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Robin M

Book a Week 2018 - BW32: Blind date with a book

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Happy Sunday and welcome to week thirty-two in our Open Roads Reading Adventure. Greetings to all our readers and everyone following our progress. Mister Linky is available weekly on 52 Books in 52 Weeks  to share a link to your book reviews.

This month we are going on a blind date with a book.  Your mission is to go on an adventure to the library or book store in search of a new book.    You may also use the internet by doing a google image search for  book covers.   Or play along using your home shelves if short of funds or time.

How it works:  At the book store, pick a random book based on its position on the shelf.  To choose a book: decide in advance  (1) Genre, (2)  two number between 1 and 5, and (3) one number between 1 and 30. Using these numbers, find the chosen Genre in the book store or library, count over certain number of sections in the aisle, go down that number of shelves and count to the 3rd number and that's the book you'll get.  I'll be going to Barnes and Noble sometime this week and will let you know what I find.

I did a random search on google and these books attracted my attention:


book%2Bcover%2Bone%2Bnation%2Bunder%2BGod.jpg

book%2Bcover%2Bwillows%2Bof%2Bfate.jpg

Book%2Bcover%2BTess%2Bof%2Bthe%2BRoad.jpg 

Spread your reading wings a bit and chose a genre you don't normally read.

Our Brit Trip is taking us to Derbyshire this week: Derbyshire is primarily a rural county that boasts being the location of many pop culture references including – the home of Pemberly, the location for Georgette Heyer’s novel The Toll-Gate, and the filming location of The Princess Bride.

Rabbit trails: Highest peak in Derbyshire – Kinder Scout  Bolsover Castle  Chatsworth House

 
Have fun exploring!   What are you reading?

 

Link to Week 31

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Fun day today as it's James 19th Birthday.  Despite expectations and  thinking he knows what he is getting, I managed to sneak in a couple surprises.   So much for spoilers! 

I'm enjoying Rachel Caine's Great Library series.  Finished Paper and Fire and now on to #3 Ash and Quill.  

 

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Robin,  What fun,  I always enjoy the random book challenge.  As I am feeling hot and lazy I may just adapt it for overdrive!

 I just saw......Happy Birthday to James!  He will love a few surprises.  I enjoyed the Great Library series also.

 

So Derbyshire.....I am going to try and read Stephen Booth again.  Someone here is going to cringe when she reads this........a few years ago I posted an incredibly enthusiastic description while reading the Black Dog which is the first in the series.  The setting was one I know and the descriptions in the book very true to reality.  The mystery compelling....I was in love with a new series.  I had People here reading that book within a day!  Yep, I wrote a grand review before I finished the book,  oops!  

Well,  the end of that book takes a violent turn that was distasteful for me and everyone else.  One of those eye popping  ewwws.  This is a warning....I never expected it because he is an incredibly popular author here.  Sweet little old ladies read all his books, I checked them out when I worked in the library.  Probably our most popular author locally.  He is an incredibly accessible author and promotes libraries and bookstores with appearances, lives somewhat locally apparently.  We have a new used bookstore that everyone is in love with in a nearby small town and he has been supportive.  Has another appearance there soon and I might go if I make it through Dancing With the Virgins. ? https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/522367.Dancing_with_the_Virgins. I want to add that the one library reader I asked about his books did not consider them to have the ewww factor but they thought they had skipped The Black Dog, that may be the Secret.  I will report when the book is done!

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Robin, Happy Birthday to James! 

Also, as always, thank you so much for this fabulous thread. 

I read The Force of Reason - 4 Stars - There are a few authors that I would love to meet. Those that come to my immediate mind: Ayaan Hirsi Ali, Brigitte Gabriel, and the author of this book, the late Oriana Fallaci.

Let’s just say that she wasn’t exactly the most loved individual, but she was certainly fascinating and led quite an exciting life. When reading her books or reviewing them, I believe that it’s helpful to know some background information about her life.

As a teenager in Italy, she fought Nazi-fascism. She would cycle around the hills of Tuscany, delivering messages and transporting explosives in her bike, hiding them in a basket among lettuce and other vegetables. Then later as a war reporter, she covered major conflicts throughout the world and interviewed many public figures. She was probably the only Western journalist to have interviewed Ayatollah Khomeini twice. I love how she called the chador, “a stupid, medieval rag”.

She also interviewed Cassius Clay (Muhammad Ali), whom she walked out on after he rudely belched in her face; Yasir Arafat, whom she despised; and Qaddafi, whom she also hated.

She spent her final years, while succumbing to cancer, between her native Tuscany and New York City. The U.S. was her adopted homeland and she loved it dearly. “The Force of Reason” is the second in a trilogy of books that she wrote following the horrific 9/11 attacks. She was living in Manhattan during that time.

As a result of her writing, she made many enemies and received numerous death threats. There were cries of outrage and demands to burn her books.

Overall, this wasn’t as good as her first book, which I truly loved. Her writing style may be difficult to appreciate at times, since she insisted on translating them herself. It is Italian English and reading it takes a bit of patience. I would only recommend this book for die-hard Oriana fans, like myself. This is an excerpt of my review. My full review is here

I also read The American Miracle - 4 Stars - My knowledge of American history is embarrassingly limited. I did not grow up in the U.S. and when I finally arrived to Oregon as a young college student, my major didn’t require any history courses. I’ve always loved history, but taking it in college didn’t interest me.

When my husband and I were newlyweds living in Southern California, we would usually go to the movies on the weekends. My husband would often recommend that I look up movie reviews by Michael Medved. I think that he was reviewing movies on PBS at the time. It turns out that he’s also written many books. This is the first one that I have read by him. It’s meticulously researched and although there were a few parts that were a bit on the dry side for me, all in all I enjoyed it immensely.

It’s an absolutely fascinating and deep theory about how so many events in American history have been the result of the hand of God and were not accidents. He describes specific incidents where God has worked miracles starting with the Pilgrims and ending with Abraham Lincoln. And no, the book does not claim that America is perfect, but after reading this, I realized that it’s a country that’s incredibly blessed with an exceptional history.

There were two parts that I most loved about this book. One was his amazing description of how he met his wife. The other is his reminder that although God has intervened in American history, Americans should act nobly and have an attitude of gratitude and humility. In other words, they should not forget how blessed they are, what a truly exceptional and unique country they have, and finally, they should remember to honor Him. I wish that this book would be required reading in high schools or colleges. It would be such an inspiring and refreshing change when compared to all the negativity these days.  

9780847827534.jpg     9780553447286.jpg

MY RATING SYSTEM
5 Stars
Fantastic, couldn't put it down
4 Stars
Really Good
3 Stars
Enjoyable 
2 Stars
Just Okay – nothing to write home about
1 Star
Rubbish – waste of my money and time. Few books make it to this level, since I usually give up on them if they’re that bad. 

 

 

 

Edited by Negin
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14 minutes ago, Mom-ninja. said:

Negin, I think you have contributed to at least 1/3 of the books on my tr list. 

You are so sweet. So many of the books on my wish list are from you also! I often smile at how we tend to have similar tastes, even with workout videos! I'm pretty sure that it was you who would often recommend Fitness Blender. Was it you? Anyway, if so, I've been meaning to thank you for the longest while. I love all their workouts so far, except I can't do anything high intensity (HIIT). Thank you for that!

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Hi everyone! 

Happy Birthday to your son, Robin! And I can't wait to go back and go through the links you posted. ? 

Negin, Ms. Fallaci sounds like a fascinating person - are her interviews available somewhere?

Last week I read two books: The Word is Murder by Anthony Horowitz. I loved it.

and The Wonder by Emma Donoghue Very interesting story, it pulled me right in but it was a three and a half star read for me.

I've also been listening to an audio version of Dracula and am surprised at how much I am enjoying it.

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2 hours ago, Mothersweets said:

Negin, Ms. Fallaci sounds like a fascinating person - are her interviews available somewhere?

I think there are some on You Tube. I haven't had time to watch them yet. I do plan on reading her other book eventually. 

9780789331328.jpg

 

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So what am I reading now.......

I am slowly reading the next book in the Anne Cleeland series that Kareni recommended to me.  Murder in Containment is the fourth in the series featuring Doyle and Acton.  It’s been a couple of months since I read the first 3 back to back but I seem to remember all.  Enjoying it.....I was able to get it through the prime lending library for free.  It pops up occasionally and that particular day I had not used my monthly allotment.

I am listening to The Mayor of Casterbridge by Thomas Hardy as a read (listen) along with VC.  I made it to chapter 27 yesterday with no progress today at all.  It’s far better then I anticipated, my other Hardy exposure was Return of the Native for a class decades ago.  It wasn’t a favorite. ?. That being fully disclosed I am totally entertained listening to Simon Vance (a preferred narrator) read this book to me.  Selling your wife seems to bring ?very bad karma.......

I just finished Death Comes to the Fair by Catherine Lloydhttps://www.goodreads.com/book/show/29429246-death-comes-to-the-fair.  This is a series that I have been enjoying but for Brit Tripping it’s been an odd trip.  The location of the Manor house seems to move...... Originally a local article I read said it was set in Nottinghamshire so I placed it there on the master list.  The bus arrived in Notts and I read the book.....I was in Essex or Suffolk, the estate sat on the border.  I corrected things and kept reading the series.  Today I notice Hertfordshire keeps being mentioned, then a nearby village is named.  Same exact estate has apparently been transported magically to Hertfordshire.   One more book to go and I am wondering if the Estate will be in Notts this time.  Lol. 

I have several other books in my immediate stack and am not sure which I plan to read next.

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19 hours ago, tuesdayschild said:

...and are hoping to have our new house at a liveable stage so we can move into it before Christmas.  The packing is going well. Thanks ?

I hope that the timing will work out for you!

5 hours ago, Robin M said:

Fun day today as it's James 19th Birthday. 

A very happy birthday to James!

29 minutes ago, mumto2 said:

I am slowly reading the next book in the Anne Cleeland series that Kareni recommended to me.  Murder in Containment is the fourth in the series featuring Doyle and Acton.  It’s been a couple of months since I read the first 3 back to back but I seem to remember all.  Enjoying it....

I'm glad to hear you're enjoying the book, mumto2!

Regards,
Kareni

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Several bookish posts from Tor.com ~

Is Nan around?  This one made me think of her: The Story of a Bear of Very Little Brain  by Mari Ness 

Lloyd Alexander’s Chronicles of Prydain Tells a Fresh Story with Old Tropes  by James A Moore

Five Books About Ridiculously Powerful Wizards  by Jenn Lyons 

Five Feminist SFF Takes on the Classics  by Tracy Banghart

Regards,
Kareni

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Some more bookish posts ~

What Would You Wield? Cast A Spell With Our Harry Potter Wand Quiz!  by Sarah S. Davis

My result: 

"Sycamore with dragon heartstring core

This wand is perfect for an ambitious person who sees their life as a great quest and adventure. You are bored easily and hence like to learn new things. Only a wizard who seeks intelligence and wisdom like you is powerful enough to tame a dragon heartstring core, which you share with Hermione and Professor Minerva McGonagall."
 

and speaking of dragons:

50 Of Our Favorite Fiery Dragon Bookends  by Margaret Kingsbury

Regards,
Kareni

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9 hours ago, Robin M said:

This month we are going on a blind date with a book.  Your mission is to go on an adventure to the library or book store in search of a new book.    You may also use the internet by doing a google image search for  book covers.   Or play along using your home shelves if short of funds or time.

This is how I chose my most recent non-BritTrip book. Dh and I have all our books -- more or less -- in a database, and now and then I have Middle Girl choose a new book randomly using random.org. You just enter the number of books you own, let's say 2416, into the True Random Number Generator, and you have a new book choice. MG picked for me Wordsworth and Coleridge's Lyrical Ballads. This version is the 1798 original and the 1800 second volume, plus extensive notes, including commentaries on the poems by the poets. Several poems were substantially changed over the next two decades, so old familiar favorites like Rime of the Ancient Mariner and We Are Seven are different here than in their anthologized versions.

Almost caught up with the BritTrip bus, having started through Leicestershire with C. P. Snow's Time of Hope, the first in the Strangers and Brothers series of novels. At this rate I may catch up with the bus this week, Sheridan Le Fanu's Uncle Silas being slated for Derbeyshire.

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5 hours ago, mumto2 said:

I am listening to The Mayor of Casterbridge by Thomas Hardy as a read (listen) along with VC.  I made it to chapter 27 yesterday with no progress today at all.  It’s far better then I anticipated, my other Hardy exposure was Return of the Native for a class decades ago.  It wasn’t a favorite. ?. That being fully disclosed I am totally entertained listening to Simon Vance (a preferred narrator) read this book to me.  Selling your wife seems to bring ?very bad karma.......

 

I finished Mayor of Casterbridge just the other day. Couldn't help noticing that, just like all of Hardy's mature work, it's full of spying and eavesdropping. Notice how many times people are peering at, or listening in on, other characters? 

Hardy also loves his allusions that are much deeper than they first appear.

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I finished several books:

- Lauwertakken en Distels: a book with reviews of the books of Louis Couperus a famous Dutch writer. Inspired to read more of him.

- Een liefde: a book that was heavily censored in its time, and now has been republished with the original text. 

- The diary of a bookseller: a light reading but not a 'must heave read'.

- The Glasblowers by Daphne du Maurier: a wel written family chronicle set during the end of the ancient regime and the French Revolution. I really liked the book and made me curious about other non Rebecca like books of her.

 

Currently reading:

- Emotional Flexibility

- Talk of the Village

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3 hours ago, Violet Crown said:

This is how I chose my most recent non-BritTrip book. Dh and I have all our books -- more or less -- in a database, and now and then I have Middle Girl choose a new book randomly using random.org. You just enter the number of books you own, let's say 2416, into the True Random Number Generator, and you have a new book choice. MG picked for me Wordsworth and Coleridge's Lyrical Ballads. This version is the 1798 original and the 1800 second volume, plus extensive notes, including commentaries on the poems by the poets. Several poems were substantially changed over the next two decades, so old familiar favorites like Rime of the Ancient Mariner and We Are Seven are different here than in their anthologized versions.

VC and her random number generator solved my how to pick a random book on Overdrive issue although I did it 3 times........

I went into Subjects, the first time I picked fiction and fantasy, plugged the 8000 plus books into the random generator, turned many pages to reach book 2121 and got something I was never going to read.  There wasn't anything on that page I was going to read to be honest. 

Second try...fantasy....an area where I would love to expand my horizons,  this time my number was 51, and I was looking at the 9th book in Karen Marie Morning's Fever series.  It has fae which I generally skip so sort of expanding but no way can I start with 9th in the series.  I went ahead and checked the first book in the Fever series out.  Robin, you like these I think?https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6283272-darkfever

Third try...Sci Fi for my subject......this resulted in Island in the Sea of Time on audio https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/99702.Island_in_the_Sea_of_Time?ac=1&from_search=true.  This one takes the current day Nantucket back to ancient times, as in BC.  I love time travel but in my version people end up as a lady in waiting on a Tudor Court.  Ancient history would never be my choice so I picked it.  Out of my comfort zone.......the reviews are really mixed, so not sure he it will go.

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I read something by Oriana Fallaci a long time ago.  It was about her love affair with the Greek revolutionary who got assassinated.  It was fascinating!  I can't remember his name.

I am becoming such a slow reader.  I did finish A Spool of Blue Thread by Anne Tyler which I highly recommend.  I am still working my way through The Crucified Rabbi by Taylor Marshall and Hold on To Your Kids by Neufeld and Mate.  I started on a re-read of A Town Like Alice by Nevil Shute.  I haven't read it in decades.  Enjoying very much.  After I finish reading it I plan to force my husband into watching the mini-series of 1981 with me.  

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I finished reading Ready Player One this week.   I wouldn't call it the greatest book, but it was addicting in a junk food/Hunger Games kind of way.   I also watched the movie, which stunk.   They changed SO MUCH.   And I realized, so many references they made in the book probably are copyrighted and they couldn't use in the movie.   

I also read The Hating Game which was meh.   The whole book was basically describing, well, foreplay, and not really my cuppa.

I am still struggling through A Suitable Boy about 500 pages out of 1400.   And still, the characters are confusing me.  Possibly my attention is elsewhere right now, and I've never been the best with details.  Or maybe the book has too many characters.

Both The Alice Network and One True Thing came available on Overdrive, so I will be working on those this week.

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23 hours ago, Negin said:

You are so sweet. So many of the books on my wish list are from you also! I often smile at how we tend to have similar tastes, even with workout videos! I'm pretty sure that it was you who would often recommend Fitness Blender. Was it you? Anyway, if so, I've been meaning to thank you for the longest while. I love all their workouts so far, except I can't do anything high intensity (HIIT). Thank you for that!

Yes, I big puffy heart Fitness Blender. This morning I did actually do a HIIT followed by a painful core video. I truly have found nothing better than their videos/programs. I've been doing Five Parks Yoga into my mix as well. A friend of mine introduced me to her videos on Youtube. So far she is my favorite for yoga. 

I recently read a Hirsi book and thought of you the whole time. 

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Finished 4 books this week: 

68.  None of This is Real by Miranda Mellis - a book dd said she liked, decided to try it.  It's 4 short stories, but honestly 'stories' is not quite what they are, imho.  More like someone's dream journal, a bit cleaned-up.  Characters are out of time and place, characters seem to bump into each other rather than interact, things happen seemingly randomly and change bizarrely from one scene to the next with no explanation - that kind of thing.  The first story is the most coherent. Not really my cuppa - fortunately very short.  2 stars.

69. Remnant Population by Elizabeth Moon - For my SciFi book club.  A colony is evacuated for failure to thrive, but one old lady decides she'd rather stick it out in the place she's been living 40 years than start all over somewhere else or possibly die in cryo.  She's very happy to live out her last days alone without anyone bothering her.  But then she's not as alone as she thought... 4 stars.

70. Miss Subways by David Duchovny (audiobook) - really had no idea what to expect of this, it had some interesting reviews and was available.  I ended up really liking it!  It has a premise somewhat similar to American Gods (the gods of the immigrants have moved here with us and haven't quite faded away, and still like to mess with us from time to time).  But I was really disappointed in American Gods.  This one I liked much, much better.  Better character development, better story, and often quite funny!  4 stars.

71. The Indigo Girl by Natasha Boyd (ebook) - actually started this as an audiobook, but could.not.stand. listening to a New Zealander narrate this story of a girl in the American colonies.  She is supposed to 'do accents' well, but I could hear it loud and clear, and it was just distracting!  Anyway, the book itself was interesting, and more enjoyable when I switched to the ebook.  Based on a real-life woman who revolutionized agriculture in South Carolina - apparently well enough-known at the time that George Washington was one of her pallbearers.  This is a fictionalized account, and goes from when she's 16 to her early 20's.  3 stars.

Currently reading:

- La historia de mis dientes / The Story of My Teeth by Valeria Luiselli - had this on my radar for a while but was unable to track down a Spanish-language copy that was not $$.  Finally got one while I was in Spain.  Interesting backstory -  apparently, "the novel began as a project commissioned by an art gallery and sponsored by Jumex, a Mexican juice corporation. The book was to be a work of fiction for the catalog of an exhibition. Luiselli decided to write what became this short novel in installments, which would be read to and discussed by groups of the Jumex factory workers. They in turn sent their reactions to the writer, who incorporated them along with their own stories into the narrative, making the book a collaboration of sorts, a shared vision."  I was a little worried reading this so soon after None of This is Real - wasn't sure if I was ready for another 'trippy' book - but this one is, imho, absurdism done right.  Sure, it makes no sense in some ways, but I can make sense of it (unlike the other book), and it's fun.

- The Golden Days by Cao Xueqin - a bit behind in my goal to read about 100 pages a week of this, but still enjoying it!

- The Refugees by Viet Thanh Nguyen (ebook) - Absolutely loved his novel The Sympathizer last year, so decided to download this one from Overdrive when none of the books I have on hold were available yet!  Just started it this morning.

- White Tears by Hari Kunzru (audiobook) - Not sure where I'm going to come down on this one.  Started off kind of interesting, but now seems to be going down a bit of a rabbit-hole.  Will have to see where it leads us...  and speaking of audio, they couldn't have gotten someone to sing, rather than speak, the blues riffs?  C'mon.  

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12 hours ago, mumto2 said:

Second try...fantasy....an area where I would love to expand my horizons,  this time my number was 51, and I was looking at the 9th book in Karen Marie Morning's Fever series.  It has fae which I generally skip so sort of expanding but no way can I start with 9th in the series.  I went ahead and checked the first book in the Fever series out.  Robin, you like these I think?https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6283272-darkfever

Loved the Fever series  and I've read it a few times.  Totally agree that starting with the first book is better.

4 hours ago, Zebra said:

I am still struggling through A Suitable Boy about 500 pages out of 1400.   And still, the characters are confusing me.  Possibly my attention is elsewhere right now, and I've never been the best with details.  Or maybe the book has too many characters.

I discovered with the chunky books that if I read in small increments, that its too difficult to get into the story.  Large chunks of at least one hour uninterrupted reading makes it easier to keep track of who is who and absorb the story better. 

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54 minutes ago, Robin M said:

I discovered with the chunky books that if I read in small increments, that its too difficult to get into the story.  Large chunks of at least one hour uninterrupted reading makes it easier to keep track of who is who and absorb the story better. 

 

I would have to put Valium in their iced tea.

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I took a photo today of DS and a giant fossil we found at Runswick Bay today and can’t seem to post it in the easy new board way.  I hope they didn’t change that feature.  I can’t remember how I was doing it but know I was posting giant pictures without a url which appears to be needed now.  ?  I can barely move the huge hunk of stone and the lad carried it out in the Sonlight tote bag I had my iPad in.  They really were sturdy bags!  We think it is an ammonite or something similar.  

I finished my Miss Silver, number 4, In the Balance is the title my copy has https://www.goodreads.com/review/list/51042385 I enjoyed it.  It was a lite cozy and pretty predictable.  Quite a bit of knitting seemed to happen.  I gave it a 3 but would have done 3.5 if that had been a choice.

 

Edited by mumto2
Adding photo, I hope
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Dropped by Barnes and Noble's today.  Seems my randoms picks lead me in the direction of books with dogs on the cover. Picked up two romances - Casey Griffin's Must Love Weiners ? as well as Jill Shavis Animal Magnetism.  Made it a trio with Patricia Brigg's Burn Bright.   The clerk made my day when she said "I just loooove books with doggies on the cover."  ?

Forced myself to stop at three.  Going in without a list and randomly looking resulted in drooling over many attractive covers.  

 

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Some recent reads here ~

Personal Geographies: Explorations in Mixed-Media Mapmaking  by Jill K. Berry was an enjoyable read.  I have a long time affection for maps so this hit the spot.

"Explore your Creative Self with Mixed-media Maps

You don't have to be a world traveler or a professional cartographer to embark on a grand journey of self-discovery through mapmaking. Personal Geographies gives you the tools and techniques you'll need to create artful maps of your self, your experiences and your personal journey. Chart the innermost workings of your mind, document your artistic path and create an unfolding maze of your future dreams and goals.

Inside Personal Geographies you'll discover:

  • 21 mixed-media map projects featuring artistic techniques like working with alcohol inks and pochoir, painting on a black surface and carving custom stamps
  • Insight into the world of traditional and contemporary maps and how they relate to and inspire personal mapmaking
  • A gallery of maps by contributors from around the world to spark your own creativity

From mapping your head, hands and heart to recording powerful memories or experiences, the maps in Personal Geographies are a gateway into the fascinating and meaningful world of you."
**

Machine Metal Magic (Mind + Machine Book 1)  by Hanna Dare was an enjoyable science fiction male/male romance that I will likely re-read.  I look forward to reading more in the series.  (Adult content)

"The galaxy's a dangerous place. Best not to travel it alone.

It's been over a century since the AIs rose up and attacked, driving humans from Earth and leaving them scattered across the galaxy. Humanity survives, but always fearful of the technology that allows them travel among the stars, never knowing when it may turn against them once more.

An interstellar fugitive.

For Jaime Bashir, born with the ability to communicate telepathically with computers, his gifts are more of a curse. They also make him a target. On the run, he finds himself among a starship crew, one transporting a mysterious cargo. Even more intriguing is Rylan, the muscled guard watching his every move. Jaime has no reason to trust him, but nowhere else to turn.

A disgraced ex-soldier.

Rylan Slate is looking to leave his past behind. Joining a crew of smugglers is one way to do it. But capturing Jaime is both an opportunity and a danger. He starts out as a prisoner, but then becomes something more, testing loyalties in ways Rylan never expected. Will regaining his honor mean betraying Jaime?"
**

Saving Askara: A Sci-fi Romance   by J.M. Link was an enjoyable science fiction alien romance that (unfortunately) ended with a cliffhanger.  (Adult content)

"Victoria's day starts out like any other aboard the transorbital ship, Phoenix. Such is the life of an emergency medicine specialist in the age of "post-discovery". Sure, she had always dreamed of interacting with intelligent extraterrestrial life- the real thing, not those microbes on distant moons. Who wouldn't? She was still happy with her career, however mundane and demanding it might be. That's what it took to run a ship the size of a small city smoothly. Monotony. But all that changes one morning, and suddenly she's not so sure she didn't stick her foot in it...

Be careful what you wish for.

Escape had been their only drive, and even death was preferable to the alternative. But they never thought their flight for freedom would put them in an uncharted system. Forced to interact with an isolated world and its inferior, albeit curious people. When it affords them an unforseen and unprecedented opportunity to take back their world from those who seek to destroy them, however, Aderus begins to wonder if it wasn't fate. Earth's proposal is shocking and uncomfortable for a fierce, independent race that relishes in their solitude. But the more he learns of humans, the more he comes to admire and respect them. One, in particular."
**

The Spinster and Mr. Glover (Blind Cupid Series Book 1)  by Karyn Gerrard was a short historical novella.  I don't expect to re-read this.  (Adult content)  It's currently free for Kindle readers.

Regards,
Kareni

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14 hours ago, Mom-ninja. said:

Yes, I big puffy heart Fitness Blender. This morning I did actually do a HIIT followed by a painful core video. I truly have found nothing better than their videos/programs. I've been doing Five Parks Yoga into my mix as well. A friend of mine introduced me to her videos on Youtube. So far she is my favorite for yoga. 

You've probably heard that Kelli has some health problems and they're taking a hiatus from making more videos. I hope she feels better soon. I'm still very new to all their videos and have bookmarked all the ones that I still want to try. I've heard of Five Parks Yoga. Thank you for the reminder. I'm now looking at their You Tube page. You've given me some homework and I love it! 

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On 8/6/2018 at 3:17 AM, mumto2 said:

VC and her random number generator solved my how to pick a random book on Overdrive issue although I did it 3 times........

I went into Subjects, the first time I picked fiction and fantasy, plugged the 8000 plus books into the random generator, turned many pages to reach book 2121 and got something I was never going to read.  There wasn't anything on that page I was going to read to be honest. 

I have to re-roll occasionally, too. Sometimes I get one of dh's books, like A Brief Introduction to Some Elementary Considerations in Meta-Propositional Analytic Theory, or A Compendium of the Most Bewildering Experimental Science Fiction, or something in untranslated Greek, and I try again. After spending a few moments wishing I were smarter and better educated.

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17 hours ago, Robin M said:

Dropped by Barnes and Noble's today.  Seems my randoms picks lead me in the direction of books with dogs on the cover. Picked up two romances - Casey Griffin's Must Love Weiners ? as well as Jill Shavis Animal Magnetism.  Made it a trio with Patricia Brigg's Burn Bright.   The clerk made my day when she said "I just loooove books with doggies on the cover."  ?

Forced myself to stop at three.  Going in without a list and randomly looking resulted in drooling over many attractive covers.  

 

I have read and enjoyed a few of the books in the Animal Magnetism series.  I suspect doggies on the cover does sell books....I like doggies on covers myself!

 I need to get back to my Patricia Briggs reread so I can finally read Burn Bright.  I decided to save it as a reward for the reread......

13 minutes ago, Violet Crown said:

I have to re-roll occasionally, too. Sometimes I get one of dh's books, like A Brief Introduction to Some Elementary Considerations in Meta-Propositional Analytic Theory, or A Compendium of the Most Bewildering Experimental Science Fiction, or something in untranslated Greek, and I try again. After spending a few moments wishing I were smarter and better educated.

? well my rejects were either too fluffy (nice way of saying x rated )or in modern foreign languages.

I finished Murder in Containment which was my latest Anne Cleeland.  I have to say this series has grown on me.  I will be reading the next but plan to intentionally take a break.  It would be very easy to read them all in a row!

When I returned Murder in Containment to the Prime library I was able to check out Melissa Olson’s Shadow Hunt which I am looking forward to.

It’s still too warm to quilt so I haven’t been listening to my audiobooks.  Dh and I enjoyed taking our recycling to the tip because we can make the temperature cold in the car for a few minutes!  I have several books started and can’t seem to settle on one.

I think the photo posting issue has to do with the size of the photo.  I was able to post directly from my iPad far larger photos than the now required .49mb since the new board ?My problem yesterday appears to have been too many existing attachments, that cache is cleared, now my size is too large.  

 

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21 hours ago, mumto2 said:

I took a photo today of DS and a giant fossil we found at Runswick Bay today and can’t seem to post it in the easy new board way.  I hope they didn’t change that feature.  I can’t remember how I was doing it but know I was posting giant pictures without a url which appears to be needed now.  ?  I can barely move the huge hunk of stone and the lad carried it out in the Sonlight tote bag I had my iPad in.  They really were sturdy bags!  We think it is an ammonite or something similar.  

 

Yes -- the settings have changed for posting photos -- you have to put them in Flickr or similar service and add them via a link. *sigh.*   I have some photos I'd like to upload but have been slowed down by the extra step.  And I want to see the fossil - or show the pic to my ds who is home now!!!  And btw, I wasn't grossed out by the 1st Stephen Booth book, but never got around to looking for and trying any others. The Anna Cleeland books however had a huge yuck factor -- the older DI and the young DC. It wasn't the age -- it was the way it was handled, like he was stalking her, grooming her (in my memory it seems far worse than it probably was). I guess I want my genres separate -- I'll accept a certain amount of creepy love in a beach read romance, but not in a police procedural!

Thank you to Kareni for the link to the Tor column about the original Pooh books. I have my childhood books still, and they are treasured favorites!

I had a very special weekend! Oldest ds drove our youngest ds home from the LA airport Friday night. For a brief time the entire family unit was together under one roof. We all had breakfast Saturday morning, then dh and I crawled our way up the freeway to downtown LA for a birthday getaway. We saw ELO in concert at the Forum on Saturday night -- it was exceptionally good, a blast from the past played by a group of excellent musicians with eye popping lighting. Before driving home Sunday morning we went to a funky bookstore that is in an old bank building, complete with columns. The two bank vaults are used, too -- one houses rare books and the other a collection of horror titles. I bought a nice stack of mysteries hard to find in my library system: an Ann Cleeves Vera title, two by the Icelandic author Arnaldur Indridason, one of which is the first in a new series with a new detective. Lets see, another new to me author Denise Mina. All of that and a GK Chesterton classic, The Man who was Thursday. And a cool 1000 piece puzzle of a photo of the bookshop. 

Not much reading going on except for listening to the first in an epic fantasy trilogy, The Black Prism. It is just o.k, nothing I'd recommend, but it fits the bill for something to listen to while driving or doing stuff.

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1 hour ago, JennW in SoCal said:

 

Yes -- the settings have changed for posting photos -- you have to put them in Flickr or similar service and add them via a link. *sigh.*   I have some photos I'd like to upload but have been slowed down by the extra step.  And I want to see the fossil - or show the pic to my ds who is home now!!!  And btw, I wasn't grossed out by the 1st Stephen Booth book, but never got around to looking for and trying any others. The Anna Cleeland books however had a huge yuck factor -- the older DI and the young DC. It wasn't the age -- it was the way it was handled, like he was stalking her, grooming her (in my memory it seems far worse than it probably was). I guess I want my genres separate -- I'll accept a certain amount of creepy love in a beach read romance, but not in a police procedural!

Thank you to Kareni for the link to the Tor column about the original Pooh books. I have my childhood books still, and they are treasured favorites!

I had a very special weekend! Oldest ds drove our youngest ds home from the LA airport Friday night. For a brief time the entire family unit was together under one roof. We all had breakfast Saturday morning, then dh and I crawled our way up the freeway to downtown LA for a birthday getaway. We saw ELO in concert at the Forum on Saturday night -- it was exceptionally good, a blast from the past played by a group of excellent musicians with eye popping lighting. Before driving home Sunday morning we went to a funky bookstore that is in an old bank building, complete with columns. The two bank vaults are used, too -- one houses rare books and the other a collection of horror titles. I bought a nice stack of mysteries hard to find in my library system: an Ann Cleeves Vera title, two by the Icelandic author Arnaldur Indridason, one of which is the first in a new series with a new detective. Lets see, another new to me author Denise Mina. All of that and a GK Chesterton classic, The Man who was Thursday. And a cool 1000 piece puzzle of a photo of the bookshop. 

Not much reading going on except for listening to the first in an epic fantasy trilogy, The Black Prism. It is just o.k, nothing I'd recommend, but it fits the bill for something to listen to while driving or doing stuff.

I am glad you weren’t grossed out by The Black Dog.  I was........so far I like the second book.  I really want to like this series.  Regarding the Anne Cleeland books,  I am not sure you made it into the series but they become rather addictive.  I can’t explain why but they are a great page turning escape.  Also Doyle seems to charm every male she meets so I have ceased to feel she is trapped in a weird situation.

I think I just read your new Indridason,  The Shadow District.  It was good!  

ELO,  What a fun birthday getaway!  

And now look at this fossil that my DS carried a very long way and up a hill.  I learned how to wash my photo via email on my iPad and it appears to have worked.  What does your son think it is? 

ETA.....It worked.......for people who aren’t fossil hunters looking at this the rock, it needs to be split.  It is in the garage until we have a chance to get a friend to do it.  I was thinking of it as a garden ornament but the boys put it in the garage.

Here is a link to how I resized my photo https://discussions.apple.com/thread/8271601

DB2A9640-6292-4151-80C4-B16C3607C098.jpeg

Edited by mumto2
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27 minutes ago, mumto2 said:

And now look at this fossil that my DS carried a very long way and up a hill

What a neat find!

2 hours ago, JennW in SoCal said:

Thank you to Kareni for the link to the Tor column about the original Pooh books. I have my childhood books still, and they are treasured favorites!

You are quite welcome, Jenn. 

I also see a movie review has been posted on Tor's site ~ 

I Have A Lot of Feelings About Christopher Robin  by Emily Asher-Perrin

Regards,
Kareni

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I haven't been posting because even though I've been reading I haven't finished much of anything.

Last night was book club and I went even though I didn't finish the book, Next Year in Havana. I had a really hard time with it and probably won't finish now that I don't feel like I have to. I rarely like first person pov and the present tense made it even harder to get into (the author didn't even use one type of present tense, but mixed two and sometimes three). Both first person and present tense are difficult to do and it takes a really good writer to pull it off. This author isn't in that category. I also thought it was too pedantic. The dialogue between characters was stilted because too often she was trying to use their conversations to teach the reader. It just didn't flow. And yet, it has a lot of 4 and 5 star reviews on numerous sites and gets praise from reviewers. Few others in the club liked either it but I think I disliked it the most. 

Was it last week or the week before that Trollope was mentioned?  See, I do read the threads but just haven't posted much ?. Anyway, I very much enjoyed the first three Barsetshire novels but found Framley Parsonage to be a bit of a slog at first. I kept going though and am finally enjoying it so I'm glad I stuck with it. My favorite Trollope is still the stand-alone The Way We Live Now, but I hope to finish Barsetshire then move on to Palliser. Okay, technically they're all stand alone novels because you can read any of the serial ones on their own, but hopefully you all know what I meant.

I recently read another Inspector Montalbano novel, The Smell of the Night. It's been a while since I read one of these and I realized how much I like them. The translator has to get some credit for being able to translate the humor so well. He even does a great job with the malapropisms that one character is known for even though the Italian word mix-ups might be very different from the English translation. I'll probably start the next one soon. 

I've been in the mood for a good literary novel that takes place in the present day (or at least this century) but can't find one that appeals to me at the moment.

Oh, and I'm still listening to the audio version of Washington: A Life, but am nearing the end with only about 2-1/2 hours to go.

 

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Hello to all.  I haven't been posting but I've been reading here and adding to my to-read list.  @mumto2I love the fossil! That's amazing!  @JennW in SoCal, love the story of your weekend!  All my family would love to see ELO.  Even the kids, they are 80s music lovers.  

Still not getting too much reading done.  Do I remember correctly that someone else here abandoned Magpie Murders@Lady Florida.?  I was loving it - I want more Atticus Pund! - but then the switch came and I couldn't maintain interest. I hate wasting book time like that.

I did start reading The Man With A Load of Mischief and am enjoying that!  I thought it might help me with Brit-Tripping but I already have that county.  I'm also listening to The Trespasser by Tana French. I  had read the book and am now doing an audio re-read. I love her books so much. 

Working has taken a toll on my reading but I seem to be in denial about it.  I keep getting books from the library (most recently Black Dog by Stephen Booth!), then returning them unread. I'm also missing my typical bedtime reading two nights a week - I work till 1am, get home about 1:30, brush my teeth and wash my face in the kitchen and then sneak into bed - I find that I am exhausted but can't get right to sleep.  I assume it's because I'm not reading - bedtime reading is a lifelong habit. I've thought about making up a bed on the couch for those nights so I can read without waking my husband. We don't have enough bedrooms for me to have my own.  :-)   Even the kindle with low light can be disturbing.

Quote

discovered with the chunky books that if I read in small increments, that its too difficult to get into the story.  Large chunks of at least one hour uninterrupted reading makes it easier to keep track of who is who and absorb the story better. 

I agree. I've effectively abandoned War and Peace. I was trying to do a chapter a day, but I couldn't get into the story. I know I should have just committed to the book and read it rather than trying to stretch it out or turn it into a devotional reading.  :-)  

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Somehow, another month passed since my last post. How does that happen? Well, since that mid-year review, I’ve read another sixteen books — five novels, one play, seven works of graphic fiction, and three non-fiction titles:

Papergirls, Vol. 4 (Brian K. Vaughan; 2018. Graphic fiction.)
Y: The Last Man, Vol. 1: Unmanned (Brian K. Vaughan; 2003. Graphic fiction.) -- A reread after recommending the complete collection to my older daughter, who now loves it as much as I do.
The Cabin at the End of the World (Paul Tremblay; 2018. Fiction.) -- Wow! This was pretty incredible, but my favorite of his work remains A Head Full of Ghosts.
Bel Canto (Ann Patchett; 2001. Fiction.) -- This flawed but beautiful novel has been on my shelves for seventeen years. My older daughter and I read it in preparation for seeing the opera.
Victims of Duty (Eugène Ionesco; 1953. Drama.) -- Read this in advance of seeing Michael Shannon reprise his role as the Detective in the recent A Red Orchid production.
Redlands, Vol. 1 (Jordie Bellaire; 2018. Graphic fiction.)
Give Me Your Hand (Megan Abbott; 2018. Fiction.) -- As good as Fever and You Will Know Me.
Alone (Chabouté; 2008 (2017, English). Graphic fiction.) -- Chabouté's work is gorgeous.
An American Marriage (Tayari Jones; 2018. Fiction.) -- Once I began reading, it was difficult to set this book down.
Janesville: An American Story (Amy Goldstein; 2016. Non-fiction.)
Mockingbird, Vol. 1: I Can Explain (Chelsea Cain; 2016. Graphic fiction.)
Mockingbird, Vol. 2: My Feminist Agenda (Chelsea Cain; 2017. Graphic fiction.)
Park Bench (Chabouté; 2012 (2017, English). Graphic fiction.)
Midlife: A Philosophical Guide (Kieran Setiya; 2017. Non-fiction.)
20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (Jules Verne; 1870. (Trans. Anthony Bonner; 1962.) Fiction.) -- Read in anticipation of seeing the Lookingglass Theatre production.
Squeezed: Why Our Families Can’t Afford America (Alissa Quart; 2018. Non-fiction.

That brings my total to eighty-four books completed, to date.

Books XI and XII and Lectures 9 through 12 remain in my quest to read The Aeneid and finish Elizabeth Vandiver’s The Aeneid of Virgil. About two and half hours remain in my audiobook of Hope Never Dies (Andrew Shaffer; 2018), and about one hundred pages remain in Jessica Bruder’s Nomadland (2017).

Despite having a number of books in various states of unread, I pushed Squeezed (Alissa Quart; 2018) to the top of the pile because I must return it to the library later this month — right around the time I help move my youngest back to university and resume my academic-year position. From that book:

p. 114
Among other things, being middle-class is a matter of having access to certain goods and services. It’s not just the house or the car you can buy. This status is also more granular, reflecting refined varieties of knowledge and information: the middle class knows where to send their children to school, where to get medical treatment, child care, career advice or training, or other kinds of help. Perhaps most importantly, class status is about how you even find out about these things to begin with, which again brings us to “cultural capital.”

When I recall “cultural capital,” I think of my favorite theorist from when I was a graduate student, Pierre Bourdieu. Bourdieu theorized that capital extends beyond economics, encompassing credentials, skills, and tastes. Financial capital is convertible — if you have the latter, you can gain cultural capital through education. Then, if you have the former, you can convert that back into even more economic capital through the right social networks.

(Related articles here, here, here, here,and here.)

Janesville (Amy Goldstein), Squeezed (Alissa Quart), and Nomadland (Jessica Bruder) form a fascinating — and sobering — trilogy.

One of my reading resolutions for this year is to finish at least thirty non-fiction titles. In May, I misstated the goal as thirty-six, but when I revisited the original post, I was delighted to realize that I am within nine books of the goal. Admittedly, I have made less progress on Resolutions 1 (Read from the shelves) and 4 (Finish reading several books abandoned in 2017 (or *gulp* earlier)), but I remain upbeat about rereading at least one Vonnegut novel (Resolution 3; probably Sirens of Titan and likely for Banned Books Week) and completing a close reading of Moby Dick (Resolution 2).

From Chapter 41: Moby-Dick
Here, then, was this grey-headed, ungodly old man, chasing with curses a Job’s whale round the world, at the head of a crew, too, chiefly made up of mongrel renegades, and castaways, and cannibals — morally enfeebled also, by the incompetence of mere unaided virtue or right-mindedness in Starbuck, the invulnerable jollity of indifference and recklessness in Stubb, and the pervading mediocrity in Flask. Such a crew, so officered, seemed specially picked and packed by some infernal fatality to help him to his monomaniac revenge. How it was that they so aboundingly responded to the old man’s ire — by what evil magic their souls were possessed, that at times his hate seemed almost theirs; the White Whale as much their insufferable foe as his; how all this came to be — what the White Whale was to them, or how to their unconscious understandings, also, in some dim, unsuspected way, he might have seemed the gliding great demon of the seas of life, — all this to explain, would be to dive deeper than Ishmael can go. The subterranean miner that works in us all, how can one tell whither leads his shaft by the ever shifting, muffled sound of his pick?

In a neat bit of serendipity / synchronicity / synthesis, my reread of Moby Dick will follow my reread of 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. This time, I read the Anthony Bonner translation of Verne's novel, which features an introduction by Ray Bradbury in which he draws comparisons between the Nemo and Ahab. I have not been able to find the introduction online, but I did find a Bradbury essay in which he revisits some of the ideas.

And here are two of my commonplace book entries for 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea:

p. 90
“Captain Nemo,” I said to my host who had just stretched out on a divan, “this library would do honor to more than one palace on land, and I am really astounded to think that it travels with you into the ocean depths.”

“Where could one find greater solitude or silence, Professor?” replied Captain Nemo. “Can you boast of greater tranquility in your office at the museum?”

“No, Monsieur, and I must admit that it is very shabby alongside yours. Why, you have six or seven thousand books…”

“Twelve thousand, Monsieur Aronnax. These are my only ties with life on dry land….”

p. 187
“A cannibal can still be an honorable man,” replied Conseil, “just as a glutton can be honest. One doesn’t exclude the other.”

“That’s all very well, Conseil. I’ll even grant you that these cannibals are honorable and that they go about devouring their prisoners honorably. But since I don’t like the idea of being devoured, even honorably, I’ll stay on guard, for the commander of the Nautilus seems to be taking no precautions whatsoever. Now to work.”

 

Edited by Melissa M
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HI!  I found the lost audiobook of Jane Eyre, and funny thing, the reader is the same one I downloaded from Audible.  (I also found The Little Princess.)  I probably should not have signed up for Audible, but maybe I will be glad in the future.

So we are well into Jane Eyre, and the kids seem to be getting it.  One kid doesn't understand all the language, but she understands romance and mystery.  ? The other kid probably understands better, but finds it spooky.  Myself, having not read this book since I was a teen (though I say it was and probably still is my favorite book), I am enjoying it thoroughly.

Roughly a fifth of the way through my current Miss Manners book.  So far it is 99.5% irrelevant to my current situation, but still a fun read for me.  I may be weird.

Roughly halfway through Spy Camp (read-aloud with the kids).  Our nights are getting later and later as school approaches, and there are more days with no time to read.  I do hope to finish before school starts, and also to start a couple more "educational" read-alouds in the mean time.  We'll see.

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1 hour ago, marbel said:

 

Still not getting too much reading done.  Do I remember correctly that someone else here abandoned Magpie Murders@Lady Florida.?  I was loving it - I want more Atticus Pund! - but then the switch came and I couldn't maintain interest. I hate wasting book time like that.

 

Yes, that was me. I really wanted to like it but I couldn't.

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Kathy, I was going to recommend C. P. Snow's Strangers and Brothers series, but I keep forgetting that "this century" doesn't mean the 20th anymore. 

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Some bookish posts ~

This could be fun to do:  The Great Book Swap  by  Joanna Goddard

"A few weeks ago I saw an Instagram story by Eva Chen, where she and her husband swapped their favorite books. Isn’t that a cool idea? Would you ever do it? After all, a book can take you on an epic inner journey that’s almost impossible to share with someone who hasn’t read it too — like when you try to retell a dream out loud. (Um, you had to be there.) Curious to attempt it ourselves, Alex and I chatted last night and figured out the six books we’d swap…"
**

From the Word Wenches site:   Playing at Cards  by Susanna Kearsley
** 

10 Microhistory Books To Read This Summer  by Beulah Maud Devaney
** 

From the Guardian:   Best ‘brainy’ books of this decade
**

An interesting post from Amanda on the SBTB site (so some language).  These recommendations are for romances. 

 The Rec League: Slytherins Falling for Hufflepuffs
 

Regards,
Kareni
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Kareni, Thank you for the Microhistory link.  I have to admit it’s timely because it’s one of the Bingo Squares I am searching for.  Sadly I can’t find Mauve.......I plan to hunt for a few of the others later.

I finished The Mayor of Castorbridge last night.  I enjoyed quite a bit.  I have moved on to a Jacqueline Winspear  for my next audiobook.

I checked out the Patricia Briggs short story book again so I could start Moon Called when my hold arrives.  I read three stories this morning and quite enjoyed them.  I really liked one called Gray.

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9 minutes ago, mumto2 said:

Kareni, Thank you for the Microhistory link.  I have to admit it’s timely because it’s one of the Bingo Squares I am searching for.  Sadly I can’t find Mauve.......I plan to hunt for a few of the others later.


Ooo, I love microhistories!  I'll probably end up adding at least a few of those on Kareni's list to my TR list. :)

If you want any other suggestions, some of my favorites have been 1491, Banana and The Earth Moved (earthworms).  

 

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I finished C. P. Snow's Time of Hope, the first (in series order) of the Strangers and Brothers series, telling the first twenty-nine years of Eliot's life. Conveniently he grows up in Leicestershire, which means at last I'm caught up with the BritTrip bus. Continuing with Lyrical Ballads: I've finished the 1798 first volume and am ready for the 1800 second volume and the famous 1802 Preface -- the manifesto of the Romantic movement. I find myself trying, as I read, to put myself in the place of a reader two hundred years ago, experiencing these poems and Wordsworth's revolutionary ideas for the first time.

On then to Sheridan Le Fanu's Uncle Silas, briefly described by the editor as "a Victorian sensationalist novel set in Derbyshire." Just the ticket.

Edited by Violet Crown
Only two e's in Derbyshire
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22 hours ago, Kareni said:

Some bookish posts ~

This could be fun to do:  The Great Book Swap  by  Joanna Goddard

"A few weeks ago I saw an Instagram story by Eva Chen, where she and her husband swapped their favorite books. Isn’t that a cool idea? Would you ever do it? After all, a book can take you on an epic inner journey that’s almost impossible to share with someone who hasn’t read it too — like when you try to retell a dream out loud. (Um, you had to be there.) Curious to attempt it ourselves, Alex and I chatted last night and figured out the six books we’d swap…"
**

From the Word Wenches site:   Playing at Cards  by Susanna Kearsley
** 

10 Microhistory Books To Read This Summer  by Beulah Maud Devaney
** 

From the Guardian:   Best ‘brainy’ books of this decade
**

An interesting post from Amanda on the SBTB site (so some language).  These recommendations are for romances. 

 The Rec League: Slytherins Falling for Hufflepuffs
 

Regards,
Kareni

Karen, thanks for the links.  I'm afraid to swap with my hubby. He'd picked out the longest biography or war story he could find. ?

Cool fossil, mum. Kind of reminds me of a snail. 

 

 

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48 minutes ago, Robin M said:

Karen, thanks for the links.  I'm afraid to swap with my hubby. He'd picked out the longest biography or war story he could find. ?

I hear you, Robin.  I don't know what my husband would pick for me ... perhaps Master and Commander since he is a fan.  Earlier this summer, I handed my husband a copy of Anne Bishop's Written in Red.  He's now read the first four books in the Others series and has quite enjoyed them which pleases me.

11 hours ago, mumto2 said:

Kareni, Thank you for the Microhistory link.

You are quite welcome.

11 hours ago, Matryoshka said:

Ooo, I love microhistories!  I'll probably end up adding at least a few of those on Kareni's list to my TR list. :)

I'm glad to have been of help.  I'll look forward to hearing about your selections.

Regards,
Kareni

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Some recent reads here ~

I just finished  Salt Magic Skin Magic  by Lee Welch which I quite enjoyed; it is a historical paranormal fantasy romance which had some twists that I did not foresee.  I suspect this is a book I'll be re-reading.  (Adult content)  

@mumto2 Hedgehog alert! 

"Lord Thornby has been trapped on his father’s isolated Yorkshire estate for a year. There are no bars or chains; he simply can’t leave. His sanity is starting to fray.

When industrial magician John Blake arrives to investigate a case of witchcraft, he finds the peculiar, arrogant Thornby as alarming as he is attractive. John soon finds himself caught up in a dark fairytale, where all the rules of magic—and love—are changed.

To set Thornby free, both men must face life-changing truths—and John must accept that the brave, witty man who’s winning his heart may also be about to break it. Can they escape a web of magic that’s as perilous as love?"
**

I also read Becoming Alpha (Alpha Girl Book 1)  by Aileen Erin which I'd describe as a young adult paranormal story.  I enjoyed it, but it's the first of eight (so far) books and I'm not sure whether I'll continue.

"One stupid party. One stupid boy. One stupid kiss. And my life was virtually over.

Tessa McCaide has a unique talent for getting into trouble. Then again, it isn’t easy for a girl with psychic visions to ignore what she sees. Luckily Tessa and her family are leaving California and moving halfway across the country, giving her the perfect opportunity to leave her reputation as “Freaky Tessa” behind.

But Tessa doesn’t realize that kissing the wrong guy in her new Texas town could land her in far more trouble than she ever imagined. Like being forced to attend St. Ailbe’s Academy, a secret boarding school for werewolves.

Even if the wrong guy did accidentally turn her into a shapeshifter and doom her to attending the weirdest high school ever, Tessa can’t help her growing attraction to the mysterious Dastien Laurent.

When vampires attack St. Ailbe’s and her visions pinpoint an enemy in their midst, Tessa realizes that boy drama and her newfound canine tendencies might just be the least of her problems."
**

I also read Max Hudson's contemporary romance Forget Me Not which dealt with the aftereffects of a brain injury/amnesia that caused a relationship to fail.  (Adult content)

"“I feel like I’m walking through somebody else’s life. I think we need to separate for a little while, at least until I can get my head around everything.”

Three years ago, Austin’s world came crashing down. After suffering a traumatic brain injury during a car accident, Noah, his lover of four years forgot who he was. The loss devastated Austin, leaving him unable to love anybody else. Now, on the verge of a new relationship with Mr. Perfect, Noah rides back into town a changed man. He’s nothing like the man Austin once loved, but that doesn’t seem to bother Austin’s heart or his body.

Noah tried for three years to forget the man who claimed to be the love of his life. After spending three years rediscovering himself, he’s ready to go back and face the one person he can’t remember, but his heart can’t seem to forget. The only problem is that he made a mess when he left, and Austin seems to have found somebody willing to take his place.

As the two draw closer to each other, they will both have to decide if they can let go of the past in order to build a future. When memories fade, can love still survive?"
**

and I re-read, with pleasure, Lyn Gala's alien romance Claimings, Tails, and Other Alien Artifacts  along with the author's Prelude to the same.  (Adult content)

Regards,
Kareni

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