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online curriculum to do while travelling?

We will be travelling for one year and will be carrying laptops and kindles with us but don't want to carry math textbooks, etc. with us.  Our kids will be in grades 8, 6, 5, and 2.  We will be on five continents (skipping Antarctica and not counting the U.S., where we live) and believe the experience in and of itself will be a large part of their education for the year but we would also like them to keep up in a few subjects... math, in order to keep skills sharp... writing/reading... what else?  History seems like an obvious subject to hit on... I don't feel the need to keep up with science (or should I?)… But I am not really sure how to approach it all.  Khan Academy seems like it could be a good idea for our oldest.... maybe for all of them in math?  What would you guys do?

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When I first thought of homeschooling I imagined being able to do something like that!  Assuming no bad reason for doing this, I feel thrilled for you!

Writing: I wonder if writing could be the kids keeping diaries— or maybe a blog on the adventure that people like me could read for vicarious experience. 

Reading: I think they could just pick up a book now and then whether paper ones you get in a shop or online ones. You could also have a library membership that would last for the year. 

Everything else but math would probably come along as you travel if you are on the lookout (geography, history, and even science if you include weather and geology and nature study as you go).  Some language as you go could also be interesting to include if possible  

Math:  check it out first, but I do think that Khanacademy could be fine for all the grades you have mentioned.  Along with paper and pencils, and your help to teach anything that needs your teaching (possibly you to initiate each topic before letting them work with Khan—especially for the younger dc)    My Ds used Khanacademy (on his own mostly, as he was at a stage of wanting to be independent) in 7th grade for prealgebra and seemed to learn it solidly, moving in to the most advanced algebra class, and finding he had already done some of Algebra 1. when he went to brick and mortar school in 8th  

If your 8th grader is advanced in math and or especially enjoys math, she he could also use some alcumus. 

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If you have not seen them, the early Young Indiana Jones episodes in which  Indy travels with his family as a young boy, could be fun (maybe even helpful) to watch. 

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What an amazing opportunity! For math, what about teaching textbooks online? No books to carry around, and I would not worry one little bit of it being a bit behind as this is an experience of a lifetime and as long as they stay semi up on their stuff, they will be totally fine! 

As for writing/reading -- have them read about where you are, the history, geography, an occasional historical fiction...enough to give a foundation of knowledge but not too much to miss any real life in country experiences. 

For science, have them learn about the biomes, animals, flora and fauna of where you are . . . 

I would have them keep journals/more like notebooks and have them write about their journey, the science and history of where they are . . . what an amazing scrapbook it would be at the end of the year. 

I would not waste any part of the experience for book work. . . but I know travelling can be exhausting so down time is a must . . . that should make great opportunities to learn about where you are. 

I am a bit jealous. What an amazing gift, have a blast (and blog so we can follow along!) 😉

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Here is what I would personally look into:

-History At Our House (online classes with a fantastic teacher.  All ages)
-Reading Like A Historian (for the 8th grader. Download the documents and choose lessons based on where you're currently located/studying)

-Mystery Science (younger kids)
-Khan academy (older kids)

-Wordly Wise (8th, 6th, 5th grader)
-DanceMat Typing (2nd grader - I'd skip online spelling/vocab for her/him and just do typing)

-ST Math for 2nd, 5th, and maybe 6th grader
-Teaching Textbooks, but I'd really push for getting an actual math text and a different system for the 8th grader.  TT would be an absolute last resort here.  I would do Khan academy first.

Readers would all be e-books.  Writing would be across the curriculum or a daily diary requirement.  Grammar would be put on hold for the year.

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21 hours ago, Pen said:

When I first thought of homeschooling I imagined being able to do something like that!  Assuming no bad reason for doing this, I feel thrilled for you!

Thank you!!  Purely pleasure...to disconnect w/ our crazy lives... to bond as a family... experience different cultures... We are excited!  and overwhelmed.  😄

21 hours ago, Pen said:

Writing: I wonder if writing could be the kids keeping diaries— or maybe a blog on the adventure that people like me could read for vicarious experience. 

I love this idea.  Was thinking of starting a family blog that we take turns writing in... Would be a good way to assure the grandparents back home that we are okay 🙂

21 hours ago, Pen said:

Reading: I think they could just pick up a book now and then whether paper ones you get in a shop or online ones. You could also have a library membership that would last for the year. 

Am buying kindles all around for reading on the planes, trains, etc.... Can we access our library system back home while abroad?  Hoping so... Will need to double check that, I suppose.... 

21 hours ago, Pen said:

Math:  check it out first, but I do think that Khanacademy could be fine for all the grades you have mentioned.  Along with paper and pencils, and your help to teach anything that needs your teaching (possibly you to initiate each topic before letting them work with Khan—especially for the younger dc)    My Ds used Khanacademy (on his own mostly, as he was at a stage of wanting to be independent) in 7th grade for prealgebra and seemed to learn it solidly, moving in to the most advanced algebra class, and finding he had already done some of Algebra 1. when he went to brick and mortar school in 8th  

If your 8th grader is advanced in math and or especially enjoys math, she he could also use some alcumus

This is helpful!  alcumus -- is that aops?  We are in a brick & mortar private school and I'm hoping they all can keep up enough to continue on their progression in math... Aops looks great... They all really love math.  Our next-year-8th grader will be in precalculus (while we're gone) which feels so serious!  I am excited to know that there are online options that should be able to help them move forward.  Does alcumus (aops?) always meet for live teaching sessions?  That's what I'm gathering from looking at the website.  I really like the idea of a once a week live class but wonder about it being too restrictive?

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17 hours ago, ByGrace3 said:

What an amazing opportunity! For math, what about teaching textbooks online? No books to carry around, and I would not worry one little bit of it being a bit behind as this is an experience of a lifetime and as long as they stay semi up on their stuff, they will be totally fine! 

As for writing/reading -- have them read about where you are, the history, geography, an occasional historical fiction...enough to give a foundation of knowledge but not too much to miss any real life in country experiences. 

For science, have them learn about the biomes, animals, flora and fauna of where you are . . . 

I would have them keep journals/more like notebooks and have them write about their journey, the science and history of where they are . . . what an amazing scrapbook it would be at the end of the year. 

I would not waste any part of the experience for book work. . . but I know travelling can be exhausting so down time is a must . . . that should make great opportunities to learn about where you are. 

I am a bit jealous. What an amazing gift, have a blast (and blog so we can follow along!) 😉

Thank you so much!!

Teaching Textbooks online -- I will look at this!!

Exactly!!  Staying semi up on their stuff is the goal.... I haven't homeschooled before but I do a lot with them supporting their school work.... I have a feeling it'll take the beginning part of the trip to get a good flow (not doing too much/little)!

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8 hours ago, HomeAgain said:

Here is what I would personally look into:

-History At Our House (online classes with a fantastic teacher.  All ages)
-Reading Like A Historian (for the 8th grader. Download the documents and choose lessons based on where you're currently located/studying)

-Mystery Science (younger kids)
-Khan academy (older kids)

-Wordly Wise (8th, 6th, 5th grader)
-DanceMat Typing (2nd grader - I'd skip online spelling/vocab for her/him and just do typing)

-ST Math for 2nd, 5th, and maybe 6th grader
-Teaching Textbooks, but I'd really push for getting an actual math text and a different system for the 8th grader.  TT would be an absolute last resort here.  I would do Khan academy first.

Readers would all be e-books.  Writing would be across the curriculum or a daily diary requirement.  Grammar would be put on hold for the year.

Thank you for all these specific suggestions!!  I love that; I need things spelled out for me so this is very helpful 😋

I will look up all of these!  I've seen Teaching Textbooks suggested a few times now (also in my chat board post) -- you mention going for a different system, using TT as a last resort... I know nothing about TT so am curious your reasoning?

What is ST Math?

It probably would've been helpful if I'd mentioned math levels..... Math-wise, we'll be teaching:

Precalculus (8th grader); Algebra 1 (6th grader); Pre-Algebra (5th grader); and (if we were to stay at our current school next year) Saxon Math 5/4 (2nd grader)

Is ST Math good for the younger 3?

Our boys do Wordly Wise at school so that would be familiar (I like familiar 🙂 ).  I will have to see if there is an online option for that.... 

Those history options look excellent.  I wonder about needing more flexibility/not being able to commit to live classes... especially w/ time zones in mind.  I'll look at the website a little more to see when the classes are... 

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8 hours ago, HomeAgain said:

-Reading Like A Historian (for the 8th grader. Download the documents and choose lessons based on where you're currently located/studying)

I opened an account and have been exploring this... I am wondering how to fill in the gaps of information... I see the power point and the lesson plan, but is there a place that I'm missing that fills in the details?

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3 hours ago, UnionJack said:

Thank you!!  Purely pleasure...to disconnect w/ our crazy lives... to bond as a family... experience different cultures... We are excited!  and overwhelmed.  😄

I love this idea.  Was thinking of starting a family blog that we take turns writing in... Would be a good way to assure the grandparents back home that we are okay 🙂

Am buying kindles all around for reading on the planes, trains, etc.... Can we access our library system back home while abroad?  Hoping so... Will need to double check that, I suppose.... 

 

I Cannot say about your Particular case. But we are paying members of a library in a city we don’t live in ( we live in a rural area with no library) and can access it from a distance.

3 hours ago, UnionJack said:

 

This is helpful!  alcumus -- is that aops? 

Yes. It has problems and videos. 

3 hours ago, UnionJack said:

We are in a brick & mortar private school and I'm hoping they all can keep up enough to continue on their progression in math... Aops looks great... They all really love math.  Our next-year-8th grader will be in precalculus (while we're gone) which feels so serious! 

Wow! Precalculus in 8th! Really advanced!

3 hours ago, UnionJack said:

I am excited to know that there are online options that should be able to help them move forward.  Does alcumus (aops?) always meet for live teaching sessions?  That's what I'm gathering from looking at the website.  I really like the idea of a once a week live class but wonder about it being too restrictive?

 

Alcumus is a do on ones own program,  sfaik free and entirely online , and entirely at ones own choice of time     More like Khanacademy in time, etc, but tending toward more challenging math.  

there are also online AOPS classes that can be enrolled in. However I am not sure if your 8th grader could do a class without the year’s textbook. In addition to not knowing if you have to attend at a “live” time. 

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Just now, Pen said:

embers of a library in a city we don’t live in ( we live in a rural area with no library) and can access it from a distance.

 

That is, we can access things like Hoopla and Library2Go at a distance...anything available online as part of our membership ... not the book stacks. 

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So exciting!

Khan would be good for the 2nd grader, and I assume for the older kids as well.

Mystery science for the 2nd grader, but it's a bit young for 5th+

What about foreign language? Even if it's just learning a few different phrases and gaining a bit of familiarity with whatever writing system/alphabet is used in any of your destinations. I mean, I'd just use youtube/google for that though.

History, geography, and even some aspects of earth science based on where you are visiting.

Bravewriter and Well Trained Mind both have PDF versions of their curricula (suggesting that for English/writing in particular)

 

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15 hours ago, UnionJack said:

I opened an account and have been exploring this... I am wondering how to fill in the gaps of information... I see the power point and the lesson plan, but is there a place that I'm missing that fills in the details?

The lessons are very short.  Often there are 2-4 pages: one or two for the lesson plan, one or two for the primary source/student pages.  The students are asked to read the sources and think about what it means with guided questions from the lesson plan.  If your kids have a good background of history already, and are getting to see the places, this is more like a quick add on to give them more context to what they are observing.  (If you want to extend them, we've taken a lesson and researched more around the event using online sources, but I thought you might appreciate the slimmed down factor). 

History At Our House also does recorded classes, iirc.

I don't like Teaching Textbooks because I find the previous version too easy to game the system if a parent isn't fully paying attention.  I have no experience with the new online version.  It is not high on my possible list for my own kid because of this.  In fact, I'd probably pick a workbook I could download as a pdf and use that before I attempted TT.

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Monarch from Alpha Omega is an online curriculum.

There's also Easy Peasy All-in-One Homeschool, that uses online resources.

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9 hours ago, HomeAgain said:

The lessons are very short.  Often there are 2-4 pages: one or two for the lesson plan, one or two for the primary source/student pages.  The students are asked to read the sources and think about what it means with guided questions from the lesson plan.  If your kids have a good background of history already, and are getting to see the places, this is more like a quick add on to give them more context to what they are observing.  (If you want to extend them, we've taken a lesson and researched more around the event using online sources, but I thought you might appreciate the slimmed down factor). 

History At Our House also does recorded classes, iirc.

I don't like Teaching Textbooks because I find the previous version too easy to game the system if a parent isn't fully paying attention.  I have no experience with the new online version.  It is not high on my possible list for my own kid because of this.  In fact, I'd probably pick a workbook I could download as a pdf and use that before I attempted TT.

Oh!!  I looked too quickly and didn't scan down to see the primary source pages.  Makes sense now--thanks!

Thanks for your comments re: TT as well!

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35 minutes ago, acresoft said:

Monarch from Alpha Omega is an online curriculum.

There's also Easy Peasy All-in-One Homeschool, that uses online resources.

I hadn't heard of Monarch and watched the intro video -- I love the all-in-one-ness of it!  Will check out the other you mentioned as well.  Thank you!

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I'd suggest you take a few games, too.

These are good thinking skill games that all of your children and you could play. 

Iota The Great Big Game in The Teeny-Weeny Tin  ... the game truly is in a tiny box; however, you'll need floor or table space to play.

SET: The Family Game of Visual Perception  ... is another wonderful game.  This one comes in a box that is similar to one that would hold two decks of standard cards.

Regards,
Kareni

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1 hour ago, Kareni said:

I'd suggest you take a few games, too.

These are good thinking skill games that all of your children and you could play. 

Iota The Great Big Game in The Teeny-Weeny Tin  ... the game truly is in a tiny box; however, you'll need floor or table space to play.

SET: The Family Game of Visual Perception  ... is another wonderful game.  This one comes in a box that is similar to one that would hold two decks of standard cards.

Regards,
Kareni

We've had conversations about which game(s) we should take!  We have both of those--both great options for not taking up much space!

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2 hours ago, UnionJack said:

We've had conversations about which game(s) we should take! 

Now I'm curious as to what other games you've considered ....

Regards,
Kareni

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With the updates on the level in maths definitely look at AOPS (including BA).  Teaching textbooks is usually considered to be on the easier less challenging side.

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On ‎10‎/‎4‎/‎2018 at 8:29 PM, kiwik said:

With the updates on the level in maths definitely look at AOPS (including BA).  Teaching textbooks is usually considered to be on the easier less challenging side. 

 

That is good to know, thank you!!

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On ‎10‎/‎4‎/‎2018 at 7:33 PM, Kareni said:

Now I'm curious as to what other games you've considered ....

Regards,
Kareni

One we will most likely take is Qwixx… We all really enjoy that one and it doesn't take up much space!  During the summer, we also enjoyed both King and Queen Domino... but I don't think we will want to carry those.  I'm sure we will also take a few decks of cards!  Do you have any other suggestions for games that are not space-consuming?

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I agree that Qwixx is a good choice.

1 hour ago, UnionJack said:

Do you have any other suggestions for games that are not space-consuming? 

The first that came to mind seems to be no longer in production, but this link talks about it and mentions that it is often available on ebay and the like ~

Stellar Speller

It's not tiny, but I'd recommend Bananagrams.   You could use the tiles for other word games, spelling practice, etc.

You might start a thread devoted to the small game topic on the Chat board.  I imagine others might have good suggestions.

Regards,
Kareni

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You are quite welcome, UnionJack.  I'll admit to having a fondness for games, so it's fun to see the suggestions that others are making.

Regards,
Kareni

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