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crazyforlatin

CA related question regarding CHSPE

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Is the CHSPE similar to SAT exam in terms of difficulty or content? DD has already taken the SAT and did fine with it. Just wondering if there is a need to study for it or buy a prep book.

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NO it's EXTREMELY easy, on the level of an academic 9th grader.  If your dd got above average on the SAT she does not need to study for the CHSPE.  ? My son passed it in 8th grade, my daughter could have also passed it after algebra 1/14 years old.

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Have her pay careful attention to her time allocation. My son had to take it twice due to having spent too much time on the English portion. I made him pay for the 2nd time.

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Yeah, it is expensive and it does take a few hours and you might have to drive to a random high school not close to your home.  Therefore, it might be worth getting the CHSPE book so she can look it over and see what parts she might struggle more or obsess over.  As in Laurel's example, maybe going into it he might have an idea of how many minutes per section maybe he would have not had to go back ?

I have heard a few people locally whose kids failed numerous times but they were unschoolers and the daughter also had a mild learning disability which makes test taking very hard.  But for an academic homeschooler, (with no LD's) who is finished Algebra one and had a solid background in grammar, writing and sentence mechanics usually I'd say it can be passed after 9th grade.  ?

Edited by Calming Tea
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It depends on your daughter. My son did in much less time then they allow in one sitting. He was done so early I was nervous that he didn't pass. Well, he passed without any problem the first time.

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We took ours @ the county dept. of education. For us it was right down the street, but for others it might've been quite a drive.

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If Dd passes the CHSPE in 8th grade and takes 2 classes per year at the local cc, will she be considered a transfer student on college applications? Do we get a choice whether to label her as transfer or freshman? Or does the individual college decide that for us? 

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On 10/1/2018 at 7:29 AM, Calming Tea said:

NO it's EXTREMELY easy, on the level of an academic 9th grader.  If your dd got above average on the SAT she does not need to study for the CHSPE.  ? My son passed it in 8th grade, my daughter could have also passed it after algebra 1/14 years old.

 

Did you use the PSA? Because my kids won’t meet the criteria for eligibility 

“A person may take the CHSPE only if he or she meets one of the following requirements on the test date: 

He or she is at least 16 years old, or

He or she has been enrolled in the tenth grade for one academic year or longer, or

He or she will complete one academic year of enrollment in the tenth grade at the end of the semester during which the CHSPE regular administration (i.e., spring or fall) will be conducted.” https://www.chspe.net/about/faq/#5

44 minutes ago, crazyforlatin said:

If Dd passes the CHSPE in 8th grade and takes 2 classes per year at the local cc, will she be considered a transfer student on college applications? Do we get a choice whether to label her as transfer or freshman? Or does the individual college decide that for us? 

 

I do think it is college dependent. One of the college on DS13’s wish list states that dual enrollment courses taken in high school would fall under freshman application. The general advice I heard was to make sure the high school graduation date should be after the associate degree completion date. So basically complete an associate degree in high school and not after high school graduation. My district middle college program is in 10th and 11th grade so that makes sense since kids would complete their associate degree portion hopefully by end of 11th grade and finish their remaining high school graduation requirements by 12th grade. 

Edited by Arcadia
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2 hours ago, Arcadia said:

 

 

Did you use the PSA? Because my kids won’t meet the criteria for eligibility 

“A person may take the CHSPE only if he or she meets one of the following requirements on the test date: 

He or she is at least 16 years old, or

He or she has been enrolled in the tenth grade for one academic year or longer, or

He or she will complete one academic year of enrollment in the tenth grade at the end of the semester during which the CHSPE regular administration (i.e., spring or fall) will be conducted.” https://www.chspe.net/about/faq/#5

 

 

I'm not the best person to comment on the above since we're new at this. DD won't be able to take the test until next March; we’re a bit late for October's test.

I asked a different question regarding CHSPE on Facebook. As long as the student has taken some 10th grade or above classes or is currently taking 10th grade level courses, we can claim 10th grade status on CSHPE while still maintaining on the PSA that ungraded secondary student

One of your sons is taking a college class, correct? So it must be one that allows younger kids?  Our local CC says that H.S. student has to be 16 years old or completed 120 credit hours, which CHSPE would satisfy. But there are more friendly CCs towards younger students, but I’m not sure if the drive is worth it.

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14 minutes ago, crazyforlatin said:

One of your sons is taking a college class, correct? So it must be one that allows younger kids?  Our local CC says that H.S. student has to be 16 years old or completed 120 credit hours, which CHSPE would satisfy. But there are more friendly CCs towards younger students, but I’m not sure if the drive is worth it.

 

DS13 is taking math under Stanford Pre-Collegiate Studies which is using the same syllabus as Stanford Online High School. Foothill college allows dual enrollment for 9th grade and up (https://foothill.edu/reg/admission/highschool.html). They want the 2018/2019 PSA which I just filed on September 30th, and an unofficial high school transcript. 

ETA:

I am thinking of the CHSPE more as a get over and done with, than for dual enrollment purpose.

Edited by Arcadia
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8 minutes ago, Arcadia said:

 

DS13 is taking math under Stanford Pre-Collegiate Studies which is using the same syllabus as Stanford Online High School. Foothill college allows dual enrollment for 9th grade and up (https://foothill.edu/reg/admission/highschool.html). They want the 2018/2019 PSA which I just filed on September 30th, and an unofficial high school transcript. 

Is Stanford Pre-Collegiate Studies the same application process as SOHS? Just wondering if you had to go through SSAT, essay, and transcript submission for the Pre-Collegiate. One of the things we are doing right now is preparing to apply to SOHS. And I feel like the course descriptions are way too detailed for a high school application.

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21 minutes ago, crazyforlatin said:

Is Stanford Pre-Collegiate Studies the same application process as SOHS? Just wondering if you had to go through SSAT, essay, and transcript submission for the Pre-Collegiate. One of the things we are doing right now is preparing to apply to SOHS. And I feel like the course descriptions are way too detailed for a high school application.

 

Nope, and cheaper ?  My DS13 is only interested in the math and physics courses which are $1,500 per course under SPCS versus $4,700 per course for Stanford OHS. 

His application only requires an unofficial transcript, a work sample (in his case math since he was applying for a math course) and a letter of recommendation. He wrote a one liner on why he wanted to take that course. My unofficial transcript was really bland and unofficial, listed in UC a-g format, no course descriptions required. Honestly, I think the person checking the application is mainly concerned about his AP Calculus BC score which is a required prerequisite. My LOTE and Fine Arts categories on his transcript were empty and no questions were asked. 

ETA:

I think you can use SAT or ACT scores in lieu of SSAT for Stanford OHS. 

“Standardized Testing 

All applicants must submit a score report from one of the seven approved tests. Your score report must be received with your application, by the application deadline.” https://onlinehighschool.stanford.edu/international-and-homeschooled-applicants

Edited by Arcadia
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44 minutes ago, Arcadia said:

 

Nope, and cheaper ?  My DS13 is only interested in the math and physics courses which are $1,500 per course under SPCS versus $4,700 per course for Stanford OHS. 

His application only requires an unofficial transcript, a work sample (in his case math since he was applying for a math course) and a letter of recommendation. He wrote a one liner on why he wanted to take that course. My unofficial transcript was really bland and unofficial, listed in UC a-g format, no course descriptions required. Honestly, I think the person checking the application is mainly concerned about his AP Calculus BC score which is a required prerequisite. My LOTE and Fine Arts categories on his transcript were empty and no questions were asked. 

ETA:

I think you can use SAT or ACT scores in lieu of SSAT for Stanford OHS. 

“Standardized Testing 

All applicants must submit a score report from one of the seven approved tests. Your score report must be received with your application, by the application deadline.” https://onlinehighschool.stanford.edu/international-and-homeschooled-applicants

 

Not exactly. It’s $1500 per class, so $3k per year. Cheaper but not by much. And very little feedback or grading. We checked and wil pass.

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45 minutes ago, Arcadia said:

 

Nope, and cheaper ?  My DS13 is only interested in the math and physics courses which are $1,500 per course under SPCS versus $4,700 per course for Stanford OHS. 

His application only requires an unofficial transcript, a work sample (in his case math since he was applying for a math course) and a letter of recommendation. He wrote a one liner on why he wanted to take that course. My unofficial transcript was really bland and unofficial, listed in UC a-g format, no course descriptions required. Honestly, I think the person checking the application is mainly concerned about his AP Calculus BC score which is a required prerequisite. My LOTE and Fine Arts categories on his transcript were empty and no questions were asked. 

ETA:

I think you can use SAT or ACT scores in lieu of SSAT for Stanford OHS. 

“Standardized Testing 

All applicants must submit a score report from one of the seven approved tests. Your score report must be received with your application, by the application deadline.” https://onlinehighschool.stanford.edu/international-and-homeschooled-applicants

Did you have AoPS write the recommendation letter? Just curious bc we're going to ask for one, and I don't know how detailed the teacher will be.

I'm concerned that our CC is so impacted that we will won't be able to take good classes like biology.

 

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1 minute ago, Roadrunner said:

Not exactly. It’s $1500 per class, so $3k per year. Cheaper but not by much. And very little feedback or grading. We checked and wil pass.

 

DS13 takes at least two math courses per year usually so it’s a saving of $3,200 x 2 courses = $6,400 per year for us. If he takes the physics courses as well, that would work out to be $12,800 savings per year compared with taking the equivalent courses under Stanford OHS. 

He doesn’t care for feedback and the teacher is available for questions by email and during class time. He doesn’t want to dual enroll for math so this option is the best fit so far for him. 

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6 minutes ago, Arcadia said:

 

He doesn’t care for feedback and the teacher is available for questions by email and during class time.

 

I think this is key. For me the feedback and support is what I am paying for. And $3k a year is a looot if money to pay for minimal feedback. Otherwise I can just have my kid watch the bunch of lectures available for free through various universities. I know your children really are very unique, but I can’t imagine minimal anything with my children. ☺️

I think they treat their OHS students very differently given extra fees. So I am just pointing out that the two aren’t necessarily equivalent options. The latter is better and more expensive. And offers a ton of classes. 

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8 minutes ago, crazyforlatin said:

Did you have AoPS write the recommendation letter? Just curious bc we're going to ask for one, and I don't know how detailed the teacher will be.

 

We didn’t submit a letter of recommendation. I asked if I could get a waiver and it was (luckily for me) waived. We submitted his application in August and he had five AP scores in STEM subjects already so I don’t think they were that picky about his math course application missing a Letter of Recommendation.

We are looking at CC for fine arts (computer graphics) courses so not too worried about CC being impacted. 

daijobu’s daughter took single courses with Stanford OHS. You could PM her about the application process.

You would need to find a proctor for Stanford OHS exams. We are using SJSU testing services as they can proctor Stanford OHS and Stanford PCS exams.

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2 minutes ago, Roadrunner said:

. Otherwise I can just have my kid watch the bunch of lectures available for free through various universities. 

The latter is better and more expensive. And offers a ton of classes. 

 

My kid would never watch a bunch of lectures without outside accountability. Else I could save a lot of money by having him take MOOC. Those were flops for both my kids. Some board members have used the MIT OCW courses successfully with their kids.

Stanford OHS does offer a ton of classes. Unfortunately my kid is mainly interested in the math ones and partially interested in the physics ones. Until he needs the better quality of Stanford OHS for math or physics, he’ll make do with the cheaper option for now. 

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3 hours ago, Arcadia said:

 

Nope, and cheaper ?  My DS13 is only interested in the math and physics courses which are $1,500 per course under SPCS versus $4,700 per course for Stanford OHS. 

His application only requires an unofficial transcript, a work sample (in his case math since he was applying for a math course) and a letter of recommendation. He wrote a one liner on why he wanted to take that course. My unofficial transcript was really bland and unofficial, listed in UC a-g format, no course descriptions required. Honestly, I think the person checking the application is mainly concerned about his AP Calculus BC score which is a required prerequisite. My LOTE and Fine Arts categories on his transcript were empty and no questions were asked. 

ETA:

I think you can use SAT or ACT scores in lieu of SSAT for Stanford OHS. 

“Standardized Testing 

All applicants must submit a score report from one of the seven approved tests. Your score report must be received with your application, by the application deadline.” https://onlinehighschool.stanford.edu/international-and-homeschooled-applicants

I didn’t keep the SAT score because I assumed we would take it again in high school. Back in the summer I didn’t think about dual enrollment. Of course now the local university (not CC) at which Dd would like to take a humanities class requires the SAT and a full application.

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47 minutes ago, crazyforlatin said:

I didn’t keep the SAT score because I assumed we would take it again in high school. Back in the summer I didn’t think about dual enrollment. Of course now the local university (not CC) at which Dd would like to take a humanities class requires the SAT and a full application.

 

Did your daughter take in June? I would ask the local university if they would accept a notarized copy of your daughter’s paper score report.  If she took in August, the score would be kept in the system until next July.  I kept both kids scores since the colleges stated they would ignore middle school SAT scores for college applications. 

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3 hours ago, Arcadia said:

 

Did your daughter take in June? I would ask the local university if they would accept a notarized copy of your daughter’s paper score report.  If she took in August, the score would be kept in the system until next July.  I kept both kids scores since the colleges stated they would ignore middle school SAT scores for college applications. 

It was March 2018; I'm going to call the university to ask.

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15 hours ago, Arcadia said:

 

 

Did you use the PSA? Because my kids won’t meet the criteria for eligibility 

“A person may take the CHSPE only if he or she meets one of the following requirements on the test date: 

He or she is at least 16 years old, or

He or she has been enrolled in the tenth grade for one academic year or longer, or

He or she will complete one academic year of enrollment in the tenth grade at the end of the semester during which the CHSPE regular administration (i.e., spring or fall) will be conducted.” https://www.chspe.net/about/faq/#5

 

I do think it is college dependent. One of the college on DS13’s wish list states that dual enrollment courses taken in high school would fall under freshman application. The general advice I heard was to make sure the high school graduation date should be after the associate degree completion date. So basically complete an associate degree in high school and not after high school graduation. My district middle college program is in 10th and 11th grade so that makes sense since kids would complete their associate degree portion hopefully by end of 11th grade and finish their remaining high school graduation requirements by 12th grade. 

Is this a California-specific thing? Because I ran down this question of college classes in high school or earlier a while back and was told unanimously that so long as you don’t matriculate anywhere, you can collect all the credits you want and still apply as a freshman...

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