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You're going to get a range of answers, depending on:
- how rigorous/relaxed the educational philosophy is
- whether or not there are LDs or other issues (which takes more time, or may limit time due to student concentration)
- whether or not doing outsourced classes (which take more time)
- whether or not you have activities on multiple days during the day (which disrupts concentration and makes academics take longer)
- and how motivated by academics the student is

You are likely to see anything from 4 hours to 7 hours, possibly even as much as 8 hours/day as an extreme for 8th grade. We averaged about 22-25 hours/week.

Our "back story explanation":
We managed about 5 to 5-1/4 hours/day 4x/week, and the 5th day of the week was a flex day/catch-up day, as roughly 2-3 weeks in a month, we only did 2 hours of academics on that 5th day, and the rest of that day was outside-the-home extracurriculars. For the other 1-2 weeks in a month, that 5th day was a full day of academics (about 4-5 hours). That is what worked for the 2 DSs here, who had little interest in school/academics/reading, with one DS having mild LDs that required about 20-30 min/day of extra work (which I included in that 5 to 5-1/4 hour time estimate), AND only had limited "brain energy" each day for doing school and actually retaining it.

The hours I listed are the actual focused work time (I *excluded* the fiddle-faddle and dawdling that always extended our actual school day length by 30-45 minutes in middle school years). We did NOT do evening homework or work on the weekends. We did NO outsourced classes or co-ops. We did NOT school in the summer. We did a full 36-week school year.

Edited by Lori D.
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Ds14 - Profound Dyslexia and Dyscalculia . 4 hour a day. Some days we get through it in less and some days more

this is the workload.

 Saxon math - Algebra 1/2  - 1 modified lesson per day - sometimes the lesson is broken up over 2 days with me adding in more math problems for extra practice on the topic

IEW - writing - mostly outlining at this stage - he is getting really good at it.

Spellling -AAS book 5 (nearly completed)

Science twice a week

 History twice a week

 reading from reading list of abridged versions of Medieval reading list

I read aloud to him form extra challenging reading list

grammar 

Logic once a week

we are just about to add in Vocab from Classical roots - orally 

is it as much as I would like to get done in a day - NO - but it is what Ds can get done in a day. I have to be realistic.

 

 

 

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30 minutes ago, Roadrunner said:

So 5-6 hours seems to me an average. By how much do you think the time increases in high school? 


Again, that is going to so WIDELY vary. I'd say *average* tends to run 5-6 hours/day for 8th grade, and 6-7/hours a day for high school.

But again, for high school you'll see a wide range -- 5 hours/day as a minimum (unless there are health issues or LDs requiring a lighter schedule), but I have seen a number of rigorous folk say they typically work 8 hours/day. Seems like the *average* for completing a college prep set of credits during high school runs between 6-7 hours/day. (And realize that it can possibly be a lighter amount of hours depending on what materials you use, how fast of a worker your student is -- or if you have fewer courses to have to accomplish during the high school years if your student brings up a credit or two from middle school, does a credit or two as summer school, or does dual enrollment.)

With the LDs and lower interest in academics, we usually managed about 5-1/2 to 6 hours/day, and were only had short days 1-2x/month. During high school, for several reasons we did some academics into the summer. We did sometimes do some of the Lit. reading in the evening, but not typically. We did not do evening or weekend homework. We did no online outsourced classes, and only did dual enrollment of 1 class per semester during each student's 12th grade year.

We also were not doing AP classes or studying for CLEP testing, and we limited the extra time we spent prepping for PSAT/ACT/SAT testing to the 2 months prior to the test, spending about 20-30 min/day 3x/week on test prep and practice. If doing any of those things, it can quickly increase your time per day.

 

ETA

30 minutes ago, Roadrunner said:

I am trying to wrap my head around our schedule. 


Rather than worrying about total amount of time or daily amount of time, I'd suggest looking at:
- are you accomplishing all of your goals
- are you using material that challenges but doesn't overwhelm your student

The amount of time will sort itself out, and the only worries there will be if you have a student who can only focus for so long. That was our DS#2 -- 45 min. of math was the limit of his focus, so that meant we stopped then, and looped the rest of the lesson to the next day. That meant going into the summer to finish. So we did that. Oh well, that was our reality.

In high school, you'll probably want to accomplish about 24 credits during the course of high school. That comes out to an average of 6 credits per year, and 1 credit roughly = 45-60 min/work per day for 180 days (36 weeks) of school). That comes out to roughly 4.5 to 6 hours of work per day. Some credits will likely take you a bit more than the average (difficulty of higher Maths; the reading of the Lit; Science due to the labs and factual info/processes to learn; Foreign Language acquisition, etc.). If you are finding it takes 2 hours to do Math, then either spread it out over a longer period of time (like, go over the summer) or consider an easier Math that is a better fit for your student. If Math is only taking 30 minutes, then consider a more challenging Math. If you are spending 10 hours a week on Lit. & Writing, then back off on the amount of reading and schedule more time for the Writing. Etc.

High school scheduling is more about quality of time, rather than quantity of time, IMO.

Edited by Lori D.
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I’m aiming for around 5 hours for my 8th grader this year. Roughly 45 minutes to an hour per subject, but language arts has a bunch of components still, which may not take long separately but together may add up to 90 minutes, maybe two hours. He’s a hard worker but prone to headaches if he concentrates too long on any one thing. I’m hoping to get him to 6-7 hours for high school, but it will depend on what electives he chooses. 

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15 minutes ago, happypamama said:

I’m hoping to get him to 6-7 hours for high school, but it will depend on what electives he chooses. 


See my ETA to the post above -- it's not so much about the hours, but about accomplishing your goals while challenging but not overwhelming your student. The hours work themselves out. : )

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3 minutes ago, Lori D. said:


See my ETA to the post above -- it's not so much about the hours, but about accomplishing your goals while challenging but not overwhelming your student. The hours work themselves out. : )

 

I am just wondering what it looks like for boardies. I am not basing my goals on their hours. I am just curious to see how we fit in. It gives me perspective.

Edited by Roadrunner
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Thanks for clarifying. : ) Way too often I see this head in the direction of comparison and poster start beating themsevles up for "not doing as much as everyone else". (:0  I just wanted to make sure you knew it was okay for there to be wide variations. : )

Edited by Lori D.
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1 hour ago, Roadrunner said:

So 5-6 hours seems to me an average. By how much do you think the time increases in high school? 

I am trying to wrap my head around our schedule. 

I agree with around 6 hours.  Because ds has extracurrics and co-op on alternate Fridays (babysitting the other week), I do expect he will work evenings and weekends sometimes.  I am telling him to expect 30 hours a week.

High school is more at my house.  By senior year ds was doing around 40 hours a week.  I would say dd, as a freshmen last year, did at least 35--she is a very efficient worker and didn't work many evenings and few weekends bc she gets up at 7 and gets started in order to avoid them.

 

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Actually, I found it a good idea, in my house to have the occasionally have to "finish" something not finished at night or on the weekend, bc it got my ds out of the "school should never happen at those times" mindset which meant if anything interrupted our schedule--even a sudden social event which he really wanted to attend--he would balk.  It "allowed" me to say yes to some spontaneous things when I knew it was a given that work got done even if it happened at night or on Sat. sometimes.  If I am honest, though, online classes helped the most with this.

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We are finding that after sports kids are too tired to go back to school work. I am starting to really admire the grit of student athletes in public schools. My kids can still read in the evening, but their brains are too tired to get any quality work done after 7 PM especially after 3 hour physical workout. 

I think we might need to really cut out sports in our house if everything is to get accomplished. I am having a hard time letting go of things. 

 

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37 minutes ago, Roadrunner said:

I think we might need to really cut out sports in our house if everything is to get accomplished. I am having a hard time letting go of things. 


Totally understand!

When our DSs were on the public high school tennis team, I just scaled back what work we did for the 12 weeks of tennis in spring, and tried to "front load" the school year by getting more of the work done in the fall, but also to just plan to work into the summer to finish up what didn't happen during the tennis season.

Edited by Lori D.
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39 minutes ago, Roadrunner said:

We are finding that after sports kids are too tired to go back to school work. I am starting to really admire the grit of student athletes in public schools. My kids can still read in the evening, but their brains are too tired to get any quality work done after 7 PM especially after 3 hour physical workout. 

I think we might need to really cut out sports in our house if everything is to get accomplished. I am having a hard time letting go of things. 

 

Is it three hours or nothing? I just got the schedule for the school DS is going to in the fall—sports end at 5. 

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42 minutes ago, Roadrunner said:

We are finding that after sports kids are too tired to go back to school work. I am starting to really admire the grit of student athletes in public schools. My kids can still read in the evening, but their brains are too tired to get any quality work done after 7 PM especially after 3 hour physical workout. 

I think we might need to really cut out sports in our house if everything is to get accomplished. I am having a hard time letting go of things. 

 

Could they go to bed earlier and start earlier in the day?  Or just assume work on Saturday?

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2 minutes ago, Roadrunner said:

 

Its one hour drive included. By the time we get there, 2 hours workout, then back, it’s three hours. 

Ugh. Yes the driving will kill me too. 

But i’m reluctant to let a teen go without any sort of exercise. So when we weren’t doing sports he was running a tiny bit everyday. 

Edited by madteaparty
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We are a sports family too. dd --my 8th grader practices 5 days a week. 2.5 hour practices plus an hour drive time...it makes a difference. My 8 year old works out 25 hours a week (she is a gymnast)...not sure what upper levels of academics will look like for her...

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1 hour ago, ByGrace3 said:

We are a sports family too. dd --my 8th grader practices 5 days a week. 2.5 hour practices plus an hour drive time...it makes a difference. My 8 year old works out 25 hours a week (she is a gymnast)...not sure what upper levels of academics will look like for her...

 

See at this point we know we won’t be going in as athletes (recruited type for college), so since we are only going to pursue recreationally, I think for us it makes sense to cut out a chunk of time from sports and give it back to schoolwork. 

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10 hours ago, Roadrunner said:

 

See at this point we know we won’t be going in as athletes (recruited type for college), so since we are only going to pursue recreationally, I think for us it makes sense to cut out a chunk of time from sports and give it back to schoolwork. 

I can totally understand that. My kids haven't decided yet....they are capable and talented enough...but older dd hasn't made the commitment really...we just talked about it last week. If she wants to look towards a scholarship, she needs to up practices to all of the optional ones too... I doubt she will...my guess is she will remain lightly competitive --just for fun. It's a lot of commitment for a recreational activity--but it is great exercise and I believe the commitment and involvement with the team is super beneficial at this point...

As for my  younger one...her aim is set high...she is 8. I have no expectations from her, but she is amazingly talented, the hardest worker I have ever seen . . . but she is just getting to upper levels of gymnastics now...we shall see how it goes. 

All that to say, we aren't committed to being college athletes, and that said, I am not comfortable sacrificing academics at this point...so we forge forward in pursuit of both...until it is no longer possible...and then academics will win. 

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We are starting 8th next week. I wrote out all the subjects I want to do and how much daily time I thought they should get and came up with 7 hrs a day. Then I complicated it with 3 hours a week for co-op.

 

Edited by SusanC
Intelligibility
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1 hour ago, SusanC said:

We are starting 8th next week. I wore it all the subjects I want to do and how much daily time I thought they should get and came up with 7 hrs a day. Then I complicated it with 3 hours a week for co-op.

 


Totally JMO: unless your students are really enjoy academic studies (and many do), and they already are used to long homeschool days in elementary and early middle school, 7 hours is getting pretty long for 8th grade. Homeschool allows for very focused study and one-on-one, so you usually don't need such long hours. Public schools average between 6.25 and 7.0 hours a day -- and that includes a good hour or more for lunch + "passing periods". And of course, a lot of that is wasted time due to nature of classroom learning versus the one-on-one of homeschool. And often one of the periods is PE, which is doing something physical rather than mental/academic. Again, JMO, but keep one eye on how your 8th grader is doing with this type of schedule so you don't burn out your student on academics before getting very far into high school, much less getting to college. ; )

re: co-op
JMO: co-op should either be able to take the place of some of the academics or be a supplement to the homeschool academics, rather than being piled *on top* of a full load of academics at home -- so a co-op takes the place of some of of the homeschool subjects, allowing for dropping or abridging one or more lessons/resources during the week to make room for co-op. If the co-op is all enrichment of activities that are not related to the academic subjects, there is still the need to make time for co-op without over-stuffing the schedule, so either go ahead and abridge/drop material from the weekly homeschool schedule to make room your week to make room, or plan to go into the summer if there is a high need for *having* do every single book and question/problem of every single lesson for every last subject.

Again, JMO, and please disregard my post if not a fit with your family's lifestyle. Wishing you all smooth schedules and a great 8th grade year! Warmest regards, Lori D.

Edited by Lori D.
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22 hours ago, Roadrunner said:

 My kids can still read in the evening, but their brains are too tired to get any quality work done after 7 PM especially after 3 hour physical workout. 

 

DS13 did a very light 8th grade year not because of time spent in recreational sports but because he just needed lots of sleep for his growth spurt/teen fog. He is also a night owl so he woke up near noon and slept after 11pm. 

Per week he spent about 

Chemistry - 8 to 10 hrs

Physics - 4 to 8 hrs (the longer time is for lab weeks)

Math - 10 hrs (WOOT and Linear Algebra)

German - 3.5 to 5 hrs (class and homework)

Chinese - 3 hrs (Lesson with tutor and homework)

English - 2 hrs (WTMA Socratic which he didn’t like but DS12 liked), Roy Speed Shakespeare (which he loves and would wake up early for)

So 30.5 hrs a week spread over seven days as DS13 likes doing some work on weekends.  

ETA:

He didn’t do any formal Arts or Music lessons/classes. German and Chinese were done at recreational pace as we won’t doing for high school credit counting for state universities. 

Edited by Arcadia
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3 hours ago, SusanC said:

We are starting 8th next week. I wrote out all the subjects I want to do and how much daily time I thought they should get and came up with 7 hrs a day. Then I complicated it with 3 hours a week for co-op.

 

?

7  hours seems ideal to me especially given that my children are sloooow workers. 

And then I need add 3 hours of transition/bathroom time in my house. It’s amazing how long a person can sit in a bathroom. ?

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Good to keep in mind the difference between my paper plan and reality. Similar to your bathroom story, I've been surprised at how long transition time is for subjects. I hand you the book for the next subject, no change of classroom required (same seat at the kitchen table), and it still takes 15 minutes to get started. LOL I am thinking that when I came up with my time estimates for this year I may have included some "transition" time.

Lori D., in her wisdom, is causing me to take a closer look at my schedule to see where I can pare things down. My dc are sweet and compliant, but that probably means that if I let us get to burn-out it will come fast and hard. I think I will prioritize all the subjects and cut time off the bottom half of the list.

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I think it is very hard to make an accurate estimate if you don’t have a schoolroom of sorts where everyone is together most of the time and you can see how much time they are actually on task. 

Also I have seen a lot of people add up hours and count time for things like practicing piano and time spent reading. But reading is tricky because when some kids this age read only exactly what is assigned for school and so maybe parent needs to actually assign more reading, where other kids are very active readers and read many hours per week outside of what is required, so their time strictly spent on assignments may be less but may be in reality spending a lot more time on their education. Some parents count their kids’ creative writing as part of school, others don’t.  

My best guess is 25 hours per week averaged over the course of the year for solid academics, but that could be wildly off.

 

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38 minutes ago, Roadrunner said:

And then I need add 3 hours of transition/bathroom time in my house. It’s amazing how long a person can sit in a bathroom. 

 

DS13 time sucker is cooking and eating. He eats every two to three hours (since he was a baby) and he cooks his own meals as he is a picky eater. Now he is trying to perfect pan frying frozen gyoza, then he might proceed to try and make his own gyozas. 

DS12 is the one that can spend time in the bathroom. For him it is a combination of his sensitive digestive system and him doing “facials” and hair styling in the bathroom. He would have a lighter workload than DS13 for 8th grade 2018/19 as he works at a slower pace and need more time than DS13 for any memory work (mainly German and Chinese vocabulary).

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38 minutes ago, SusanC said:

Good to keep in mind the difference between my paper plan and reality. Similar to your bathroom story, I've been surprised at how long transition time is for subjects. I hand you the book for the next subject, no change of classroom required (same seat at the kitchen table), and it still takes 15 minutes to get started. LOL I am thinking that when I came up with my time estimates for this year I may have included some "transition" time.

Lori D., in her wisdom, is causing me to take a closer look at my schedule to see where I can pare things down. My dc are sweet and compliant, but that probably means that if I let us get to burn-out it will come fast and hard. I think I will prioritize all the subjects and cut time off the bottom half of the list.


(:D

38 minutes ago, SusanC said:

...I've been surprised at how long transition time is for subjects. I hand you the book for the next subject, no change of classroom required (same seat at the kitchen table), and it still takes 15 minutes to get started...


Interesting point to bring up, SusanC! Just because we don't need a *physical* transition of location, doesn't mean we don't need a *mental* transition to effectively "change gears" and take a break to re-energize between subjects. (:D

Researchers are finding that adults in the workplace are most productive if they work for approximately 40-50 minutes, and then take a 10-15 minute break. While we can often "hyper focus" on a topic for an extended period of time, most people do better overall with shorter bursts of concentrated activity, and then take a stretch break. Kids probably need this even more than adults. (:P

Edited by Lori D.
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23 hours ago, Roadrunner said:

So 5-6 hours seems to me an average. By how much do you think the time increases in high school? 

I am trying to wrap my head around our schedule. 

 

My high schoolers are using Sonlight this year.  DS15 timed it yesterday.  It was 4.5 hours.  That included math/foreign language.  My kids work continuously, though.  They don't dawdle and they don't take breaks.  They'll even read while they're eating.

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My rising 10th grader spent about 3 hrs / day on school when she was in 8th grade. She is motivated and efficient. I always give her what I think is a (fairly) rigorous course load, so I don't stress about the hours. Her brother will spend more like 4-4.5 hrs completing a similar work load. 

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7 minutes ago, Roadrunner said:

I should add all the teatime as well (typing as I am watching my youngest brewing tea). ? 

 

I can empathize with you.  We have the  Breville Temp Select electric cordless kettle and DS13 has to try all the temperature settings to see which ones are best for green tea teabag, matcha green tea latte powder, spiced chai powder, english teatime teabag, chinese tea leaves.

The temperature settings on our kettle are:

Green White (175 degF)

Oolong (195 degF)

French Press (200 degF)

Black Herbal (205 degF)

Boil (212 degF)

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