Jump to content

Menu

Anyone doing any prep for Florence?


Recommended Posts

2 minutes ago, whitehawk said:

Can you make bread? I bet there's plenty of flour. And then freeze it until the power goes out, since you won't have preservatives in it.

I didn't think of that - and I have a bread machine, so it wouldn't even be hard. But, I went to Great Harvest Bread Company today and picked up some of their yummy honey whole wheat. I also found peanut butter, jelly, water and shelf stable milk. I remembered to pick up prescriptions and to get cat litter, too! It was a productive morning, I went to four different stores, including the bakery. My dh is getting batteries while he is on a business trip and will bring them tonight.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 143
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Dh and I will be checking food and water supplies this evening.  We're not in the direct path, but we always seem to lose power during these things.  And there's a chance that the basement will

I saw this on facebook yesterday.  I urge all family and friends in the Carolinas And the entire East Coast, to be careful. I can't afford to go to 27 baby showers in April Because

Saw this on FB:

Posted Images

4 hours ago, KarenNC said:

From what I've seen, State and Chapel Hill have already announced closing and encouraged students to leave campus https://www.newsobserver.com/news/local/education/article218155640.html  

The others appear to still be monitoring as of the latest info I have seen. 

 

It would almost make sense to tell places like Asheville and Western to cancel classes, let students who live close-by, go home, so there would be more space for hurricane victims.  My middle son is at Western.  I am far less concerned about him than my son on the coast who is not being evacuated and as of noon today, I can't even get to him since all traffic is only allowed inland.  I know they have busses to evacuate them to Atlanta, but he will struggle with that (15-20 to a classroom on cots and he has Asperger's).  I had hoped that if they decided to evacuate, I could run down there Thur and get him, but that won't be possible.

  • Like 2
  • Sad 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Did folks see that the N&O's paywall is down for Florence coverage. Also WaPo's. Useful to know, I think.

I thought it made sense that UNC and State shut down. Did Duke? The logistical nightmare of the week after it hits is just not good for students - especially young students in high rise dorms who expect the school to feed them. I mean, maybe it won't be bad and maybe power will come back quickly and so forth... but maybe not.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Attolia said:

 

 

Yes, Duke has cancelled classes starting tomorrow.  DD isn't sure she wants to leave for fear she won't be able to get back for class on Monday.  I should just go get her, right?  The 3 hour drive will take like a bazillion hours I am sure ?

I would say yes, if you can. Is that one of the areas where eastbound lanes have been turned into westbound? If so you'll probably need to take back roads. And she probably shouldn't be concerned about Monday classes. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Farrar said:

Did folks see that the N&O's paywall is down for Florence coverage. Also WaPo's. Useful to know, I think.

I thought it made sense that UNC and State shut down. Did Duke? The logistical nightmare of the week after it hits is just not good for students - especially young students in high rise dorms who expect the school to feed them. I mean, maybe it won't be bad and maybe power will come back quickly and so forth... but maybe not.

 

 

Duke isn't shutting down, per se, but they did just make the call this morning to cancel all classes after 5PM tomorrow through Saturday evening as a precaution.  This leaves me in the dilemma of whether to get DD.  She is afraid of not making it back for classes (all Duke students fear this because, well, they are Duke students and missing class is an atrocious concept ?).  I can tell she is torn.  The traffic tomorrow evening will are horrid.  Like I am told to expect that 3 hour drive to take as much as 10-12.  

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Lady Florida. said:

I would say yes, if you can. Is that one of the areas where eastbound lanes have been turned into westbound? If so you'll probably need to take back roads. And she probably shouldn't be concerned about Monday classes. 

 

 

85 is a major, major interstate.  I can't imagine that they will turn lanes.  My sister lives in Charleston and they have turned the lanes there.  But here, not right on the coast and such a major run between Charlotte and Raleigh, I don't think they would ever do that ?‍♀️

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Attolia said:

 

 

85 is a major, major interstate.  I can't imagine that they will turn lanes.  My sister lives in Charleston and they have turned the lanes there.  But here, not right on the coast and such a major run between Charlotte and Raleigh, I don't think they would ever do that ?‍♀️

Agreed - that would be nuts. You wouldn’t be able to get from RDU to Greensboro and Charlotte and back. No one could commute.

They could make 40 one way between the eastern edge of Raleigh and Wilmington, I guess. Or just from where it meets 95 to Wilmington. But it’s not set up that way at all. I assume they have turned 64 coming from the Virginia coast.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Farrar said:

Agreed - that would be nuts. You wouldn’t be able to get from RDU to Greensboro and Charlotte and back. No one could commute.

They could make 40 one way between the eastern edge of Raleigh and Wilmington, I guess. Or just from where it meets 95 to Wilmington. But it’s not set up that way at all. I assume they have turned 64 coming from the Virginia coast.

 

 

I think they only turn the highways that lead straight to the coast and only for some miles, right?  I can't imagine they would even consider turning 85 or 40 ?  That would be nuts.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Our electric company just reminded us regarding boil water notices.

"If a boil water advisory is issued for your neighborhood and there is no power to boil water, add 16 drops of fragrance-free chlorine bleach per gallon of water to purify it, then let it sit for 30 minutes before drinking."

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, Farrar said:

Agreed - that would be nuts. You wouldn’t be able to get from RDU to Greensboro and Charlotte and back. No one could commute.

They could make 40 one way between the eastern edge of Raleigh and Wilmington, I guess. Or just from where it meets 95 to Wilmington. But it’s not set up that way at all. I assume they have turned 64 coming from the Virginia coast.

 

It hasn't started on 64 yet... dh said they'll send him home from work as soon as it's announced. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Attolia said:

 

 

I think they only turn the highways that lead straight to the coast and only for some miles, right?  I can't imagine they would even consider turning 85 or 40 ?  That would be nuts.

 

On 64, it's from Hampton to the outskirts of Richmond. 60-70 miles. But it hasn't been enacted at this point. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, Attolia said:

 

 

I think they only turn the highways that lead straight to the coast and only for some miles, right?  I can't imagine they would even consider turning 85 or 40 ?  That would be nuts.

I mean, there's NOTHING between Wilmington and where 40 and 95 intersect and that's a solid hour away from the coast, so not that close. Nothing but pigs and tobacco. There's no reason they couldn't make it one way right now. I mean, who the heck is going from eastern NC TOWARDS the coast right now? No one should be doing that except maybe some emergency personnel and trucks getting in place. They can be the only vehicles driving east on the local highways. But it's not set up to do it. I mean I-64 is a giant, important road as well, but it's specifically set up for evacuations - there are these gates that go down over the entrances and exits to the highway. But maybe that's because it's more likely to flood up the Chesapeake Bay than it is into the flat parts of NC?

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sure this is too late for this round, but for those of you who live in the area where you could see hurricane activity in the future, a friend of mine in Florida highly recommends this Family Lifestraw System.  

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FM9OBQS/ref=asc_df_B00FM9OBQS5608745?tag=shopz0d-20&ascsubtag=shopzilla_mp_1226-20&15366894924011459444210090301008005&creative=395261&creativeASIN=B00FM9OBQS&linkCode=asn

She says it truly makes the most disgusting water drinkable, and their family could last a long time on the water with one of these if needs be, 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Farrar said:

Agreed - that would be nuts. You wouldn’t be able to get from RDU to Greensboro and Charlotte and back. No one could commute.

They could make 40 one way between the eastern edge of Raleigh and Wilmington, I guess. Or just from where it meets 95 to Wilmington. But it’s not set up that way at all. I assume they have turned 64 coming from the Virginia coast.

NCDOT has already announced that they will not be turning I40 from Wilmington to Raleigh one way. Apparently NCSU did a study showing that it some how makes traffic slower. Honestly that makes no sense to me but that's the policy. I would guess that that is the main reason there is no mandatory evacuation in New Hanover County/Wilmington (except for the beaches and low lying flood prone areas). I don't think they could get everyone off the coast.    

Edited by hshibley
spelling
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Latest forecast is favorable to us. Local hotels are filled with people from the coast. Not a scrap of bread or ounce of water to be seen in stores. Don't even think about gas...

My kids are getting in on the action, too. Between school and the radio they're getting a lot of questionable stuff put into their minds. I mean, we're 4+ hours from the coast, but they got it into their heads that we need to evacuate (which would be hands-down dangerous. Our house is in the safest area, locally). They've started a hurricane kit, which is a craft bin filled with mac and cheese, bottles of water, painter's tape (the only kind I let them have because it doesn't ruin things), a beeswax candle from a Valentine's Day candle kit, and a flashlight. Middle child keeps adding more mac and cheese every time we turn our backs. I asked him if he was feeling worried. He said in a deadpan voice "I'm not worried, Mom. I'm just doing all this stuff because I don't want us to die." Awww, poor buddy. I'm doing my best to keep this whole thing realistic for them.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

With the new turns, we are leaving dd in Durham.  Her dorm is built like a bunker and they never lose power or water (underground grid).  I am so glad I talked my sister into heading here yesterday.  She lives in Charleston and was convinced she was ok, even with the mandatory evacuation, but with the southward turn she is thankful she came.  I have no idea what to expect in Charlotte?  If it stalls and turns south more, just lots of rain?

Edited by Attolia
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, lavender's green said:

Latest forecast is favorable to us. Local hotels are filled with people from the coast. Not a scrap of bread or ounce of water to be seen in stores. Don't even think about gas...

My kids are getting in on the action, too. Between school and the radio they're getting a lot of questionable stuff put into their minds. I mean, we're 4+ hours from the coast, but they got it into their heads that we need to evacuate (which would be hands-down dangerous. Our house is in the safest area, locally). They've started a hurricane kit, which is a craft bin filled with mac and cheese, bottles of water, painter's tape (the only kind I let them have because it doesn't ruin things), a beeswax candle from a Valentine's Day candle kit, and a flashlight. Middle child keeps adding more mac and cheese every time we turn our backs. I asked him if he was feeling worried. He said in a deadpan voice "I'm not worried, Mom. I'm just doing all this stuff because I don't want us to die." Awww, poor buddy. I'm doing my best to keep this whole thing realistic for them.

Oh, (((hugs))) to them!
Sometimes I get my kids a little too worked up, but mostly we've done enough emergency prep learnin' that they're pretty darn calm when there are actual risks. I think my kids, much like me, worry less when they feel some sense of control in taking precautions.  But, in this case, maybe showing them the actual maps and what not can calm them down a bit?  My youngest two love that they have access to Weather Bug on their devices, and take great pride in keeping us informed of the radar status, lol.  

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Carrie12345 said:

Oh, (((hugs))) to them!
Sometimes I get my kids a little too worked up, but mostly we've done enough emergency prep learnin' that they're pretty darn calm when there are actual risks. I think my kids, much like me, worry less when they feel some sense of control in taking precautions.  But, in this case, maybe showing them the actual maps and what not can calm them down a bit?  My youngest two love that they have access to Weather Bug on their devices, and take great pride in keeping us informed of the radar status, lol.  

I'll check out Weather Bug, thanks for the tip! The kid who's most worried just turned 5, so he doesn't have a great sense of distance/proportion/maps yet. He does like watching the radar, though. I'll try to connect what he sees on the screen with what's going on outside for him.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, lavender's green said:

I'll check out Weather Bug, thanks for the tip! The kid who's most worried just turned 5, so he doesn't have a great sense of distance/proportion/maps yet. He does like watching the radar, though. I'll try to connect what he sees on the screen with what's going on outside for him.

Fortunately I've been able to keep my 6yo in the dark as to what's going on. They've been out of school since Monday and I've let her play video games and watch her favorite youtubers while we prep. We live in the area that is supposed to be most impacted by the hurricane. I am worried about sitting in the dark with her with the roar of the storm overhead for several days ??. It's definitely tough with little ones.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, lavender's green said:

I'll check out Weather Bug, thanks for the tip! The kid who's most worried just turned 5, so he doesn't have a great sense of distance/proportion/maps yet. He does like watching the radar, though. I'll try to connect what he sees on the screen with what's going on outside for him.

I don't think mine (7 and 11) are all that map savvy in general either, but you can stick multiple pins in Weather Bug, which might add a little perspective.  Grandma's town, the local park, favorite vacation spot... (or their closest weather station, at least) to add some near/far markers.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to add a bit of (my weird sense of) humor, my youngest may feel a bit TOO much in control.  A year or two ago, he told us that, if our house falls down, he'll just live in the woods and survive on bear meat and wild blueberries.  (He has never been hunting, and I'm still unsure why he'd choose bear over the less dangerous and more plentiful deer.)

  • Like 3
  • Haha 7
Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a list copied and pasted from our local Florida weatherman.  I think most of these ideas have been discussed, but I’m sharing anyway. 

For our family and friends in the Carolinas, this is a list that many people are finding helpful.

1. Charge any device that provides light. Laptops, tablets, cameras, video cameras, and old phones. Old cell phones can still used for dialing 911. Charge external battery back ups. ( Glow sticks also provide light for a few hours. Stand them upright in a glass or jar to make a lantern.)
2. Wash all trash cans, big and small, and fill with water for flushing toilets. Line outdoor trash cans with trash bags, fill with water and store in the garage. Add bleach to sterilize. 
3. Fill every tub and sink with water. Cover sinks with Saran Wrap to keep it from collecting dust. Fill washing machine and leave lid up to store water.
4. Fill old empty water bottles and other containers with water and keep near sinks for washing hands. 
5. Fill every Tupperware with water and store in freezer. These will help keep food cold longer and serve as a back up water supply. 
6. Fill drinking cups with water and cover with Saran Wrap. Store as many as possible in fridge. The rest you can store on the counter and use first before any water bottles are opened. Ice is impossible to find after the storm.
7. Reserve fridge space for storing tap water and keep the sealed water bottles on the counter. 
8. Cook any meats in advance and other perishable foods. You can freeze cooked food. Hard boil eggs for snacks for first day without power. 
9. Be well hydrated before the storm hits and avoid salty foods that make you dehydrated. 
10. Wash all dirty clothes and bed sheets. Anything dirty will smell without the A/C, you may need the items, and with no A/C, you'll be sweating a lot. You're going to want clean sheets. 
11. Toss out any expiring food, clean cat litter boxes, empty all trash cans in the house, including bathrooms. Remove anything that will cause an odor when the A/C is off. If you don't have a trash day pickup before the storm, find a dumpster. 
12. Bring in any yard decor, secure anything that will fly around, secure gates, bring in hoses, potted plants, etc. Bring in patio furniture and grills. 
13. Clean your environment so you have clear, easy escape routes. Even if that means temporarily moving furniture to one area. 
14. Scrub all bathrooms so you are starting with a clean odor free environment. Store water filled trash cans next to each toilet for flushing. 
15. Place everything you own that is important and necessary in a backpack or small file box that is easy to grab. Include your wallet with ID, phone, hand sanitizer, snacks, etc. Get plastic sleeves for important documents.
16. Make sure you have cash on hand.
17. Stock up on pet food and fill up bowls of water for pets. 
18. Refill any medications. Most insurance companies allow for 2 emergency refills per year.
19. Fill your propane tanks. You can heat soup cans, boil water, make coffee, and other stuff besides just grilling meat. Get an extra, if possible.
20. Drop your A/C in advance and lower temperatures in your fridges. 
21. Gather all candles, flashlights, lighters, matches, batteries, and other items and keep them accessible. 
22. Clean all counters in advance. Start with a clean surface. Buy Clorox Wipes for cleaning when there is no power. Mop your floors and vacuum. If power is out for 10 days, you'll have to live in the mess you started with. 
23. Pick your emergency safe place such as a closet under the stairs. Store the items you'll need in that location for the brunt of the storm. Make a hand fan for when the power is out. 
24. Shower just before the storm is scheduled to hit. 
25. Keep baby wipes next to each toilet. Don't flush them. It's not the time to risk clogging your toilet!
26. Run your dishwasher, don't risk having dirty smelly dishes and you need every container for water! Remember you'll need clean water for brushing your teeth, washing yourself, and cleaning your hands. 
27. Put a small suitcase in your car in case you decide to evacuate. Also put at least one jug of water in your car. It will still be there if you don't evacuate! You don't need to store all water in the house. Remember to pack for pets as well. 
28. Check on all family members, set up emergency back up plans, and check on elderly neighbors. 
29. Remember, pets are family too. Take them with you!
30. Before the storm, unplug all electronics. There will be power surges during and after the storm.
31. Gas up your car and have a spare gas container for your generator or your car when you run out.
32 . Use plastic cups and paper plates. ?  You need water to wash dishes....?
33 . Also if you run out of water tap your hot water heater it can have up to 30 gallons stored in there.
34 . Put water in balloons and store in freezer.
35 . If it's yellow let it mellow, if it's brown Flush it down!?

If you can, take a video of your house and contents....walk room to room--open cabinets/drawers and closets.  This will help if you need to make a claim later.  It will show proof of items and help you list all the items (help your memory, so you don't forget anything)...I highly recommend!!!

I also heard you should freeze a cup of water, place a coin on top after it is frozen...keep this in your freezer to help you gauge the temperature if the power goes out.  If the coin stays on top, the food is staying frozen.  If the coin falls into the water, the freezer thawed out and most food will likely need to be thrown away.  This is super helpful is you have to leave and come back, as it may appear everything is still frozen, but if the coin is in the cup--you will know!!

Finally, anything that you want to try and preserve, but you can't take with you---place it in a plastic bin and put in your dishwasher, lock the door---this should make it water tight in case of any water intrusion into your home.  But of course, take all the important/irreplaceable items you can!!

  • Like 8
Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a reminder for those with little ones in the house: Bathtubs, buckets, and other deep containers filled with water can be a drowning hazard. Drowning happens quickly, often when adults are preoccupied with something else. Take care that in preparing for one life-threatening event, that you don't bring on a different one. 

Also, even for those on the outskirts of the hurricane, remember it may spawn tornadoes. Many tornado-related deaths happen at night. If you are in a tornado-prevalent area near the hurricane's swath, you may want to carefully consider sleeping arrangements for the next few days. Sleeping in or near your home's safe zone might be advisable for those at risk for trees falling and other hazards. An impromptu family slumber party complete with ghost stories, games, flashlights, and yummy snacks and drinks nearby might be a fun way to approach a change in bedtime routines. 

Obviously every situation is different. Risk levels will vary considerably. Stay alert, stay informed, stay safe, but also stay sane!

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

It looks like it will weaken which is a good thing but the stalling might be a problem with flooding. It sounds like what Frances did in 2004. It was a huge and terrifying storm, which I think reached a strong Cat 4 at one point. It weakened but also slowed down and stayed for what seemed like days. The fact that it stayed so long is what brought damage. Kennedy Space Center's Vehicle Assembly Building took a pretty bad hit and it almost never gets damaged. Flooding was a big issue too due to it just sitting there for so long.

So my point is, don't let your guard down. A slow moving, large storm, even when not as strong can do a significant amount of damage. 

1 hour ago, lavender's green said:

Latest forecast is favorable to us. Local hotels are filled with people from the coast. Not a scrap of bread or ounce of water to be seen in stores. Don't even think about gas...

My kids are getting in on the action, too. Between school and the radio they're getting a lot of questionable stuff put into their minds. I mean, we're 4+ hours from the coast, but they got it into their heads that we need to evacuate (which would be hands-down dangerous. Our house is in the safest area, locally). They've started a hurricane kit, which is a craft bin filled with mac and cheese, bottles of water, painter's tape (the only kind I let them have because it doesn't ruin things), a beeswax candle from a Valentine's Day candle kit, and a flashlight. Middle child keeps adding more mac and cheese every time we turn our backs. I asked him if he was feeling worried. He said in a deadpan voice "I'm not worried, Mom. I'm just doing all this stuff because I don't want us to die." Awww, poor buddy. I'm doing my best to keep this whole thing realistic for them.

Aww, poor kids. (((hugs)))

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to play devil's advocate a bit on the water--if you have municipal water (vs. a well), you can wait until the power goes out before deciding if you want to fill a bathtub.

I had a friend fill her tub for a previous storm (Matthew?) and during the night it failed somehow. It ruined her floor and furnishings in the room below, the only damage she experienced.

 

We were lucky to have our trash/recycling/compost pickup timed perfectly for this one. I agree about catching up on all the cleaning, laundry, etc.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

DH waited in the lines yesterday for gas, so I can check that off the list. He also bought a tiny charcoal grill so we have that if needed.

Brownies baked this morning...check. 

All bedding freshly laundered (in case the power goes out and we're hot and stinky...at least the beds will smell nice). 

Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Pawz4me said:

I prefer to get my info directly from the National Hurricane Center website. These are the folks actually flying into hurricanes regularly, taking all the readings and providing other weather sites with info. Here is their latest rainfall potential estimate.

Yes and no. I like listening to our local meteorologists, especially if they've been here any decent length of time. In fact, it was local forecasters who broke with the NHC and said Charley was going to hit Port Charlotte. The NHC eventually did say that's where it would make landfall but if people had been listening (and trusting) their local meteorologists they would have had more time. Most everyone I know watches local news and weather when a hurricane is expected to hit.

17 minutes ago, whitehawk said:

Just to play devil's advocate a bit on the water--if you have municipal water (vs. a well), you can wait until the power goes out before deciding if you want to fill a bathtub.

I had a friend fill her tub for a previous storm (Matthew?) and during the night it failed somehow. It ruined her floor and furnishings in the room below, the only damage she experienced.

 

Yes, this. We've been fortunate to never have a water issue so we haven't needed it, but since the bathtub water isn't for drinking anyway you don't need to to it before the storm. Never drink that water, get or store your own drinking water in containers. 

16 minutes ago, alisoncooks said:

 

Brownies baked this morning...check. 

All bedding freshly laundered (in case the power goes out and we're hot and stinky...at least the beds will smell nice). 

Clean laundry and hurricane snacks are very important. ? 

Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, Woodland Mist Academy said:

Just a reminder for those with little ones in the house: Bathtubs, buckets, and other deep containers filled with water can be a drowning hazard. Drowning happens quickly, often when adults are preoccupied with something else. Take care that in preparing for one life-threatening event, that you don't bring on a different one. 

Also, even for those on the outskirts of the hurricane, remember it may spawn tornadoes. Many tornado-related deaths happen at night. If you are in a tornado-prevalent area near the hurricane's swath, you may want to carefully consider sleeping arrangements for the next few days. Sleeping in or near your home's safe zone might be advisable for those at risk for trees falling and other hazards. An impromptu family slumber party complete with ghost stories, games, flashlights, and yummy snacks and drinks nearby might be a fun way to approach a change in bedtime routines. 

Obviously every situation is different. Risk levels will vary considerably. Stay alert, stay informed, stay safe, but also stay sane!

Instead of filling the bathtub, I like to fill the washer.  The kids have limited access to the laundry room and the washer is taller and has a lid.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hoggirl, that is a great list.  Very thourough.

Let me add in one thing - if you are used to having coffee in the morning (and need it to function, LOL) make sure you have instant coffee and a way to heat up water (a burner attachment on your grill, a metal coffee pot made for using on a grill, etc).  Trust me when I say that first AM you will be glad you did.

My kids are older but my younger one gets very nervous and worked up about weather.  When we went through Irma last year we tried to make the actual hurricane passing over us as "fun" as possible - all of us (my parents were here too) sleeping on blow up mattresses or the pullout sofa in one room together, junk food galore, playing poker by candlelight, etc.  

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Pink and Green Mom said:

Hoggirl, that is a great list.  Very thourough.

Let me add in one thing - if you are used to having coffee in the morning (and need it to function, LOL) make sure you have instant coffee and a way to heat up water (a burner attachment on your grill, a metal coffee pot made for using on a grill, etc).  Trust me when I say that first AM you will be glad you did.

My kids are older but my younger one gets very nervous and worked up about weather.  When we went through Irma last year we tried to make the actual hurricane passing over us as "fun" as possible - all of us (my parents were here too) sleeping on blow up mattresses or the pullout sofa in one room together, junk food galore, playing poker by candlelight, etc.  

 

 

Or a French press is always my fall back plan.  We have a camp stove to heat water ? 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, Lady Florida. said:

Yes and no. I like listening to our local meteorologists, especially if they've been here any decent length of time. In fact, it was local forecasters who broke with the NHC and said Charley was going to hit Port Charlotte. The NHC eventually did say that's where it would make landfall but if people had been listening (and trusting) their local meteorologists they would have had more time. Most everyone I know watches local news and weather when a hurricane is expected to hit.

Oh absolutely. I kind of assumed that was so common sensical (yeah, I know, not really a word but it should be) that it didn't/shouldn't need saying. ? But maybe I give people too much credit.

Local is good to great for tweaking. But when it comes to hurricanes I'm getting the big picture info right from the source, which is the National Hurricane Center, versus relying on Weather Bug or any of the other weather services.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Pawz4me said:

Oh absolutely. I kind of assumed that was so common sensical (yeah, I know, not really a word but it should be) that it didn't/shouldn't need saying. ? But maybe I give people too much credit.

Local is good to great for tweaking. But when it comes to hurricanes I'm getting the big picture info right from the source, which is the National Hurricane Center, versus relying on Weather Bug or any of the other weather services.

To be clear, I mentioned Weather Bug for kids’ peace of mind, not for adults to make life or death decisions!

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Attolia said:

 

 

Or a French press is always my fall back plan.  We have a camp stove to heat water ? 

 

Just don’t forget to grind the beans in advance, if you use a grinder normally!

 

We also have pourover cold brew.

 

And I might grab a few large bottles of Starbucks cold brew, unsweetened, just in case.

 

Serious coffee addict here.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Carrie12345 said:

To be clear, I mentioned Weather Bug for kids’ peace of mind, not for adults to make life or death decisions!

I didn't think you were! I just used that as an example because it was right in front of me. I know there are about a zillion sources/websites/apps now and everybody thinks their chosen one is the best. But I'm pretty sure when it comes to hurricanes they're all getting their info from the government.

Edited by Pawz4me
Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, Pink and Green Mom said:

Let me add in one thing - if you are used to having coffee in the morning (and need it to function, LOL) make sure you have instant coffee and a way to heat up water (a burner attachment on your grill, a metal coffee pot made for using on a grill, etc).  Trust me when I say that first AM you will be glad you did.

French press with real coffee beats the instant stuff. There are even plastic versions for backpacking

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Spryte said:

 

Just don’t forget to grind the beans in advance, if you use a grinder normally!

 

We also have pourover cold brew.

 

And I might grab a few large bottles of Starbucks cold brew, unsweetened, just in case.

 

Serious coffee addict here.

 

6 minutes ago, regentrude said:

French press with real coffee beats the instant stuff. There are even plastic versions for backpacking

 

 

Yes, while everyone else stocks bread and milk here before storms, I stock coffee creamer...true story.  

 

ETA - and my family supports this idea.  The only thing worse than being stuck in a storm with no power and no water (we have a well) is to be stuck with a coffee deprived me in that situation ?

Edited by Attolia
  • Like 4
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, regentrude said:

French press with real coffee beats the instant stuff. There are even plastic versions for backpacking

Dang, someone gave me a French press and I have no idea what to do with it (we have a keurig and that is how I have my coffee daily).  I wish I had known to use that instead of instant, which I agree is gross.  Now I know for next time...

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Pink and Green Mom said:

Dang, someone gave me a French press and I have no idea what to do with it (we have a keurig and that is how I have my coffee daily).  I wish I had known to use that instead of instant, which I agree is gross.  Now I know for next time...

 

 

I stock pile k cups ?  And, yes, I have thought through a power outage.  Just pull them apart and dump them in a French press.  Seriously, a girl has to do what a girl has to do.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Attolia said:

 

 

I stock pile k cups ?  And, yes, I have thought through a power outage.  Just pull them apart and dump them in a French press.  Seriously, a girl has to do what a girl has to do.

Brilliant.  I stockpile vodka and beer ?  And chips and Reeses peanut butter cups...actually that last part is a lie.  I ate my vat of chips and peanut butter cups well in advance of the hurricane.  By the time Irma arrived I was eating everyone else's comfort food.

Edited by Pink and Green Mom
  • Like 1
  • Haha 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Pink and Green Mom said:

Dang, someone gave me a French press and I have no idea what to do with it (we have a keurig and that is how I have my coffee daily).  I wish I had known to use that instead of instant, which I agree is gross.  Now I know for next time...

 

11 minutes ago, regentrude said:

French press with real coffee beats the instant stuff. There are even plastic versions for backpacking

 

27 minutes ago, Spryte said:

 

Just don’t forget to grind the beans in advance, if you use a grinder normally!

 

We also have pourover cold brew.

 

And I might grab a few large bottles of Starbucks cold brew, unsweetened, just in case.

 

Serious coffee addict here.

 

 

 

And then, if all else fails...

 

 

 

  • Like 3
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, regentrude said:

French press with real coffee beats the instant stuff. There are even plastic versions for backpacking

We don't typically use the French press but keep it around for power outages.  We try to remember to grind some beans ahead of time in stormy weather (my husband prefers to grind the beans right before he makes the coffee) but once we forgot and he used a mortar and pestle.  We have a gas grill with a burner, so we can heat water outside.  Last winter we bought a butane burner and a cartridge of gas so we wouldn't have to brave a blizzard or thunderstorm to get some water heated. We haven't had an opportunity to use it yet. Now that we have it, our power will probably never go out again... :-)

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...