Jump to content

Menu

Calling Hive Life Coaches/Amateur Career Planners!


goldberry
 Share

Recommended Posts

It's been a year since DD is off to college and I still can't figure out my path forward.

I have worked part time as long as I was homeschooling, in bookkeeping.  I work one to two days a week remotely (on my home computer) for a great company that pays me well and is super flexible.  I won't give up that job, the pay is good as well as the relationship there.  I work one other day a week at a local company.  I enjoy that job because of the environment, and they also are very flexible with me.  Pay for that job is "okay".

DH and I need to start working on our retirement plans. We've both been self employed, so no pensions, etc. We have a wonderful house in a great area that we would like to stay in ultimately.  But, the tentative plan is that after DD gets married (next June) we are going to rent out our house and buy a cheaper house to fix up and either sell or rent.  That's our plan right now to start accumulating retirement money or investment property over the next 10 years, flipping houses or rental properties.  The other factor is aging parents requiring sudden trips out of town.

Given the part time job that I don't think it would be smart to give up, plus upcoming plans to be moving around, plus need for flexibility with aging parents, I don't see how I can get a job right now that would have me committed to being somewhere.   But, I need to have something to work towards that will "satisfy" me.  Right now I feel totally aimless.  I like a job with a challenge intellectually.  I like to be busy so I don't sit on the couch and stare at the internet all day.  Apparently, I have a hard time with self-discipline right now!

I love school.  Before DD started homeschooling, I went to college for a year and loved it.  (That's all the college I have, one year.) But at that time, which was many years ago, I wanted to pursue a counseling degree.  That's not really reasonable anymore.  The time it would take plus the money it would cost would not work out right now, especially given that we need to be MAKING money and SAVING money for retirement.  It would be reasonable for me to pursue a two-year something, or POSSIBLY even a four-year something, but I don't even have anything on the list that I'm interested in that fits those categories.  I feel like if I don't find something to be working towards FOR ME, I'm going to go bonkers. It's depressing.    

So my parameters appear to be:   2 year or 4 year max schooling.  Not a job that will tie me down to 40 hours a week at one location, but one more suited to flexibility and part time work.  I love healthcare related things and places (I watch surgery shows, read medical journals), but I'm a fainter with needles, so can't be a paramedic or nurse, and I don't like routine healthcare stuff like CNA work.  I am VERY interested in counseling, psychology, mental health issues.  But it doesn't seem like I can do anything with those. Yes I have massive bookkeeping experience and could probably grab some other part time jobs in that field.  But it's boring!  It's not growing or going anywhere or learning anything, and doesn't satisfy my need to have a goal or challenge to work towards.  When I was younger I loved writing and always wrote short stories etc.  But I haven't done that since my 20s and don't even know if I'm any good at at all.   

Part of me says just get those extra bookkeeping hours to make money and stay busy, and forget about growing and challenging.  That seems most "logical" right now given all our circumstances.  But I hate that idea. ☹️

I need a plan for the next five years or so that I can get on board with and feel good about and challenged by.  Suggestions?  Help??

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are you sure about the house flipping thing? They make it look so easy on TV, but the people I know who have done it haven’t ended up making anywhere near as much money as they thought they would (and one lost a substantial amount of money when the house cost more than expected to renovate and sold for a lot less than they’d hoped.) And these were people with a lot of experience in residential construction and repair. 

Edited to add:  Also, living in a house while you’re renovating it may get old (and miserable) very quickly!

Edited by Catwoman
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Catwoman said:

Are you sure about the house flipping thing? They make it look so easy on TV, but the people I know who have done it haven’t ended up making anywhere near as much money as they thought they would (and one lost a substantial amount of money when the house cost more than expected to renovate and sold for a lot less than they’d hoped.) And these were people with a lot of experience in residential construction and repair. 

Edited to add:  Also, living in a house while you’re renovating it may get old (and miserable) very quickly!

BIL has been doing a combo of house flipping, acquiring rental properties for many years and has been successful at it.  It can be dicey, we know.  But not sure what else we can accomplish in the next 10 years to generate income for retirement. Even if I bulked up my income it won't be THAT much on it's own.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, goldberry said:

BIL has been doing a combo of house flipping, acquiring rental properties for many years and has been successful at it.  It can be dicey, we know.  But not sure what else we can accomplish in the next 10 years to generate income for retirement. Even if I bulked up my income it won't be THAT much on it's own.

 

I hope it works out for you. Hopefully, your BIL will be able to give you ideas and pointers, which will give you a big leg up on other people who may have construction experience, but might not have the same knack for choosing the right properties and knowing how to save money on renovations, as well as how to price the properties to get them sold quickly.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, goldberry said:

It's been a year since DD is off to college and I still can't figure out my path forward.

I have worked part time as long as I was homeschooling, in bookkeeping.  I work one to two days a week remotely (on my home computer) for a great company that pays me well and is super flexible.  I won't give up that job, the pay is good as well as the relationship there.  I work one other day a week at a local company.  I enjoy that job because of the environment, and they also are very flexible with me.  Pay for that job is "okay".

DH and I need to start working on our retirement plans. We've both been self employed, so no pensions, etc. We have a wonderful house in a great area that we would like to stay in ultimately.  But, the tentative plan is that after DD gets married (next June) we are going to rent out our house and buy a cheaper house to fix up and either sell or rent.  That's our plan right now to start accumulating retirement money or investment property over the next 10 years, flipping houses or rental properties.  The other factor is aging parents requiring sudden trips out of town.

Given the part time job that I don't think it would be smart to give up, plus upcoming plans to be moving around, plus need for flexibility with aging parents, I don't see how I can get a job right now that would have me committed to being somewhere.   But, I need to have something to work towards that will "satisfy" me.  Right now I feel totally aimless.  I like a job with a challenge intellectually.  I like to be busy so I don't sit on the couch and stare at the internet all day.  Apparently, I have a hard time with self-discipline right now!

I love school.  Before DD started homeschooling, I went to college for a year and loved it.  (That's all the college I have, one year.) But at that time, which was many years ago, I wanted to pursue a counseling degree.  That's not really reasonable anymore.  The time it would take plus the money it would cost would not work out right now, especially given that we need to be MAKING money and SAVING money for retirement.  It would be reasonable for me to pursue a two-year something, or POSSIBLY even a four-year something, but I don't even have anything on the list that I'm interested in that fits those categories.  I feel like if I don't find something to be working towards FOR ME, I'm going to go bonkers. It's depressing.    

So my parameters appear to be:   2 year or 4 year max schooling.  Not a job that will tie me down to 40 hours a week at one location, but one more suited to flexibility and part time work.  I love healthcare related things and places (I watch surgery shows, read medical journals), but I'm a fainter with needles, so can't be a paramedic or nurse, and I don't like routine healthcare stuff like CNA work.  I am VERY interested in counseling, psychology, mental health issues.  But it doesn't seem like I can do anything with those. Yes I have massive bookkeeping experience and could probably grab some other part time jobs in that field.  But it's boring!  It's not growing or going anywhere or learning anything, and doesn't satisfy my need to have a goal or challenge to work towards.  When I was younger I loved writing and always wrote short stories etc.  But I haven't done that since my 20s and don't even know if I'm any good at at all.   

Part of me says just get those extra bookkeeping hours to make money and stay busy, and forget about growing and challenging.  That seems most "logical" right now given all our circumstances.  But I hate that idea. ☹️

I need a plan for the next five years or so that I can get on board with and feel good about and challenged by.  Suggestions?  Help??

 

If staying with bookkeeping is the most logical choice, can you grow and be challenged outside of work through hobbies or activities? 

My job is pretty tedious much of the time, but I don't mind because it makes good money. Then when I'm not working, I have several pursuits that I love and that keep me very busy and challenged.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 minutes ago, Selkie said:

If staying with bookkeeping is the most logical choice, can you grow and be challenged outside of work through hobbies or activities? 

My job is pretty tedious much of the time, but I don't mind because it makes good money. Then when I'm not working, I have several pursuits that I love and that keep me very busy and challenged.

I don't have any pursuits that challenge me like that.  I read. I've been walking to get in better health, but I don't like it enough to start working toward K5s or anything.  I do calligraphy just for enjoyment, but I'm not really good enough at it to sell it or do it as a job.

Personality-wise, I like goals, the feeling of achieving something tangible, or working towards something with a set definition.  I don't have any hobbies like that and have not been able to think of any.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, goldberry said:

Personality-wise, I like goals, the feeling of achieving something tangible, or working towards something with a set definition.

 

Being an auditor works for my friends who like goals. They found being an accountant at a company was too much of the same thing while auditing requires them to be at clients place for 3 to 6 months depending on complexity. Let’s just say books are cooked so auditing gets very interesting in terms of ethics and accountants trying to divert attention when asked about mismatched numbers. They work for PwC and KPMG which aren’t without scandals.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, goldberry said:

I don't have any pursuits that challenge me like that.  I read. I've been walking to get in better health, but I don't like it enough to start working toward K5s or anything.  I do calligraphy just for enjoyment, but I'm not really good enough at it to sell it or do it as a job.

Personality-wise, I like goals, the feeling of achieving something tangible, or working towards something with a set definition.  I don't have any hobbies like that and have not been able to think of any.

 

You mentioned a possible 4-year degree. If you choose Behavioral Health or Psych -even with a two year degree from a community college, you can get work in Psychiatric Facilities which may be more interesting to you, however, the money is usually not that great.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used to work as an auditor and it is quite challenging. However, I am not sure whether it would be best for you as most people there are quite young (i.e. just out of college), there is quite a lot of pressure, and very long hours with limited flexibility (at least at the big accounting firms I am familiar with).

If I was you I would probably try to extend my hours doing what you are doing (even if it isn't thrilling) and find some outside interest that could lead somewhere. I have taken various classes through edx/coursera when not busy. You could do something like that (or online extension classes or extension classes at a local school). It would provide some challenge at comparatively low cost and if you find something you really enjoy you could always work towards a degree in that area.

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are options for 2 year book keeping degrees, 4 year accounting degrees, and in many states adding 1 additional year to get a CPA.  It's a high paying field that's widely available job wise and you already know you like the work.  Contact the local schools around you and check out what programs are around.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To extend your bookkeeping skills you could get a CPA designation and do tax accounting.  That is very intense Feb through April and lighter the rest of the year.  And it pays a lot better than bookkeeping.

Or you could go orthogonal and become a general contractor.  Lots of folks want to hire women contractors and can’t find them.  And it would make it much easier to do the flipping thing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the replies!  The auditing thing sound interesting.  I like going in and "cleaning up things"...I wonder if there are any accounting jobs like that. Tax accounting I could surely do and make more money.. it just sounds so unappealing to me!   My second one-day-a-week job is for a local government entity.  I get so tired and frustrated of millions of tiny rules with no purpose.  That would probably make me crazy with a tax job.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Carol in Cal. said:

Or you could go orthogonal and become a general contractor.  Lots of folks want to hire women contractors and can’t find them.  And it would make it much easier to do the flipping thing.

 

Don't you have to have many many years in the construction field to do that?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can see wanting to flip houses because the pay-off seems large--at least 20-30K per home. To me, it seems risky as a plan to fund your retirement, though, but I don't know much about it and it sounds like you do, or at least you have someone in your life to guide you through the process. Accumulating properties and then renting them out as a stream of retirement income does sound doable, too--would you do both (the flipping and the property rental)? 

As far as your own satisfaction, have you considered using that 1 year of college towards finishing a degree, perhaps in psychology? Most therapists need a Master's, but there is an avenue you could try--Traumatic Incident Reduction is  "theraputic" but not therapy (doesn't require a license or degree to do). I can put you in touch with my dear friend who offers the training. She'd at least be able to tell you what you could do with it. PM your info if you want me to pass it along. She's a licenced clinical social worker, doesn't take insurance, and has a private practice as well as working for the county. I know she makes about $300 to $400 a session. It is highly rewarding, and seems to be very effective for those who are counseled. 

 

Edited by Chris in VA
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, goldberry said:

 

Don't you have to have many many years in the construction field to do that?

Out here you have to have some experience as a handy man, I am not sure how much.  So basically you study, pass some tests, do odd jobs work for a while, and then get your license.  The handy man part can be done very parttime.  I have a friend who did it while working fulltime as a manager in tech.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, Katy said:

There are options for 2 year book keeping degrees, 4 year accounting degrees, and in many states adding 1 additional year to get a CPA.  It's a high paying field that's widely available job wise and you already know you like the work.  Contact the local schools around you and check out what programs are around.

 

And some of the higher level accounting jobs require an MA these days.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, goldberry said:

Part of me says just get those extra bookkeeping hours to make money and stay busy, and forget about growing and challenging.  That seems most "logical" right now given all our circumstances.  But I hate that idea. ☹️

I need a plan for the next five years or so that I can get on board with and feel good about and challenged by.  Suggestions?  Help??

 

 

 

Getting more bookkeeping hours doesn't mean you can never do anything else. Easing the monetary pressure might help you think about options more clearly, and sometimes one job can lead to another one. Going out to work would be preferable to telecommuting for meeting new people, but telecommuting is obviously better for flexibility.

18 hours ago, Selkie said:

If staying with bookkeeping is the most logical choice, can you grow and be challenged outside of work through hobbies or activities? 

My job is pretty tedious much of the time, but I don't mind because it makes good money. Then when I'm not working, I have several pursuits that I love and that keep me very busy and challenged.

 

This was my first thought as well. OP, you like and/or are interested in certain types of healthcare, psychology and counseling, school, writing. Writing is the most flexible one but still has hard deadlines and doesn't tend to pay well, so maybe consider challenging yourself with volunteer work related to those interests. Many libraries have writing groups, many community colleges and rec departments offer courses. Healthcare, you can offer to help staff the booth at health fairs and such; once you get involved with an organization, there are many ways to go. This might help you figure out if you are interested in any healthcare positions that require a 2-yr degree, and you will have started networking. Psychology/counseling related: crisis hotline, mentoring at-risk youth, helping students through the college process. For the latter, Strive for College is one that does online mentoring, which might be good for you. 

Edited by katilac
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

What about getting a real estate agents license?  It would be beneficial when you start flipping houses and save you the commission plus you could list other homes.  

You may get to know some other agents who need someone to do their bookkeeping.  This would allow you to make some additional income as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Love the idea of getting a real estate license. It would allow you to keep your other jobs and get you towards your goal of flipping or having rental income. 

Don't discount other small businesses like dog walking, babysitting, elder care, etc... If you are near an affluent area, you can get a nice hourly wage and keep the flexibility you want. 

In the meantime, keep networking. You never know who might be hiring. You might enjoy bookkeeping more if you worked in a location with actual people. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...