Jump to content

Menu

Pelvic Floor Prolapse exercises suggestions


Shellydon
 Share

Recommended Posts

I have a grade two pelvic organ prolapse.  If you have had something similar did you find that exercises worked and do you have a specific video series that you would recommend? I'm trying to decide whether I should just skip the exercises and do surgery or not. Despite the fact that I live in a large city there is not a PT available in my area for prolapse. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kathy Bowman has some great videos, some of them are on YouTube.

And it sounds insane, but if you get (or make) an opportunity to visit a city with a PT, make an appointment.  Just one session with someone who can more clearly direct you what muscles to use and HOW to do the exercises will make a huge difference.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I got the DVD "Hab-it". And then never did the exercises..BUT I did watch the intro about posture changes. And now, two months later, my prolapse is significantly better just from changing my posture. So I imagine if you actually do the exercises it works even better, lol. 

The main posture issues are locking your knees (turns out I do this ALL THE TIME) and tucking your butt under, which tilts the pelvis back which leads to prolapse. You want the butt out and the pelvis tipped forward, so that the pubic bone supports the pelvic organs. 

It did take about 2 months, with some improvement in 1 month, but it's much better. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, KathyBC said:

What is a failure?

There are 3 kinds of pelvic floor prolapse (bladder, uterus, and rectum) and they can all fail in different ways. The surgery can fail in that the prolapse returns after the surgery. Many prolapse surgeries have to be redone at least every 10 years.  They can also fail by causing painful scar tissue which can cause people to avoid sex. Occasionally with rectoceles repairs can lead to rectal/vaginal fissures. If you are going to have surgery you should definitely go to a large city and see a urogynecologist specialist who does pelvic repairs all the time.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had a consultation about my stage 2/3 prolapse with a specialist and he said he is only successful about 70 % of the time. A 30% failure rate is not encouraging. You also should not have surgery until you are absolutely positive you won't have any more children because pregnancy and birth would most likely undo the repair. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, NewIma said:

I had a consultation about my stage 2/3 prolapse with a specialist and he said he is only successful about 70 % of the time. A 30% failure rate is not encouraging. You also should not have surgery until you are absolutely positive you won't have any more children because pregnancy and birth would most likely undo the repair. 

How did you find such a candid specialist, lol? Around here, hospitals send out preventative medicine tips in newsletters, which feature specialty "did you know there is help for that" articles in them. These articles often feature pelvic problems as one of those things you shouldn't have to put up with.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, Joules said:

Kathy Bowman has some great videos, some of them are on YouTube.

And it sounds insane, but if you get (or make) an opportunity to visit a city with a PT, make an appointment.  Just one session with someone who can more clearly direct you what muscles to use and HOW to do the exercises will make a huge difference.

I'll look that up, thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/10/2018 at 8:37 AM, NewIma said:

There are 3 kinds of pelvic floor prolapse (bladder, uterus, and rectum) and they can all fail in different ways. The surgery can fail in that the prolapse returns after the surgery. Many prolapse surgeries have to be redone at least every 10 years.  They can also fail by causing painful scar tissue which can cause people to avoid sex. Occasionally with rectoceles repairs can lead to rectal/vaginal fissures. If you are going to have surgery you should definitely go to a large city and see a urogynecologist specialist who does pelvic repairs all the time.  

 

On 8/10/2018 at 8:40 AM, NewIma said:

I had a consultation about my stage 2/3 prolapse with a specialist and he said he is only successful about 70 % of the time. A 30% failure rate is not encouraging. You also should not have surgery until you are absolutely positive you won't have any more children because pregnancy and birth would most likely undo the repair. 

PT and surgery can be complementary treatments, not either/or. Yes, I was told that prolapse surgeries will need to be redone after many years, so the later in life you begin the process is likely more desirable.I wouldn't call that a failure. Pacemakers need to be replaced after many years, too. They're the best surgical options we have for health issues at this time.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/10/2018 at 8:40 AM, NewIma said:

I had a consultation about my stage 2/3 prolapse with a specialist and he said he is only successful about 70 % of the time. A 30% failure rate is not encouraging. You also should not have surgery until you are absolutely positive you won't have any more children because pregnancy and birth would most likely undo the repair. 

I can't wrap my brain around either patient or medical community considering prolapse surgery until the patient was done with child bearing.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...