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If you had to use a box curriculum

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39 minutes ago, Where's Toto? said:

I thought Timberdoodle just pulled together other resources?

Yes - which is why I'd likely go with them. Memorial Press pulls together other people's stuff and gives you a schedule, but I'd likely have to sub different age level stuff than their standard package, esp. the Latin.

Timberdoodle doesn't look hard to sub stuff for, either. Plus, Fun Stuff!

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3 hours ago, Where's Toto? said:

I thought Timberdoodle just pulled together other resources?

That's what a "box curriculum" is, whether it's everything from a single publisher, or everything from different publishers put together in a box by someone else.

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3 hours ago, RootAnn said:

Yes - which is why I'd likely go with them. Memorial Press pulls together other people's stuff and gives you a schedule, but I'd likely have to sub different age level stuff than their standard package, esp. the Latin.

Timberdoodle doesn't look hard to sub stuff for, either. Plus, Fun Stuff!

 

Just wanted to clarify that Memoria Press does NOT pull together other people's stuff. They make their own-and it is very high quality.

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2 minutes ago, Meadowlark said:

 

Just wanted to clarify that Memoria Press does NOT pull together other people's stuff. They make their own-and it is very high quality.

AND they pull in others.  They brought in New American Cursive, which was developed by Iris Hatfield through her company Huvista.  They bring in Rod & Staff, Story of the World, Spelling Workout, language arts by Houghton Mifflin....

They do make their own, but they do have a mix.

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18 minutes ago, Meadowlark said:

Just wanted to clarify that Memoria Press does NOT pull together other people's stuff. They make their own-and it is very high quality.

:laugh: Well, they didn't make the Rod & Staff Math, Henle Latin, College of the Redwoods Pre-A, Prentice Hall Algebra, Jurgensen Geometry, Spelling Workout, Tiner's "Exploring ..." Science books, the original "Famous Men of ..." books (public domain), and several other materials they include in their curriculum kits. Over time, they've written more of their own programs (didn't they just publish their own phonics/spelling for the lower levels?), but it isn't completely theirs (like BJU/Abeka/CLE might be).

No dig against MP meant by me. We've used a smattering of their materials over the years.

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I’ve aways considered a box curriculum to be a kit put together by someone else that gave you a daily plan to follow and you would continue from year to year just ordering the next grade level box. 

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On 10/27/2018 at 2:52 PM, teachermom2834 said:

I’ve aways considered a box curriculum to be a kit put together by someone else that gave you a daily plan to follow and you would continue from year to year just ordering the next grade level box. 

That's my definition, but I'm not really putting a definition for this post just whatever you feel feel is a "box".

I was originally thinking more along the lines of lifepac or Abeka or BJU but you guys have helped me see much farther than those! I love the ideas here for future reference (in case I ever need a list of box curriculum's). I've already looked up a few you guys have mentioned :0)

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1. Bookshark

2. Layers of Learning. Not sure this really counts as a box, but it does include all subjects except math. The LoL guides, a library card, and math would be pretty affordable. Well it doesn't include phonics, but i could teach that with Bob books from the library.

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1. Memoria Press. Maybe Calvert. They've changed it so much I don't know anymore. 

2. For grades 1-6, Rod & Staff. For grades 7+, Time4Learning. Both supplemented with free resources. 

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On 10/27/2018 at 11:16 AM, RootAnn said:

:laugh: Well, they didn't make the Rod & Staff Math, Henle Latin, College of the Redwoods Pre-A, Prentice Hall Algebra, Jurgensen Geometry, Spelling Workout, Tiner's "Exploring ..." Science books, the original "Famous Men of ..." books (public domain), and several other materials they include in their curriculum kits. Over time, they've written more of their own programs (didn't they just publish their own phonics/spelling for the lower levels?), but it isn't completely theirs (like BJU/Abeka/CLE might be).

No dig against MP meant by me. We've used a smattering of their materials over the years.

Not to quibble, but I think maybe Meadowlark was talking about their student guides and teaching materials. I mean, of course MP didn't write the source material for D'Aulaires, Famous Men or Anne of Green Gables, or Charlotte's Web or Henle, or Tiner, or Selby's classical composition or, or, or...but they do write or produce all of the teaching materials (student guides, teacher guides, DVDs, streaming videos, quizzes, tests, essay assignments) and lesson plans that come with those subjects. I mean, 1st through 4th Form Latin are basically Henle broken down, but they are written curriculum in a more easily teachable text with workbooks, quizzes, tests, DVDs, flashcards, etc., written by Cheryl Lowe. So it's not original content, but no one publishing a Latin curriculum is working with anything new. ?

But you're correct on the math and spelling. Although I think they do have their own streaming videos for the math now? Do Abeka and the others you mentioned really not use any outside sources at all? Literature? Nothing? I like CLE Math, but I don't know that I could provide a well-balanced education with only their workbooks and absolutely no outside reading.

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On 10/27/2018 at 8:30 AM, RootAnn said:

Yes - which is why I'd likely go with them. Memorial Press pulls together other people's stuff and gives you a schedule, but I'd likely have to sub different age level stuff than their standard package, esp. the Latin.

Timberdoodle doesn't look hard to sub stuff for, either. Plus, Fun Stuff!

Memoria Press uses mostly their own curriculum. Not other people’s stuff. And they are great at substituting your “box” for the level your student would need.

I would use Memoria Press, hands down. I don’t use all of theirs but I absolutely trust their education philosophy and I love every product I’ve used.

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On 10/27/2018 at 11:51 AM, HomeAgain said:

AND they pull in others.  They brought in New American Cursive, which was developed by Iris Hatfield through her company Huvista.  They bring in Rod & Staff, Story of the World, Spelling Workout, language arts by Houghton Mifflin....

They do make their own, but they do have a mix.

New American cursive was made for MP. The language arts by HM is optional, as they have their own writing, grammar, and Latin, which more than covers LA. I haven’t seems SOTW in any curriculum I’ve looked at (K-7) or used. They are developing their own spelling. Yes they use a different math, and offer other science, but their workbooks are their own.

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And Abeka has books offered that are basically abridged versions of other books, that they include in their reading curriculum. Honestly I’m not sure how they get away with that but it’s not really something I’ve looked into. We’ve used the books for my dyslexic kiddo because they are high interest books. 

Thats the other benefit to Memoria Press. They have a curriculum specifically designed (in a box!!!) for kids with LDs. Amazing option.

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5 hours ago, EmseB said:

Not to quibble, but I think maybe Meadowlark was talking about their student guides and teaching materials. I mean, of course MP didn't write the source material for D'Aulaires, Famous Men or Anne of Green Gables, or Charlotte's Web or Henle, or Tiner, or Selby's classical composition or, or, or...but they do write or produce all of the teaching materials (student guides, teacher guides, DVDs, streaming videos, quizzes, tests, essay assignments) and lesson plans that come with those subjects. I mean, 1st through 4th Form Latin are basically Henle broken down, but they are written curriculum in a more easily teachable text with workbooks, quizzes, tests, DVDs, flashcards, etc., written by Cheryl Lowe. So it's not original content, but no one publishing a Latin curriculum is working with anything new. ?

But you're correct on the math and spelling. Although I think they do have their own streaming videos for the math now? Do Abeka and the others you mentioned really not use any outside sources at all? Literature? Nothing? I like CLE Math, but I don't know that I could provide a well-balanced education with only their workbooks and absolutely no outside reading.

Well, I've only been homeschooling 13 years, so I haven't seen MP stuff since the beginning (20 years). (Despite what my oldest says, I have not been planning homeschooling since before she was born.) But, I do remember MP before they had their own LA and before First Form, and before they had their own guides for Tiner and some of the other materials you listed. They are definitely developing more and more of their own teaching materials. 

I'm way too eclectic to use boxed stuff, so I can only comment as a curriculum junkie who has perused catalogs/magalogs for years--CLE/BJU/Abeka seem to write their own readers and make their own extras for history and art and such. But, there could be exceptions that I'm unaware of or just plain not knowledge about. I've never used anything BJU  (except one year their testing service) and only used math from CLE. I've used art and math from Abeka. 

44 minutes ago, mamamoose said:

Memoria Press uses mostly their own curriculum. Not other people’s stuff. And they are great at substituting your “box” for the level your student would need.

I would use Memoria Press, hands down. I don’t use all of theirs but I absolutely trust their education philosophy and I love every product I’ve used.

Last I looked (which is probably 4-5 years), there is a limit on their substitutions. Or maybe it was a limit on how much you could substitute and still get lesson plans that work together? Their customer service is top notch-or used to be. I remember calling one time and Martin Cochran answered the phone. He had to get someone else to actually answer my question, but it was cool to know everyone answered the phone there.

My kids dislike the MP programs I've made them use, but I've mostly liked them. And, I think, once the kids get older, they will appreciate the learning MP helped them achieve.  

41 minutes ago, mamamoose said:

New American cursive was made for MP. The language arts by HM is optional, as they have their own writing, grammar, and Latin, which more than covers LA. I haven’t seems SOTW in any curriculum I’ve looked at (K-7) or used. They are developing their own spelling. Yes they use a different math, and offer other science, but their workbooks are their own.

I believe SOTW is an optional  (suggested?) summer read.

36 minutes ago, mamamoose said:

And Abeka has books offered that are basically abridged versions of other books, that they include in their reading curriculum. Honestly I’m not sure how they get away with that but it’s not really something I’ve looked into. We’ve used the books for my dyslexic kiddo because they are high interest books. 

Thats the other benefit to Memoria Press. They have a curriculum specifically designed (in a box!!!) for kids with LDs. Amazing option.

Homeschooling kids with LDs or highly gifted kids is difficult. I've been incredibly blessed to not have to do either. Companies who help with either endeavor have my respect.

My kids are mostly late readers but also just normally all over the place skill-wise. Boxes are not one-size-fits-most (for my kids) and homeschooling should be about adjusting to the needs of the kids, if possible. MP would never fit well here, but would (highly tweaked) likely fit better than a CLE box or a Sonlight box or something like My Father's World. But my non-workbook kids would probably prefer Timberdoodle's more hands-on elements.

Edited by RootAnn
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RootAnn,

There is no limit on the substitutions. I was homeschooling a special needs kiddo before their SC curriculum came out and they literally helped me design my own on my own, and provided the lesson plans for each subject separate from the curriculum guides. Their customer service is the best on the market, hands down!

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It would depend on the day and how I was feeling. 

1. Either Memoria Press or Timberdoodle

2. Rod and Staff or CLE I like them both enough, but I would get bored with everything being Menonite. 

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Well, I am going to be different and say (with being able to use what I already own):

1- k12 as an independent except for the math (Saxon fans). I have used most of their stuff over the years, and it has been ok-- with heavy modifications on the writing.

2- Oak Meadow but it depends on the grade if spelling needs to be added.

3- I think Memoria Press is affordable when compared to many others out there, so they are my third choice.

Edited by Paradox5
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This has been fascinating to read!  Sonlight didn't work well for us; I'm intrigued by Memoria Press but leery of how they do phonics with so much writing in the younger years!  And unsure of other things, too, with it, but I will definitely look into it more.  While I like crafting the "perfect" curriculum...it's exhausting and I spend SO MUCH TIME researching curriculum options.

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On 12/4/2018 at 5:06 PM, FireweedPrep said:

This has been fascinating to read!  Sonlight didn't work well for us; I'm intrigued by Memoria Press but leery of how they do phonics with so much writing in the younger years!  And unsure of other things, too, with it, but I will definitely look into it more.  While I like crafting the "perfect" curriculum...it's exhausting and I spend SO MUCH TIME researching curriculum options.

I agree there are some I hadn't thought of or knew about!

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