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What standard should teachers be held to vs. general public?


DawnM
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I have read about teachers getting fired for posting sexy photos online (one taught pole dancing classes, one was in a string bikini drinking out of a beer bong thing partying, etc...) none of which was illegal, just what the district considered inappropriate.

And now I am reading about two teachers, both convicted of crimes before they started teaching.  One was domestic assault and the other was convicted of prostitution.  And they are allowed to teach.

And then there is everything in between (drunk driving, etc....)

What would you "line in the sand" be?  Or, do you think teachers/educators should be held to a higher standard than any other jobs/careers?  Does it matter if it is legal or illegal to you?  Why?

Just things I have been pondering today.

 

PS:  I didn't specify, but I was thinking of Public School.  I assume private schools can set whatever standard they wish.

Edited by DawnM
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I think teachers should be held to a high professional standard of conduct in the classroom and in interactions with students. Their private lives should be their own. I also don't think criminal history having nothing to do with children, especially if it's old history, should preclude teacher licensing or employment.

Edited by Ravin
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I think if it's a private school, parents may vote with their pocketbook if they find out the teachers are outwardly immoral or irresponsible in certain respects.  I think that teachers need to be mature enough to recognize that and not post stuff that will have parents after their heads.

Public school teachers should probably have some more leeway, but I still think there is a line, and that line is somewhere north of illegal. Kids do need to have some respect for their teachers, which isn't going to happen if the teachers' behavior is less responsible than we would expect of an 18yo student.

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I think it makes a difference if it's a private religious school vs. a public school. I believe that religious schools can and should enforce codes of conduct for their employees that would be illegal for a public school to enforce. Being a religious school teacher is about more than just teaching academics- it's also imparting religious values and if a teacher does something in his/her private life that violates those values, then he/she deserves to be fired for it.

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I don’t think convicted felons should ever be able to teach children. Yes, they might be reformed, but sometimes we have to live with the consequences of our past decisions. 

As far as social media, displaying sound judgement is part of being an employee. You can post whatever you want, but you better have your page locked down in such a way that it doesn’t bite you in the ass. 

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I don't know.  I'd like teachers not to be doing crimes while they are teaching AND I would like schools to have open security cameras where parents/admin can log in and watch what is going on to prevent abuse in the classroom. 
As far as previous convictions, I've seen the penal system create perpetual felons.  Once a person does their time they're unable to get a job because people won't hire them, which has them turn to more illegal endeavors.  It seems to be a vicious circle.  But......I don't know.  I think it would depend on the crime.  DS's principal had a hidden record of alcoholism and while he was a decent principal at school, his binge winding his way across town with a fifth of vodka in his system made it hard to talk to the high schoolers he was leading.  On one hand, there was a great conversation about alcoholism, its signs, and its effects on others.  On the other, watching their principal get a DUI that stunned the town was a little more than they needed.
So, I just don't know.  I think we're moving towards a society that forgets people are human and make mistakes, and we have a penal system that needs a huge overhaul to make it effective.  But I don't have a problem with a teacher who has a past but has changed direction AND is good at what they do.

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With regard to crimes, I think what the crime was and how long ago matter. A dumb decision a decade ago that did not involve any risk to children or extreme ethical egregiousness doesn't worry me. It would depend on the crime; petty theft? Not a big deal. Animal torture? That's a never. Anything recent might be a problem because I don't know that the person has learned to make wiser choices and I don't want someone with seriously poor judgement teaching kids.

Religious school? Expected standards should be in the contract and the teacher should follow them. 

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4 minutes ago, happysmileylady said:

I think the problem with this 

would be that you would have parents watching the cams all the time and critiquing every action of the teacher.  Meaning....."Principle Smith, I want to talk to you about the way Mrs Johnson taught math today.  She was drawing the shapes on the board, wouldn't it be better if every student had shape blocks?"  And so on and so on.  Imagine you get one parent, per classroom, per day, in a K-5 school with 3 classrooms per grade.  And then having to respond to all 18 complaints every day, and sort through them all to find the one instance that might be abuse........

 

I just can't see placing that on a school principle or resource officer.  

It's also a privacy issue for all the kids in the class. 

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1 minute ago, happysmileylady said:

I think the problem with this 

would be that you would have parents watching the cams all the time and critiquing every action of the teacher.  Meaning....."Principle Smith, I want to talk to you about the way Mrs Johnson taught math today.  She was drawing the shapes on the board, wouldn't it be better if every student had shape blocks?"  And so on and so on.  Imagine you get one parent, per classroom, per day, in a K-5 school with 3 classrooms per grade.  And then having to respond to all 18 complaints every day, and sort through them all to find the one instance that might be abuse........

 

I just can't see placing that on a school principle or resource officer.  


Nobody believed 30 kids making complaints daily that our teacher was throwing things at us and screaming like a banshee.  Every time an adult came close to our windows/door, she'd act nice as pie.  She damaged us in more ways than I can count.

I'm okay with cameras for my kid's safety.  I'm more than okay with them in special ed classrooms especially.  Even if you think that means that parents would have nothing to do all day but watch a security camera every day and make artificial complaints.

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30 minutes ago, HomeAgain said:


Nobody believed 30 kids making complaints daily that our teacher was throwing things at us and screaming like a banshee.  Every time an adult came close to our windows/door, she'd act nice as pie.  She damaged us in more ways than I can count.

I'm okay with cameras for my kid's safety.  I'm more than okay with them in special ed classrooms especially.  Even if you think that means that parents would have nothing to do all day but watch a security camera every day and make artificial complaints.

So all the kids told their parents and not one parent believed enough to go to the principal?

what year was this? what grade? how long was the teacher at that school?

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8 minutes ago, unsinkable said:

So all the kids told their parents and not one parent believed enough to go to the principal?

what year was this? what grade? how long was the teacher at that school?

Oh.......no.....no, no, no.
It was 7th grade.  We ALL told our parents.  We ALL filled out multiple complaint forms until the teacher's file was inches thick.  The administration thought she was fine and kept her on.  It was only when she hauled me and my friend into the principal's office and threatened to sue us (my mom was close enough to make it over and a secretary called her.  My friend's mom was not)...it was only then, when she was threatening to sue us for circulating a petition to get her removed and bringing her bad behavior in front of the principal that she was, in fact, allowed to finish out her year and then be moved to a different school in the district, which gave us a 1st grade teacher for 8th grade math.  My mother stood behind me and steadied me while the teacher raved and the principal had the audacity to look surprised.

Yeah, every school should have cameras.  Someone needs to look out for kids.  I cannot even imagine if this had been present day and she had had access to "calming rooms" that are really solitary confinement for students.

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3 hours ago, SKL said:

I think if it's a private school, parents may vote with their pocketbook if they find out the teachers are outwardly immoral or irresponsible in certain respects.  I think that teachers need to be mature enough to recognize that and not post stuff that will have parents after their heads.

Public school teachers should probably have some more leeway, but I still think there is a line, and that line is somewhere north of illegal. Kids do need to have some respect for their teachers, which isn't going to happen if the teachers' behavior is less responsible than we would expect of an 18yo student.

 

Agreed. I would think respect for a teacher is greatly diminished when photos surface on Social Media sites that show the person making inappropriate choices. After all, they are supposed to be teaching and that would include teaching by example.

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23 minutes ago, HomeAgain said:

Oh.......no.....no, no, no.
It was 7th grade.  We ALL told our parents.  We ALL filled out multiple complaint forms until the teacher's file was inches thick.  The administration thought she was fine and kept her on.  It was only when she hauled me and my friend into the principal's office and threatened to sue us (my mom was close enough to make it over and a secretary called her.  My friend's mom was not)...it was only then, when she was threatening to sue us for circulating a petition to get her removed and bringing her bad behavior in front of the principal that she was, in fact, allowed to finish out her year and then be moved to a different school in the district, which gave us a 1st grade teacher for 8th grade math.  My mother stood behind me and steadied me while the teacher raved and the principal had the audacity to look surprised.

Yeah, every school should have cameras.  Someone needs to look out for kids.  I cannot even imagine if this had been present day and she had had access to "calming rooms" that are really solitary confinement for students.

Well, thank goodness parents stood up for your class. That would have been more awful if none of them did.

 

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Private schools can define their own policies. A few examples I've heard about for Christian schools: you cannot drink alcohol in any situation where a student or parent might see you, you must be in faithful fellowship at a local church, you should not friend your students on Facebook, and you must report any arrest or court date for other than a minor traffic violation.

I've never heard of anything like that for public school. As a matter of personal practice, I follow the Facebook policy even for college students that I teach.

Edited by G5052
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1 hour ago, HomeAgain said:


Nobody believed 30 kids making complaints daily that our teacher was throwing things at us and screaming like a banshee.  Every time an adult came close to our windows/door, she'd act nice as pie.  She damaged us in more ways than I can count.

I'm okay with cameras for my kid's safety.  I'm more than okay with them in special ed classrooms especially.  Even if you think that means that parents would have nothing to do all day but watch a security camera every day and make artificial complaints.

Maybe a compromise could be body cam where the data is only accessed when a complaint is made

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1 hour ago, Ausmumof3 said:

Maybe a compromise could be body cam where the data is only accessed when a complaint is made

Yeah, obviously the choice isn't between a feed that any parent has access to any time over the internet where you have to worry about the security of it and no recording at all. 

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1 hour ago, happysmileylady said:

I do believe that all teachers at a private religious school should be members of that faith.  

I've taught at a religious school that I was not, at the time, a member of that faith.

I think this is totally dependant on the religion and the school. Basically, there are lots of reasons why religious schools hire teachers for, say, math or Spanish or a million other things, that are not of their faith. It should be up to the school.

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1 hour ago, happysmileylady said:

I do believe that all teachers at a private religious school should be members of that faith.  

At our local Muslim school, we have mainly Muslim teachers, but also Christian teachers.  The school puts a priority of being a state licensed teacher and a good teacher over being a Muslim.  The ideal world is both--but if the choice is between an unlicensed Muslim or a licensed Christian or Jewish teacher....they will take the non-Muslim.  For the non-Muslim teachers, they do not have to wear hijab, but they do need to dress modestly.  They are also expected to not bring pork products (or alcohol, but less of an issue) in their lunches that they eat with kids.

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55 minutes ago, happysmileylady said:

Should a second grade student come to his regular teacher and ask questions about the sacraments of his faith, his teacher, as a person employed by his faith, should be able to answer that within the bounds of that faith and be able to do so without feelings or guilt or withholding info, etc.   A Baptist teacher, at a Catholic school is unlikely to be able to answer questions about why priests can't marry, without betraying some religious bias.  

 

As a non-Catholic teacher in a Catholic school, I don't have issues with questions like that.  I can answer a question with "The Catholic church teaches that . . . ".  If my students ask me "What do you think?",  I can turn it around on them, or tell them that my denomination teaches something different, or say "That's a great conversation to have with your parents" or whatever.  It depends on the issue.  

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51 minutes ago, happysmileylady said:

So, a question....if a Muslim child asks a...say, Catholic teacher....why Muslim women wear a hijab, in  a Muslim school, how to you expect that teacher to answer?

 

Why wouldn't a Catholic teacher teaching in a Muslim school know the answer to that?  

 

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18 minutes ago, Daria said:

 

Why wouldn't a Catholic teacher teaching in a Muslim school know the answer to that?  

 

And if they don't know, they can say: "let's go ask Ms. X to answer that question" or any number of other acceptable responses.

I would expect a teacher at a religious school to avoid undermining the religion, and to follow whatever conduct code the school asks them to.

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We had a high school teacher who had a side job posing on a porn site. The photos were found by teen boys at the high school and before long the pictures had been shared all over the school. The teacher was "encouraged" to resign and she did. I think it would have been very hard for her to maintain a professional relationship with her students after that. 

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1 hour ago, happysmileylady said:

Should a second grade student come to his regular teacher and ask questions about the sacraments of his faith, his teacher, as a person employed by his faith, should be able to answer that within the bounds of that faith and be able to do so without feelings or guilt or withholding info, etc.   A Baptist teacher, at a Catholic school is unlikely to be able to answer questions about why priests can't marry, without betraying some religious bias.  

I am a non-Catholic who has taught at a Catholic school and I knew many practicing Catholics who would not be able to answer this question as well as some of the non-Catholics.  I also know some Catholic priests at the school would answer saying that they did not agree with the stance and thought it was likely to change within the next couple of decades.  

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11 minutes ago, maize said:

And if they don't know, they can say: "let's go ask Ms. X to answer that question" or any number of other acceptable responses.

I would expect a teacher at a religious school to avoid undermining the religion, and to follow whatever conduct code the school asks them to.

 

Exactly

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Our local Catholic schools have many teachers that are not Catholic, especially when teaching subjects in higher grades that need more specific expertise.  Our local Catholic schools also tend to have a lot of students that are not Catholic.  When my oldest attended there were students from many faiths - other Christian denominations, Jewish, Muslim, Hindu, atheist.  Parents enrolled their students because it was a better education than their local schools.

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2 hours ago, happysmileylady said:

My feeling on that aspect is not a super strong one, but honestly, to me, it just makes sense.  I say that as a former elementary ed certified teacher who applied to private schools with faith based learning....who happens to be an atheist, and was a former Catholic.  

 

My belief is based on the idea that teachers in a religious school should be able to answer questions of the students in a religious manner.  What I mean is....

 

Should a second grade student come to his regular teacher and ask questions about the sacraments of his faith, his teacher, as a person employed by his faith, should be able to answer that within the bounds of that faith and be able to do so without feelings or guilt or withholding info, etc.   A Baptist teacher, at a Catholic school is unlikely to be able to answer questions about why priests can't marry, without betraying some religious bias.  

 

Dh works for a non-Catholic Christian school, we are Catholic. In a situation like that, he would simply steer the child to someone who could answer his questions in a better manner. And if the student asked him about the Catholic faith he would simply say that this isn't an appropriate setting for him to discuss this since he is not the religious education teacher.

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3 hours ago, happysmileylady said:

So, a question....if a Muslim child asks a...say, Catholic teacher....why Muslim women wear a hijab, in  a Muslim school, how to you expect that teacher to answer?

If she doesn't know the answer (which she may, if she's taught there a lot or simply read a bit about Islam),  she would probably refer them to their Islamic Studies teacher.  

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Regarding cameras, I teach at a special education school with many nonverbal students, and we do have use of seclusion as a behavioral intervention. Every seclusion room, classroom, hallway, common room, etc, has cameras. Parents are NOT able to watch video. However, administrators check them throughout the day just as an overview, and the recordings are pulled up and thoroughly reviewed if anyone (teacher, staff, kid, parent) has a complaint or question about something that happened. 

As a teacher, this actually makes me feel safer. I like knowing that if someone unfairly accuses me, it won’t just be my word against theirs. And it’s great when a kid gets hurt at recess or has a seizure and we can go back and see exactly what happened. 

I see no reason why this system couldn’t be implemented in all schools.

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Interesting discussion on religious schools.

I taught at a largely Presbyterian school and am not that. They emphasized predestination, and I am more middle-of-the road. It came up in the initial interview, and I told them that I would defer to their parents on that issue. I wasn't teaching theology anyway. Periodically other hot button issues came up in class (elections, same-sex marriage, women in church leadership, Palestine, etc. etc.), and I deferred to the parents there as well. Apparently that's the approach they wanted because I taught for them for seven years. 

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My line in the sand is that I don't think teachers should be allowed to smoke. No one's kid should have to be stuck in a room all day with someone who smells like an ashtray. Yuck. Beyond that, teachers can do what they want in their free time. It's hard enough getting decent teachers without imposing ridiculous morality clauses on them like it's 1850.

As far as past criminal behavior, it depends on the crime. 

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15 hours ago, happysmileylady said:

I do believe that all teachers at a private religious school should be members of that faith.  

Not just members but actively living in accordance with the teachings of that faith. If a teacher at a religious school is doing something in his/her private life conflicting with that faith, I have ZERO problems with being fired over it.

Now I do think that religious schools need to be careful in when they decide to fire a teacher over a conduct violation so as to not incentivize worse behaviors. For example, I don't think a teacher who gets pregnant (or causes a pregnancy) outside of wedlock but then quickly marries the baby's other parent should be fired. That just incentivizes having a secret abortion over acting responsibly.

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12 hours ago, Where's Toto? said:

Our local Catholic schools have many teachers that are not Catholic, especially when teaching subjects in higher grades that need more specific expertise.  Our local Catholic schools also tend to have a lot of students that are not Catholic.  When my oldest attended there were students from many faiths - other Christian denominations, Jewish, Muslim, Hindu, atheist.  Parents enrolled their students because it was a better education than their local schools.

And this is EXACTLY the problem with modern Catholic education. If I'm going to be spending big bucks to send my child to a Catholic school, I want a thoroughly Catholic education and priority in enrollment for students whose parents are active in the Church.

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18 hours ago, happysmileylady said:

My feeling on that aspect is not a super strong one, but honestly, to me, it just makes sense.  I say that as a former elementary ed certified teacher who applied to private schools with faith based learning....who happens to be an atheist, and was a former Catholic.  

 

My belief is based on the idea that teachers in a religious school should be able to answer questions of the students in a religious manner.  What I mean is....

 

Should a second grade student come to his regular teacher and ask questions about the sacraments of his faith, his teacher, as a person employed by his faith, should be able to answer that within the bounds of that faith and be able to do so without feelings or guilt or withholding info, etc.   A Baptist teacher, at a Catholic school is unlikely to be able to answer questions about why priests can't marry, without betraying some religious bias.  

A qualified math teacher should be able to direct students to an appropriate person for answers to such questions,  as there is no reasonable expectation that these questions are ever related to the material she is teaching. There is no reason the math teacher needs to discuss religion.

Edited by regentrude
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21 minutes ago, Crimson Wife said:

And this is EXACTLY the problem with modern Catholic education. If I'm going to be spending big bucks to send my child to a Catholic school, I want a thoroughly Catholic education and priority in enrollment for students whose parents are active in the Church.


I guess as one of those non-Catholics, I don't understand how reaching out to, and including non-Catholics would make a school less "thoroughly Catholic".  Evangelism is an important part of Christianity.  No one has said that the non-Catholic teachers are teaching things that are in conflict with Catholicism, just that sometimes they defer to others, just like they do with other subjects.  I know that if a kid asks me a history question that I can't answer, I will either help them find the answer in a book, or direct them to a history teacher.  If a kid comes to me with a theology question that I can't answer, I'll do the same thing.  

As far as admissions, our local Catholic schools struggle with enrollment numbers.  There are a few specific questions, but most of them have few students than they wish.  I know, as the person who works with admissions, that we'd theoretically give priority to students who attended Catholic K-8, or whose families are active in their parish, but in reality we're accepting every appropriate applicant who comes our way.  There are a couple schools that are exceptions and have competitive admissions, and they all give priority to siblings, then in parish families, then families who active in another parish, but they aren't the majoirty. 

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32 minutes ago, Crimson Wife said:

And this is EXACTLY the problem with modern Catholic education. If I'm going to be spending big bucks to send my child to a Catholic school, I want a thoroughly Catholic education and priority in enrollment for students whose parents are active in the Church.

Unfortunately around here many of the Catholic schools are being forced to close their doors due to lack of enrollment as it is.  The elementary school my dd went to for K-2nd grade closed, as well as 2 other elementary schools and the high school nearest there.   There are now 4 Catholic High Schools in our county of 500,000 people, with Catholic being the largest Christian denomination, and none in the next county over.  Only one of those 4 is affordable to middle class, the other three are priced more typically of private schools rather than parochial, and only 1 is associated with a specific congregation.

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31 minutes ago, regentrude said:

A qualified math teacher should be able to direct students to an appropriate person for answers to such questions,  as there is no reasonable expectation that these questions are ever related to the material she is teaching. There is no reason the math teacher needs to discuss religion.

Except some families want their children's school to have a Catholic (for example) culture. They don't want to compartmentalize "religion" to 45 minutes once a day. They want their children to see men and women of faith, living that Faith in a daily basis. 

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21 hours ago, Liz CA said:

 

Agreed. I would think respect for a teacher is greatly diminished when photos surface on Social Media sites that show the person making inappropriate choices. After all, they are supposed to be teaching and that would include teaching by example.

Who gets to decide what an “inappropriate choice” is? If the person is not doing anything illegal, where is the line? I’m seriously asking this, because, I think that’s the thrust of the issue. I have no idea how I feel about it. 

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1 hour ago, Crimson Wife said:

Not just members but actively living in accordance with the teachings of that faith. If a teacher at a religious school is doing something in his/her private life conflicting with that faith, I have ZERO problems with being fired over it.

Now I do think that religious schools need to be careful in when they decide to fire a teacher over a conduct violation so as to not incentivize worse behaviors. For example, I don't think a teacher who gets pregnant (or causes a pregnancy) outside of wedlock but then quickly marries the baby's other parent should be fired. That just incentivizes having a secret abortion over acting responsibly.

 

What about being separated/divorced while teaching at a conservative Christian school? I'm aware of several in that situation who were not asked back the following year. I personally think that's very harsh and should be handled on a case-by-case basis. Perhaps the husband ran off with someone from work, and the woman is receiving counselling and remains involved with her church. If she kept that out of her classroom, what is the problem with that?

But as we said before, private schools can do as they wish. 

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28 minutes ago, happysmileylady said:

Inappropriate choices are harmful and risky ones, and ones that encourage behavior that is illegal for the students but not illegal for the teacher.

For example, getting drunk, drinking from beer bongs and otherwise hard partying might not be illegal for the teacher, but it IS illegal if the student tries to copy.  In addition, regardless of the age of the person partying hard, the behavior is risky.  It doesn't just put the person at risk of things like alcohol poisoning, but it makes the person easier to take advantage of.  

 

I think you can find plenty of people who don’t think that those are harmful and/or risky. I would disagree with their assessment. Whose standard prevails?

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52 minutes ago, happysmileylady said:

Inappropriate choices are harmful and risky ones, and ones that encourage behavior that is illegal for the students but not illegal for the teacher.

For example, getting drunk, drinking from beer bongs and otherwise hard partying might not be illegal for the teacher, but it IS illegal if the student tries to copy.  In addition, regardless of the age of the person partying hard, the behavior is risky.  It doesn't just put the person at risk of things like alcohol poisoning, but it makes the person easier to take advantage of.  

 

 

That would mean the teachers couldn't drive, though. Or vote. Those behaviors are both illegal if you're under a certain age. 

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1 hour ago, happysmileylady said:

Does anyone here want their kid's teacher to post selfies of the teacher, driving their kids, out to a field trip....while the teacher is driving?


That's totally different.

Of course teachers should be held responsible to codes of contact while they're actually in school.  No one is arguing that.  For example, my freedom of speech does not mean that I can teach my math students that 2 + 2 = 5.  I also can't drink alcohol during the school day.  Or jaywalk when I'm travel training.  

The question is whether teachers should get fired for behavior completely unconnected to school, that doesn't put kids directly at risk but might be considered poor modeling.  I think there's a lot of gray area there.

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8 hours ago, Crimson Wife said:

And this is EXACTLY the problem with modern Catholic education. If I'm going to be spending big bucks to send my child to a Catholic school, I want a thoroughly Catholic education and priority in enrollment for students whose parents are active in the Church.

IME, religiously affiliated schools lose their religious identity when a critical mass of faculty and staff are not appreciative of the the faith.  The problem often comes one hire at a time and creeps in before it is realized.  The problem is not necessarily cause by hiring individuals who are not practicing the faith.  I taught at a Catholic university that wanted to hold itself out as providing a Catholic education.  An associate dean, who was not Catholic, but who had great appreciation for the Catholic faith raised the question in a mission/vision meeting of how our education was different because of our Catholic identity; he added the question of how would someone who walked in a classroom know that they were in a Catholic university rather than the state university down the road.  He provided a rhetorical "Because there is a crucifix on the wall?"  The priest who was in the room looked a bit sheepish that it was a non-Catholic who had noticed the absence of crucifixes on the wall rather than one of the Catholics.  The dean of the school replied, "We have crucifixes for each classroom!  They are in the drawer in the office!"  

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On 9/3/2018 at 9:08 AM, happysmileylady said:

I am not saying I am opposed to cameras in the classroom.  My opposition is specifically to the idea of any parent being able to log in to see it at any time.

And lets not forget the possibility of non parents hacking in.

Or the parent of one child who might have a criminal history, logging in to find information to prey upon other kids in the room.

Or any other large number of ways that allowing all the families of the kids in the classroom to view a live feed of the classroom could go very very wrong.

 

 

BUT, a camera to record for review later by the principle that, IMO could be a good thing.  Imagine how teacher and lesson reviews and evals could go if the principle didn't have to be present in the classroom every time he has to observe a lesson.  It would be much more authentic as well, because the teacher wouldn't be putting on a show for the principle (or vice principle, or whoever.)

 

 

Some daycares do it.  Most parents say after the first few days they like that it is there but don't watch much.  Not sure they have audio though.

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Here (NZ) teachers are constantly complaining that they no longer get the respect they used to get.  Part of the reason is they are no longer seen to be models of good behaviour dedicated to the job.  They seem to not understand that you can't have things all ways.

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I think teachers in a religious school should be of that religion if at all possible. 

I do not think having non-catholic students at a catholic school undermines anything *when the staff is predominately Catholic*. Catholic schools have always welcomed those of other faiths at their schools.

I think the people who teach children should be able to uphold the social appropriate standards of the community. Frankly, I don’t want my kids taught by someone who stripes their clothing off at Marci gras or spends their weekend crapfaced drunk or many other questionable behaviors. 

If I wouldn’t leave my infant in their care because of it - I’m not eager to leave my school’s kids with them either.

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Teachers need to be held to a higher standard because they are working with kids.  Period.  

I think cell phones in the classroom will help society weed out the teachers that are loons.   I can think of two raving teachers from my time in school that would have been fired if cell phones video recording existed back then.   It would have been helpful in the PP's situation, although even then the teacher was merely moved to a different school.  That is truly sickening.  
 

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1 hour ago, Murphy101 said:

I think teachers in a religious school should be of that religion if at all possible. 

I do not think having non-catholic students at a catholic school undermines anything *when the staff is predominately Catholic*. Catholic schools have always welcomed those of other faiths at their schools.

I think the people who teach children should be able to uphold the social appropriate standards of the community. Frankly, I don’t want my kids taught by someone who stripes their clothing off at Marci gras or spends their weekend crapfaced drunk or many other questionable behaviors. 

If I wouldn’t leave my infant in their care because of it - I’m not eager to leave my school’s kids with them either.

 

See and those things wouldn't bother me one bit as long as the teacher wasn't posting it on their social media accounts for all to see. I would also expect them not to come to class work drunk or  discuss their behavior with their students.

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