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Compare AAS/AAR to LoE?


Faith Dean
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I've used AAR and AAS for five of my children all the way through - all four levels of reading and all seven levels of spelling. It's been okay and I don't have any huge complaints but the spelling has been lacking in that (for my kids) the review wasn't sequential enough.

I'm looking for something that combines handwriting, phonics, spelling, and grammar as well as (maybe) some composition. AAS lacks in that area and I would like to combine more. Does LoE Foundations fit the bill?

I have a second set of littles that I'm now introducing to reading/phonics/spelling and wonder how AAR/AAS compares to LoE Foundations. Would anyone who has used both say that one or the other is better? Which one do you feel laid a more solid foundation? They both use the OG approach, but does anyone have an opinion about the long-lasting success?  

I know both are very teacher-intensive, but I'm not worried about that. 

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I have used LoE ABC, AAR 3 and 4, and AAS 2.  

We hated AAS and I think it's a terrible program, especiallyas the kids get older.  I never suggest it.  My kids were over the tiles thing by 1st grade.  I do like Soaring with Spelling.  

AAR required no writing at all, it us just reading.  My kids did not like the games or fluency sheets (I think the fluency sheets are great,  but I had to make up games with the words to get them to read them).  Loe does have a small amount of writing in it, but I would not call it grammar past the 2nd grade level.  It does have some handwriting.  

I think both programs are comparable with regard to their teaching content.  My kids preferred LOE, and the phonogram games.  AAR has more word practice and I liked their stories better.   I don't like having all the LA in one program, so that wasn't ever something that I considered.  

I like teaching writing and grammar together at the younger ages, separate from reading.  I teach it without any real program, but I like McRuffy handwriting books and use them for handwriting and grammar for 1st grade.  

You can easily use LOE word lists for spelling for 1st grade, but the reating jumps to quickly once you get yo book C.  

 

 

 

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Following....

I like AAR. It is getting the job done for 2 different kids. I had similar trouble with AAS except we only got partway through level 2. I am trying traditional spelling 1 from memoria press this year for 2nd grade. We shall see how it goes, if it goes well we will then use traditional spelling 2 and then go into the spelling workbooks from christian liberty with my own made up added phonics reinforcement where needed. The Christian Liberty workbooks looked to me to be the most phonetic with good lists and no mispelled word exercises....

Edited by countrymum
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  • 2 weeks later...

If you have little ones that are learning phonics I really like MP First Start Reading. It does a great job introducing letters and then blending. It introduces dictation and reading comprehension. The workbooks are very reasonable and you don’t need the TM. MP also sells a cheap guide with a schedule if you want to add in Core Skill Phonics workbook in the same order, so it will skip around to match the pace and schedule readings. My oldest had trouble with blending and FSR really helped him when he was having trouble with AAR. For that reason with my youngest I waited until she finished the first book before adding in AAR1 and it’s going much faster with her. For mine adding in the writing component has really helped everything click. I still love AAR and use FSR alongside it. 

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  • 1 month later...

We used LOE Foundations A-D.  And other kids reached other various levels of Foundations.  I just switched everyone over to AAR/AAS.  The child who went through Foundations A-D is an excellent reader, however he cannot spell to save his life.  For us, LOE became overwhelming.  It is a good program, but it gets into so much detail by the end of D, that my kids were becoming overwhelmed with all of the rules and things.  With that being said, I think it is more in depth than AAR/AAS, at least from what I see so far.  However, at this point, I don't think my kids need that level of depth, in fact it overwhelmed them.  I'm sure everyone has different experiences, but that was ours.  Also, I loved Foundations having all of the younger kids LA combined.  I miss that.  The games were fun, but at least one of my kids wasn't into them.  LOE games are more physical, like jump every time you hear /a/, while the AAR games they do seated at the table with craft sheets.  

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On 10/20/2018 at 11:58 AM, Paradox5 said:

Actually LOE is Spalding based and AAS/AAR is O-G based. These are different methods.

 

Can you tell me where you are getting that information?  I have never heard that LOE is Spalding based.  I even google searched Spalding + Logic of English and could not find anything.

I am researching LOE as an alternative to some of the harder to teach OG programs.  (And I do NOT like Spalding even though it is based on OG methods, it does not work well for my children.)   So if you could educate me, I would appreciate it.  :) :)

 

Quotes below from:  https://www.logicofenglish.com/faqs/general-faqshttps://www.logicofenglish.com/faqs/general-faqs

Quote

 

Logic of English is an Orton-Gillingham program with a number of unique characteristics. One is that we expand the original list of 70 basic phonograms identified by Dr. Orton to include five additional ones: augh, bu, gu, es, and cei. Our spelling rules also include concepts not covered in most other OG programs.

Another key distinction is our strong belief that multi-sensory, systematic phonics instruction builds the best foundation for success in reading for all students, not just those who have been diagnosed with specific learning disabilities and those who have access to specialized reading remediation programs.

In addition, we seek to make this material available to all by creating curriculum that is easy to teach, engaging, and fun!

You can read more about how Logic of English relates to Dr. Orton's work in several related articles on our blog. To see and hear 74 of the basic phonograms taught in LOE, click here.

 

 

 

Quote

 

Logic of English is an Orton-Gillingham-based approach. Some characteristics that distinguish it from other approaches and other OG programs:

  • Our program is built for ease of use in the home or the classroom without extensive or highly specialized training.
  • We emphasize critical thinking: English is logical and conforms to a set of rules, but it is also complex. Students learn the rules by discovery, looking at words to discover the pattern in their spelling before being told a rule by the teacher. They gain tools for thinking critically about language.
  • We provide linguistically accurate rules that logically describe English spelling, equipping students to decode English words successfully with 74 basic phonograms and 31 spelling rules.
  • We let kids be kids and teach the whole student and every student: Students may be strong auditory, visual or kinesthetic learners or, more commonly, a mixture of all three. They may also be analytical or intuitive thinkers. LOE builds on the strengths of all students while strengthening their weaknesses through active, multi-sensory lessons. The lessons are playful, active, and fun.
  • We move from large to fine motor. Forming letters by writing is the strongest kinesthetic component of learning to read. A distinctive element of LOE is teaching children the shape of letters using their large motor skills—forming them with their whole arms or even their whole bodies! This allows young children to start early and succeed. In addition, incorporating kinesthetic learning in this way helps to connect visual, motor, and auditory centers for children who are weak in one or more of these areas.
  • We go beyond teaching the rules of phonics and support students in the development of fluency and reading comprehension, supporting them as they bridge from learning to read to reading to learn and enjoy!

 

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Edited by TheAttachedMama
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On 10/26/2018 at 1:31 PM, TheAttachedMama said:

Can you tell me where you are getting that information?  I have never heard that LOE is Spalding based.  I even google searched Spalding + Logic of English and could not find anything.

 

I used to hear that a lot a few years ago but haven't recently. I would download the samples and scope and sequence links to see if you think it might work for your kids. One thing I notice is that lessons will cover a multitude of concepts. Foundations is more incremental than Essentials though. When I look at the word lists (see the bottom of this post for word lists by level), both programs seem to do a blend of focusing on high frequency words with some aspects of organizing by concept included--kind of a hybrid of approaches. Hopefully that can help you decide if it would work for you!

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