edited by HeighHo

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12 minutes ago, HeighHo said:

Start with some survival words or words the student wants to know.  Explain one or two letter/sound correspondences as you go thru the list.  If they can write letters, have them make a flashcard for each word and take that home. Or have them write some sentences with these words to practice reading. On a sheet of paper is fine, or you can fold the paper into a booklet and they can write a simple word on each page and illustrate it.  They can practice and bring it back next time and review with you. Don't worry if they are memorizing a lot rather than reading; it helps to get experience speaking as well as familiarity with the letters and the sounds.  Not knowing 'was' in grade 1 at this time of year isn't a concern. ELL here is usually two years behind in reading, unless an older child in the home has taken the district's ELL program and can help.

What do you mean? I don’t think there’s ANY program. They literally just go to English speaking classrooms all day long. No one is translating in school. Just the printouts for the week have some Spanish.  They do have a Spanish class — for all the kids? But other than that, they are probably expected to try to learn at “normal” pace or fail. 

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https://www.mdek12.org/EL for some state resources

No one translates aside from peers, the students are learning by immersion and they most likely have a pullout class to learn English.  They aren't expected to be at the same place an English speaker is, but they will learn a lot by immersion.  

 

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A lot of those images have been removed I think (when you click on the list).

I used to use The School Bell site. I think it's archived somewhere. I also have Fry word lists on our old Sight Word workbooks. 

I ordered a book from Usborne. Curious if it will be any good. https://new.myubam.com/p/2693/first-thousand-words-in-english-il

I'm going to bring my Doodling Dragons book this week. "Was" was a spelling word for the kids last week so I guess it wasn't so strange afterall that they didn't all know that one. "What" was another one of the words. 

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