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so cool, and excited . . .and things to think about


gardenmom5
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1ds just got back from his capstone conference.   this is sponsored by industry, as universities *think* they are training their engineers the way industry wants  .  . . industry has taken it into their own hands to train up and coming engineers the way they want (they pay for this, it's cheaper than training them after they're hired) .. . . seven universities - with teams made up of students from different schools so they have to work with people in different organizations and time zones.   they don't like 4.0 students because they seldom know about how to deal with failure, or are willing to take risks.  

one of the subjects they really pushed was a willingness to fail - for cheap!   iow: build a small cheap model, and learn from it.  iow: do it the wright bros way.  (not the guy whose name I don't recall who designed his big airplane - and crashed it.)  they had a former astronaut speaking, who said many of NASA failures could be  tied to the "thou shalt toe the party line" (no dissenting questions allowed) attitude that protected bigwig egos.

there was also the question "who said 'failure is not an option'?"   - an actor.  Gene Krantz never said it.  (I've seen interviews with Krantz - that one-dimensional actor didn't do him justice)

and sometimes simple designs are harder to build than more complex designs..

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At my last engineering school (married, so I had to transfer), most of the professors were retired from working in the oil, gas, and chemical industry with a few power guys tossed in. It was great! It was different from the previous school which was all academics. 

I took full advantage of the co-op and later internship programs. These are so very helpful to students - helping you make sure you will enjoy the career - as well as earning you money for future school - as well as looking great on your resume!

I'm glad to see industry is stepping in to help the students. 

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5 hours ago, Bambam said:

At my last engineering school (married, so I had to transfer), most of the professors were retired from working in the oil, gas, and chemical industry with a few power guys tossed in. It was great! It was different from the previous school which was all academics. 

I took full advantage of the co-op and later internship programs. These are so very helpful to students - helping you make sure you will enjoy the career - as well as earning you money for future school - as well as looking great on your resume!

I'm glad to see industry is stepping in to help the students. 

he's a senior this year.  he plans to go directly to a master in structures. (which is what he's been doing in the lab all summer. playing with carbon fiber chipboard.) 

got more information today. with this project,  they learn about supply chain, cost analysis, manufacturing - and the importance of talking to those who do the manufacturing and taking their feedback. (there is actually a community college that trains some of those doing the manufacturing process that is part of this project.) the differences in producing 50 of an item - and 1000.   they'll be using the software the industry uses (non-project students have a "school" version,  not the industry version which is a standard across the industry - everyone uses it.)  planning it out

- the main corporation which is sponsoring it was talking about how they are planning for production of X in 2030 - which means they need the machines for  production to be nailed down to start ordering the parts for the manufacturing process next year so they are ready to start production of X.  it's really quite involved.

  the schools do something they claim is similar for the other students - industry was frank in their presentation to the students that no, the schools don't.  

did learn a lot about the guggenheim family - as ds was pointing out there were initially seven guggenheim aeronautics schools.  one of the engineering buildings here is guggenheim - and georgia tech, where they were - is guggenheiim.  so we went and looked it all up to see the connection with the guggenheim museum of modern art.  (uncle solomon.)  grandpa Meyer started their family fortune in mining and smelting.  Dad Daniel took over the business.   harry guggenheim loved airplanes and started the connection to aeronautics . . . he sponsored robert goddard.  even brought in a young lt. jimmy doolittle.

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5 hours ago, gardenmom5 said:

he's a senior this year.  he plans to go directly to a master in structures. (which is what he's been doing in the lab all summer. playing with carbon fiber chipboard.) 

got more information today. with this project,  they learn about supply chain, cost analysis, manufacturing - and the importance of talking to those who do the manufacturing and taking their feedback. (there is actually a community college that trains some of those doing the manufacturing process that is part of this project.) the differences in producing 50 of an item - and 1000.   they'll be using the software the industry uses (non-project students have a "school" version,  not the industry version which is a standard across the industry - everyone uses it.)  planning it out

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This sounds great! This makes it real. This makes them start thinking long term, and about planning, and about how things all fit together in the real world.  IMO, engineers think about how to do things - easier, faster, safer, cheaper, more efficiently, etc. And to do that well, you need the whole picture. 

The company I worked for first after college - they rotated all the new engineers between departments to try to help them get a feel and understanding for the entire picture. Once you have spent six months in maintenance, you do think more about things when you work in capital projects to design and build things!

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