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"What can I use for homeschooling that is free and all online and requires no parent interaction and reads outloud becaus the child can't read"

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Though I absolutely agree that not everyone should homeschool and public school is many times a better option, I would also say be careful to judge whether someone else should do it or not. The only thing that matters is the child gets the best option they can. I also think we should try to figure out more of this as a society so there are options for those who just can't swing it on their own.

Currently, our school district is dealing with another abuse investagation. The teacher slammed the child against the wall hard enough to bruise the child's back and head. This isn't a first for our district.  We as a society expect ridiculous things from our teachers. They are supposed to be therapists, parents, teachers, coachs, and administrators of 30 children at once and then we wonder why they lose their mind.  

I know parents that weren't great homeschoolers who never wanted to homeschool in the first place but felt driven to it. I think this is more true for those with special needs. My step mom was trying to figure out why my little brother was regressing one year (after having a fabulous teacher and making a lot of progress the previous year) and  discovered that my little brother was spending most of his day playing Oregon Trail while the teacher and aid dealt with more severe behaivor issues in other students in his class. She was a good homeschool teacher but what if she wasn't or she didn't have the resources or you are a single parent and don't have the options she did? Sometimes a barely adequate or even inadequate education is better than their alternative. I do think there are also places with great options but a lot depends on the money and resources of the community you are in which typically correlates with your parents income also. 

There are also people who just want the best of everything and want it for free and contribute nothing.  I'm not trying to conflate the two. 

Edited by frogger
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Don't anybody go copyrighting the time/money/skills equation. (Or people frequently say "talent" instead of "skill.") It's been used around these boards for years. The oldest usage I could find here was one of my posts, but I probably heard it somewhere, too, but I can't remember whether or where. It's right up there with "Teach the child in front of you," as a Hive mind maxim.

Edited by Tibbie Dunbar
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15 hours ago, KungFuPanda said:

I think you’re right. High school isn’t just a little bit more expensive. It’s a huge leap. MAYBE if you are so well-rounded that you can teach every high school subject without a curriculum AND you happen to already own a lot of lab equipment AND you can find inexpensive books you can make it cheap. It would take so much work to truly do it all justice by yourself. 

 

Three of mine are teens and one is almost finished with high school.  We're actually doing a college tour this week.  High school hasn't been as bad as people make it out to be.  9th grade was just another year.  If your'e working with them consistently, their skills build on themselves.  Mine didn't suddenly make some huge leap in ability.  I don't spend thousands on curriculum and outsourced classes.  

Lab equipment -we've probably spent about $60-80 per year on science equipment.  I already owned a microscope, though.  And the things I bought are reusable when my younger kids take those courses.  We have done an incredible amount of science, so we may spend more than some people.  My oldest will have 7 science credits when she graduates.  That really is a lot of science.  

My biggest struggles have been with record-keeping.  I'm good at working with my kids, but not at keeping records.  Also, juggling all the extracurriculars and sports that they seem to want to do...  High school sports are a ridiculous time and money commitment.  It feels like I am constantly driving them somewhere.  I spend so much more money on sports than I do on curriculum.    

I just don't want people to read this thread and completely freak out (like I would've done a few years ago).  Lol.   

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4 hours ago, Carrie12345 said:

Well, if anyone does, I'd love to be given the right to include it in the book I tell myself I'm writing!  And I'm saying this "out loud" because I don't really care if anyone is motivated enough to steal my idea and get it done first; I happen to be an incredibly lazy writer and most of my ideas pitter out while I'm still outlining.

I do think the homeschool book genre needs an honest, accessible book.  I'm not saying the current works are DIShonest, but I think they're either written as encouragement or they fall into the how-to category that's read by people who are already eagerly rolling up their sleeves and ready to work. Admittedly, I haven't purchased any new homeschooling books in at least 5 years, but I don't believe there's one out there that comes right out and asks "Do you have the tools?"

Absolutely legitimate question to ask. And I like what you are saying about having those balance of tools. Then you run into the "will it sell books" issue with publishing.

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6 hours ago, Carrie12345 said:

Well, if anyone does, I'd love to be given the right to include it in the book I tell myself I'm writing!  And I'm saying this "out loud" because I don't really care if anyone is motivated enough to steal my idea and get it done first; I happen to be an incredibly lazy writer and most of my ideas pitter out while I'm still outlining.

I do think the homeschool book genre needs an honest, accessible book.  I'm not saying the current works are DIShonest, but I think they're either written as encouragement or they fall into the how-to category that's read by people who are already eagerly rolling up their sleeves and ready to work. Admittedly, I haven't purchased any new homeschooling books in at least 5 years, but I don't believe there's one out there that comes right out and asks "Do you have the tools?"

I’m working on this book. It’s quite a balance to encourage people while still giving them the accurate idea that it’s actual work and takes time.

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11 hours ago, Evanthe said:

 

Three of mine are teens and one is almost finished with high school.  We're actually doing a college tour this week.  High school hasn't been as bad as people make it out to be.  9th grade was just another year.  If your'e working with them consistently, their skills build on themselves.  Mine didn't suddenly make some huge leap in ability.  I don't spend thousands on curriculum and outsourced classes.  

Lab equipment -we've probably spent about $60-80 per year on science equipment.  I already owned a microscope, though.  And the things I bought are reusable when my younger kids take those courses.  We have done an incredible amount of science, so we may spend more than some people.  My oldest will have 7 science credits when she graduates.  That really is a lot of science.  

My biggest struggles have been with record-keeping.  I'm good at working with my kids, but not at keeping records.  Also, juggling all the extracurriculars and sports that they seem to want to do...  High school sports are a ridiculous time and money commitment.  It feels like I am constantly driving them somewhere.  I spend so much more money on sports than I do on curriculum.    

I just don't want people to read this thread and completely freak out (like I would've done a few years ago).  Lol.   

Well--I think the point is that if you can't keep it in house it costs a lot to outsource. The same goes for any parenting--daycare is expensive! So are haircuts, even the cheap one. It pays to be well-educated and organized. But certainly if you can do it yourself, you can save a lot. Not everyone has the skills or willingness.

 

Some kids also do spurt in ability or motivation. Some parents didn't have access to a decent HS education and are not equipped to teach algebra or geometry or chemistry. So it can really fall apart quickly.

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15 hours ago, Carrie12345 said:

Well, if anyone does, I'd love to be given the right to include it in the book I tell myself I'm writing!  And I'm saying this "out loud" because I don't really care if anyone is motivated enough to steal my idea and get it done first; I happen to be an incredibly lazy writer and most of my ideas pitter out while I'm still outlining.

I do think the homeschool book genre needs an honest, accessible book.  I'm not saying the current works are DIShonest, but I think they're either written as encouragement or they fall into the how-to category that's read by people who are already eagerly rolling up their sleeves and ready to work. Admittedly, I haven't purchased any new homeschooling books in at least 5 years, but I don't believe there's one out there that comes right out and asks "Do you have the tools?"

And also, do you have the TIME? When a lot of those books were written, I don’t think anyone could imagine someone WITHOUT the time and tools would even ATTEMPT this. It was also widely assumed that you had more than a passing interest in education. Back then I’d never even heard of a non-religious homeschooling parent who didn’t like to read and wasn’t interested in curriculum.  

Edited by KungFuPanda
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15 hours ago, Carrie12345 said:

I do think the homeschool book genre needs an honest, accessible book.  I'm not saying the current works are DIShonest, but I think they're either written as encouragement or they fall into the how-to category that's read by people who are already eagerly rolling up their sleeves and ready to work.

 

The book I want is the one Erma Bombeck would have written had she homeschooled.

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1 hour ago, idnib said:

 

The book I want is the one Erma Bombeck would have written had she homeschooled.

 

I have thought of her often, over the years, and wished for the same thing! She came to mind once, when I really felt like I was fooling myself and trying too hard, to introduce my blue collar family to the Great Conversation:

My son bragged to a lady at church that we were all reading The Count of Monty Crisco, by Alexander Dumbass.

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3 minutes ago, Tibbie Dunbar said:

 

I have thought of her often, over the years, and wished for the same thing! She came to mind once, when I really felt like I was fooling myself and trying too hard, to introduce my blue collar family to the Great Conversation:

My son bragged to a lady at church that we were all reading The Count of Monty Crisco, by Alexander Dumbass.

HA!  I have a kid or two I can absolutely picture saying something like that.  And with such pride and earnestness.?

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21 hours ago, Evanthe said:

 

Three of mine are teens and one is almost finished with high school.  We're actually doing a college tour this week.  High school hasn't been as bad as people make it out to be.  9th grade was just another year.  If your'e working with them consistently, their skills build on themselves.  Mine didn't suddenly make some huge leap in ability.  I don't spend thousands on curriculum and outsourced classes.  

Lab equipment -we've probably spent about $60-80 per year on science equipment.  I already owned a microscope, though.  And the things I bought are reusable when my younger kids take those courses.  We have done an incredible amount of science, so we may spend more than some people.  My oldest will have 7 science credits when she graduates.  That really is a lot of science.  

My biggest struggles have been with record-keeping.  I'm good at working with my kids, but not at keeping records.  Also, juggling all the extracurriculars and sports that they seem to want to do...  High school sports are a ridiculous time and money commitment.  It feels like I am constantly driving them somewhere.  I spend so much more money on sports than I do on curriculum.    

I just don't want people to read this thread and completely freak out (like I would've done a few years ago).  Lol.   

What's inexpensive to one person is still expensive to some others. In my area, we do have people who would not be able to keep their kids home without being enrolled in public cyber schools. The extra dollars just aren't there. I always justify my spending with "handing it down", but not everyone has multiple kids, either.

I spend a good bit on science (and have since before high school grades) because I'm not comfortable with my skills in that area.  I'm really good at following instructions, so I've paid a good deal for open-and-go as well as outsourcing. I do believe that, given enough available time, I could have improved my science skills to teach them directly, but it's been easier for me to manage 3 to 5 students by putting my time elsewhere and just paying for easier to implement sciences!

Ironically, I consider math before Alg II, and even some of Alg II, to be my strong suit. Except math has been a disaster with 2 of my kids. I never saw that one coming. (My first kid and I exist on the same wavelength.)  Putting dd in DE, even in a non-math class, now gives her access to unlimited, free math skills tutoring. ? So we found a possible solution that technically doesn't cost more, but we wouldn't have it without the cost of DE.  Creative problem solving is another helpful tool when other tools are limited!

 

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On 8/25/2018 at 6:16 PM, LMD said:

I agree, and I consider it my duty to tell new homeschoolers the truth. I remember one particularly memorable park day when I quite bluntly told some new homeschoolers that Yes, they should expect to teach algebra! I followed it up with honest encouragement but I certainly didn't hold back.

There is a lot of infighting in home ed groups I find. ? too many strong, uncompromising and odd personalities clashing!

I have sadly found that a lot of homeschoolers around here don't feel the "need" for their kids to learn any mathematics above arithmetic.  I know a lot of this stems from our area being full of poverty and they only see their kids going into factories ( I would say 60 percent or more people in this town work in factories). 

I personally feel that I am educating the future.....who knows what God has in store for them...and I want them to be prepared spiritually, behaviorly, educationally, and socially.  I want my kids to show love, intellect, and diligence to the world.

 

Brenda

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11 hours ago, Tsuga said:

Well--I think the point is that if you can't keep it in house it costs a lot to outsource. The same goes for any parenting--daycare is expensive! So are haircuts, even the cheap one. It pays to be well-educated and organized. But certainly if you can do it yourself, you can save a lot. Not everyone has the skills or willingness.

 

Some kids also do spurt in ability or motivation. Some parents didn't have access to a decent HS education and are not equipped to teach algebra or geometry or chemistry. So it can really fall apart quickly.

This is so true...

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1 hour ago, Carrie12345 said:

What's inexpensive to one person is still expensive to some others. In my area, we do have people who would not be able to keep their kids home without being enrolled in public cyber schools. The extra dollars just aren't there. I always justify my spending with "handing it down", but not everyone has multiple kids, either.

I spend a good bit on science (and have since before high school grades) because I'm not comfortable with my skills in that area.  I'm really good at following instructions, so I've paid a good deal for open-and-go as well as outsourcing. I do believe that, given enough available time, I could have improved my science skills to teach them directly, but it's been easier for me to manage 3 to 5 students by putting my time elsewhere and just paying for easier to implement sciences!

Ironically, I consider math before Alg II, and even some of Alg II, to be my strong suit. Except math has been a disaster with 2 of my kids. I never saw that one coming. (My first kid and I exist on the same wavelength.)  Putting dd in DE, even in a non-math class, now gives her access to unlimited, free math skills tutoring. ? So we found a possible solution that technically doesn't cost more, but we wouldn't have it without the cost of DE.  Creative problem solving is another helpful tool when other tools are limited!

 

 

There's a lot I would do if I had the funds, so I work with what is available to me. If that means going to a less rigorous online charter or correspondence school and then supplementing, I'll do it. There's so many workarounds out there to support parents who want to provide the education they imagine for their kids. They just have to be willing to think further outside the box. 

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There was a funny exchange yesterday on a Facebook group for a local cyber charter. A mom asked for curriculum recommendations for a particular situation, a couple of moms suggested a religiously based curriculum noting that because it was religious the school wouldn't pay for it but it was inexpensive, and a fourth mom jumped in to ask "so what do we have to do to get this curriculum paid for?"

Um, you pay out of pocket. As already stated.

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2 hours ago, maize said:

There was a funny exchange yesterday on a Facebook group for a local cyber charter. A mom asked for curriculum recommendations for a particular situation, a couple of moms suggested a religiously based curriculum noting that because it was religious the school wouldn't pay for it but it was inexpensive, and a fourth mom jumped in to ask "so what do we have to do to get this curriculum paid for?"

Um, you pay out of pocket. As already stated.

To be fair I think that question may have been more, "As a taxpayer I believe that public funds should allow people to buy religious curricula on an individual choice basis so what can I do to change that rule," rather than, "who is going to buy this for me". Still up for debate but not the same as passing off responsibility.

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Here's another one:

Guy wants to know where to find a cheap or free Latin curriculum because the cheapest he can find the LfC consumable book is $15 and he refuses to spend more than $10 on curriculum. Not can't afford it, just refuses to spend it.

When people encourage him to pay the extra $5 if LfC is working well for his kid, he responds that he googled and found something for free that he likes better and he's so glad because now he can sell his LfC for $20 to suckers like those posting on the thread. ?

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37 minutes ago, PeachyDoodle said:

Here's another one:

Guy wants to know where to find a cheap or free Latin curriculum because the cheapest he can find the LfC consumable book is $15 and he refuses to spend more than $10 on curriculum. Not can't afford it, just refuses to spend it.

When people encourage him to pay the extra $5 if LfC is working well for his kid, he responds that he googled and found something for free that he likes better and he's so glad because now he can sell his LfC for $20 to suckers like those posting on the thread. ?

I want to be in the room when he prices high school biology books. ?

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16 minutes ago, KungFuPanda said:

I want to be in the room when he prices high school biology books. ?

High school chemistry lab equipment....

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8 minutes ago, Meriwether said:

High school chemistry lab equipment....

Latin TEACHER when your past the DIY level and need qualified instruction to progress at a decent pace . . .

and in states like Maryland there’s driving school that’s non-public, non-optional, and expensive. 

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1 hour ago, KungFuPanda said:

I want to be in the room when he prices high school biology books. ?

 

1 hour ago, KungFuPanda said:

I want to be in the room when he prices high school biology books. ?

 

1 hour ago, Meriwether said:

High school chemistry lab equipment....

 

54 minutes ago, KungFuPanda said:

Latin TEACHER when your past the DIY level and need qualified instruction to progress at a decent pace . . .

and in states like Maryland there’s driving school that’s non-public, non-optional, and expensive. 

I know right! Several people said as much. Out of curiosity I had a look at his profile... and he's an AP teacher!

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2 minutes ago, PeachyDoodle said:

 

 

 

I know right! Several people said as much. Out of curiosity I had a look at his profile... and he's an AP teacher!

Uh, what??? 

ETA why would you not have curriculum from your school, and why would you have used LfC for AP or even high school??

Edited by Targhee

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11 minutes ago, Targhee said:

Uh, what??? 

ETA why would you not have curriculum from your school, and why would you have used LfC for AP or even high school??

I'm assuming the children for whom was looking are elementary age. Apparently he teaches at a school as well as homeschooling?

ETA: It wasn't AP Latin. I forget -- AP World History maybe?

Edited by PeachyDoodle
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3 hours ago, PeachyDoodle said:

Here's another one:

Guy wants to know where to find a cheap or free Latin curriculum because the cheapest he can find the LfC consumable book is $15 and he refuses to spend more than $10 on curriculum. Not can't afford it, just refuses to spend it.

When people encourage him to pay the extra $5 if LfC is working well for his kid, he responds that he googled and found something for free that he likes better and he's so glad because now he can sell his LfC for $20 to suckers like those posting on the thread. ?

I saw that one too, and it bugged me.  $5.  I love a good deal, but part of getting a good deal is knowing what is worth the extra few dollars and what isn't.  (And for the record, that guy isn't my father, but my dad was an AP teacher at a public school while also homeschooling his own children, my younger siblings.  Well, Mom did most of the homeschooling, but Dad helped, and he would have been the one looking for the deal.)

Edited by happypamama
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5 minutes ago, happypamama said:

I saw that one too, and it bugged me.  $5.  I love a good deal, but part of getting a good deal is knowing what is worth the extra few dollars and what isn't.  (And for the record, that guy isn't my father, but my dad was an AP teacher at a public school while also homeschooling his own children, my younger siblings.  Well, Mom did most of the homeschooling, but Dad helped, and he would have been the one looking for the deal.)

I only mentioned that because I was shocked that a teacher wouldn't place more value on his kids' education.

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On 8/22/2018 at 10:31 AM, Tsuga said:

I have never heard anyone with educated children suggest that homeschooling could be done in a fraction of the time you can do public school. The kid spends less time in transition but the parent will ALWAYS spend more because of prep time. I think the rule is 2:1 prep to instruction right?

I would tell people to plan for that. So for a kindergartener with 30 minutes of reading and 30 minutes of math,. You have two hours of prep (choosing books, understanding literacy, creating the environment, learning to cope with opposition). You're already exceeding 95% of public school time expectations.

I don't think I spend that much time planning kindergarten, unless you count browsing curriculum sales over the summer. But, I pick open and go stuff wherever possible. 

But now with a dyslexic student I have put in MANY hours of research, etc. But on a regular basis? No way. 

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4 hours ago, PeachyDoodle said:

I'm assuming the children for whom was looking are elementary age. Apparently he teaches at a school as well as homeschooling?

ETA: It wasn't AP Latin. I forget -- AP World History maybe?

Sounds almost incredible. Possibly a troll or someone who works as a grader or something for the College Board, but maybe is not a teacher. Someone with a bit of "inside" knowledge but not enough to make solid decisions. Also may be AP online and he sees the bulk cost of distributing online materials to thousands, without realizing that individual pricing for real books is a whole different ballgame?

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2 minutes ago, Tsuga said:

Sounds almost incredible. Possibly a troll or someone who works as a grader or something for the College Board, but maybe is not a teacher. Someone with a bit of "inside" knowledge but not enough to make solid decisions. Also may be AP online and he sees the bulk cost of distributing online materials to thousands, without realizing that individual pricing for real books is a whole different ballgame?

Possible. All I know is what's on his public Facebook page, which says he's an AP teacher employed by a school that also has a Facebook page and appears to have a physical location. But I will admit that I didn't spend more than about 20 seconds glancing at it. I think he was definitely stirring the pot, especially when he came back and berated the posters who'd tried to help. Maybe he was just unprepared for people to think that his arbitrary $10 rule was unhelpful.

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5 hours ago, PeachyDoodle said:

I only mentioned that because I was shocked that a teacher wouldn't place more value on his kids' education.

Oh, I agree!  

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I saw the $10 Latin book guy too and immediately thought of this thread. 

Tonight, on one of our state groups - “I’m new to homeschooling and need to find a free or cheap curriculum for my 9th grader.”

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9 hours ago, 2ndGenHomeschooler said:

I saw the $10 Latin book guy too and immediately thought of this thread. 

Tonight, on one of our state groups - “I’m new to homeschooling and need to find a free or cheap curriculum for my 9th grader.”

Even public school isn't free here...the kids spend more money on school supplies, uniforms for the 90 percent public funded private schools, school books run over a hundred to rent and most of the textbooks are actually online now, and they rent an IPAD yearly for a hundred dollars (although when they pushed them on the parents they said that they would be free...they did the same with HS computers).  I would bet 300 is low per student to send your child to the public school and it would be 1000 to send them to the public funded private school (I know that seems messed up, but in Indiana Christian school can apply and get up to 90 percent of each child's schooling covered through scholarship....low income....and 90 percent of our town is low income?)

It actually would cost me more to send my children to public school than it does for me to research, work hard, buy nonconsumable and awesome textbooks/ curriculum, purchase my choice of school supplies.....but I still spend some money, loads of time, and even more energy teaching my children.  So...I guess what I am getting at is that unless they were accepting state help for their books before (and here the IPADs and Computers that they require don't get subsidized...even those with free and reduced lunches pay for these now) they were paying for their children's education before so what makes them think it will be free now.  

When someone takes on full desire of educating their children they are also taking on the financial requirements.  

I have gotten this question many times and my answer is the following:

1. Are you asking this because you are temporarily low financially or because you really think that the state runs free education outside of the public sphere.....in Indiana they do not.

2. Why are you homeschooling?  

3. Find out what his/her philosophy of education is and direct them to a few places under their umbrella of structure.

Charlotte Mason....Simply Charlotte Mason and Ambleside Online.

Classical...Here ( everything here is so affordable even for low income families) and MFW to look and see if their investment of time is worth her investment of money.

Literature based....Sonlight...Robinson Curriculum

Textbooks...Rod and Staff...BJU.....Old Fashioned Education

Workbooks....Horizons....Abeka....Christian Light Education

 

Then let them go and research...this is very valuable to every home educator.

Brenda

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1 hour ago, homemommy83 said:

Even public school isn't free here...the kids spend more money on school supplies, uniforms for the 90 percent public funded private schools, school books run over a hundred to rent and most of the textbooks are actually online now, and they rent an IPAD yearly for a hundred dollars (although when they pushed them on the parents they said that they would be free...they did the same with HS computers).  I would bet 300 is low per student to send your child to the public school and it would be 1000 to send them to the public funded private school (I know that seems messed up, but in Indiana Christian school can apply and get up to 90 percent of each child's schooling covered through scholarship....low income....and 90 percent of our town is low income?)

It actually would cost me more to send my children to public school than it does for me to research, work hard, buy nonconsumable and awesome textbooks/ curriculum, purchase my choice of school supplies.....but I still spend some money, loads of time, and even more energy teaching my children.  So...I guess what I am getting at is that unless they were accepting state help for their books before (and here the IPADs and Computers that they require don't get subsidized...even those with free and reduced lunches pay for these now) they were paying for their children's education before so what makes them think it will be free now.  

When someone takes on full desire of educating their children they are also taking on the financial requirements.  

I have gotten this question many times and my answer is the following:

1. Are you asking this because you are temporarily low financially or because you really think that the state runs free education outside of the public sphere.....in Indiana they do not.

2. Why are you homeschooling?  

3. Find out what his/her philosophy of education is and direct them to a few places under their umbrella of structure.

Charlotte Mason....Simply Charlotte Mason and Ambleside Online.

Classical...Here ( everything here is so affordable even for low income families) and MFW to look and see if their investment of time is worth her investment of money.

Literature based....Sonlight...Robinson Curriculum

Textbooks...Rod and Staff...BJU.....Old Fashioned Education

Workbooks....Horizons....Abeka....Christian Light Education

 

Then let them go and research...this is very valuable to every home educator.

Brenda

I didn’t even bother responding. Too many other responses already suggesting Easy Peasy and Khan academy. I’m in a no regulation state so unschooling and extremely relaxed homeschooling are very popular. Most people who comment on these things push the quick/easy/cheap/free viewpoint, regardless of the age of the child.

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1 hour ago, 2ndGenHomeschooler said:

I didn’t even bother responding. Too many other responses already suggesting Easy Peasy and Khan academy. I’m in a no regulation state so unschooling and extremely relaxed homeschooling are very popular. Most people who comment on these things push the quick/easy/cheap/free viewpoint, regardless of the age of the child.

We have some regulation here but it's very light, and I see the same thing. Easy Peasy is THE answer to everything it seems.

I'm constantly seeing questions about high school science and people suggesting that labs aren't necessary, it's fine to just watch them online, etc. I sure hope none of these kids is planning a science career. I am not a science person, but we are just beginning our foray into high school-level science this year and I'm already fastidious about lab journals, reports, etc. because I know that dd will have to have these skills in place in order to pursue her desired degree. (BTW, if anyone is looking, Novare's lab report handbook is an EXCELLENT resource!) We will most likely outsource at least one or two classes to the community college just so she can have experience in an actual lab before college. 

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And another one asking for free online courses for middle school. ?

I see the “just watch labs online” thing too. I’m just starting 9th with my oldest but I thought half the point of labs was the process of actually doing them. I say that as a homeschool graduate whose only lab was dissecting a frog. 

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5 minutes ago, 2ndGenHomeschooler said:

And another one asking for free online courses for middle school. ?

I see the “just watch labs online” thing too. I’m just starting 9th with my oldest but I thought half the point of labs was the process of actually doing them. I say that as a homeschool graduate whose only lab was dissecting a frog. 

The thing is, a lot of those online public schools just have kids watching labs online now.  Or at least doing these virtual labs where you use a mouse to change a variable and then see the result.  I looked this up to make sure, and it is also happening in brick and mortar schools as well.  I'm not saying that it is good teaching but it isn't just homeschoolers. 

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1 minute ago, PeachyDoodle said:

We have some regulation here but it's very light, and I see the same thing. Easy Peasy is THE answer to everything it seems.

I'm constantly seeing questions about high school science and people suggesting that labs aren't necessary, it's fine to just watch them online, etc. I sure hope none of these kids is planning a science career. I am not a science person, but we are just beginning our foray into high school-level science this year and I'm already fastidious about lab journals, reports, etc. because I know that dd will have to have these skills in place in order to pursue her desired degree. (BTW, if anyone is looking, Novare's lab report handbook is an EXCELLENT resource!) We will most likely outsource at least one or two classes to the community college just so she can have experience in an actual lab before college. 

Yes, apparently Easy Peasy is THE answer for every child at every level! There is a woman on one of my groups whose kids were in an online public school which got shut down in the middle of the year by the state (for fraud). Other online schools couldn't take all the misplaced students, so many began homeschooling. When this woman writes, the grammar, spelling, and vocabulary are so bad that it's hard to understand what she's saying. It's kind of scary that she's homeschooling her children. When anyone asks about curriculum, she chimes in every single time and recommends Easy Peasy for every situation.  It drives me crazy!

High school science may be the toughest subject to teach at home. DS is extremely unlikely to pick a science major at this point, but I want to leave him options. I can't afford to outsource much and did a combination of online and simple home based biology labs last year. For chemistry, we are fortunate enough to have a family member who is a chemist with access to a real lab and he is teaching the lab part for us and only charging for materials.

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2 hours ago, 2ndGenHomeschooler said:

I didn’t even bother responding. Too many other responses already suggesting Easy Peasy and Khan academy. I’m in a no regulation state so unschooling and extremely relaxed homeschooling are very popular. Most people who comment on these things push the quick/easy/cheap/free viewpoint, regardless of the age of the child.

 

 

I think regulations have little to do with it but more culture and attitudes towards educations. Many  curriculums that many here would  consider pathetic still satisfy high regulation state's requirements. I live in a state you are not even required to state you are homeschooling and yet there are tons of zealous moms in Classical Conversations or doing all sorts of rigorous curriculum for individual subjects plus tons of extra curricular activities. It is way more dependent on local culture than state regulation. 

Edited by frogger
Typos

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On 8/22/2018 at 10:31 AM, Tsuga said:

I have never heard anyone with educated children suggest that homeschooling could be done in a fraction of the time you can do public school. The kid spends less time in transition but the parent will ALWAYS spend more because of prep time. I think the rule is 2:1 prep to instruction right?

I would tell people to plan for that. So for a kindergartener with 30 minutes of reading and 30 minutes of math,. You have two hours of prep (choosing books, understanding literacy, creating the environment, learning to cope with opposition). You're already exceeding 95% of public school time expectations.

 

This isn't even close to being true for me. And my educated children are now educated adults.

How did you arrive at this ratio?

Editing to add: 30 minutes for reading a nd 30 minutes for Math is the about the limits for 1 on 1 direct instruction for me. 

That would include...

A fun warm-up that serves as a review

A more formal review

Intro of New material

Practice

Edited by unsinkable

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30 minutes ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

The thing is, a lot of those online public schools just have kids watching labs online now.  Or at least doing these virtual labs where you use a mouse to change a variable and then see the result.  I looked this up to make sure, and it is also happening in brick and mortar schools as well.  I'm not saying that it is good teaching but it isn't just homeschoolers. 

I guess there isn't any way around it if the entirety of the education is happening online. Could public schools even make a requirement that students obtain materials and conduct labs at home? Probably the best they could do is provide the materials and assign the lab as "homework," but I can't even begin to imagine the logistics of that. It's unfortunate. Technology has so many advantages but some things you really just need to get your hands on. 

9 minutes ago, mom2scouts said:

High school science may be the toughest subject to teach at home. DS is extremely unlikely to pick a science major at this point, but I want to leave him options. I can't afford to outsource much and did a combination of online and simple home based biology labs last year. For chemistry, we are fortunate enough to have a family member who is a chemist with access to a real lab and he is teaching the lab part for us and only charging for materials.

That's so great that you have that connection! We have a friend who teaches physiology at the university level who will be helping us out when we get there. And we are very lucky to live in a state that provides tuition-free DE at community colleges. But I agree that science is by far the most difficult (and probably most expensive) subject to home educate. I am feeling better about my ability to pull it off now that I have found a curriculum that works for us, but still it's daunting. So I completely understand why online labs would be appealing. But I don't think I could ever feel that I'd provided a solid education without providing hands-on lab experience in some form or fashion.

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16 minutes ago, PeachyDoodle said:

I guess there isn't any way around it if the entirety of the education is happening online. Could public schools even make a requirement that students obtain materials and conduct labs at home? Probably the best they could do is provide the materials and assign the lab as "homework," but I can't even begin to imagine the logistics of that. It's unfortunate. Technology has so many advantages but some things you really just need to get your hands on. 

 

They could provide lab kits for use, just like many of us purchase from Home Science Tools.  Or they could assign experiments that use common household items.  It would require parental involvement of some kind, though. 

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53 minutes ago, 2ndGenHomeschooler said:

And another one asking for free online courses for middle school. ?

I see the “just watch labs online” thing too. I’m just starting 9th with my oldest but I thought half the point of labs was the process of actually doing them. I say that as a homeschool graduate whose only lab was dissecting a frog. 

 

Ha!  Your only lab was dissecting a frog and that's the only lab we didn't do.  My son did a bazillion labs in biology and chemistry.  There are only about 12 or so for his physics class (Derek Owens.)  I found it very valuable for him to actually *do* the labs. 

But for the dissecting, whenever I said, "Ok, we should dissect something," he'd look at me as if I'd just suggested we take a tiny little animal, kill it, and then cut it open into tiny pieces and spread its insides around on a tray. He was thoroughly horrified.  People on here told me to have him watch dissections online, or just wait for college.  I figured that since we did so many other labs, skipping the dissecting was just fine for us.  He can deal with it in college, if he takes classes that require dissecting.

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I read that guy who asked his $10 or less question and thought, "Ooo.  Bad timing, guy!" thinking back to this thread about people who try to homeschool for free without effort.  Though, it does look like that guy was willing to put in the effort, so he gets points for that.  

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2 hours ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

They could provide lab kits for use, just like many of us purchase from Home Science Tools.  Or they could assign experiments that use common household items.  It would require parental involvement of some kind, though. 

I looked at some of the classes designed to prepare kids for CLEP or other college transfer type classes, like Straighterline, and they usually require photos or video of the student doing the lab be submitted. 

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5 hours ago, 2ndGenHomeschooler said:

I didn’t even bother responding. Too many other responses already suggesting Easy Peasy and Khan academy. I’m in a no regulation state so unschooling and extremely relaxed homeschooling are very popular. Most people who comment on these things push the quick/easy/cheap/free viewpoint, regardless of the age of the child.

Sometimes I pass over commenting, feeling they aren’t after sound advice anyway. But other times my sense of justice for their kids is too strong and I just.have.toSay.SOMETHING  I suppose it goes back to my questions from earlier about whether we have a duty or responsibility to combat the misconceptions about “free” “easy” “handsoff” and the like, if not to help keep a good name for homeschooling then for those poor kids who are receiving a “free, easy, hands-off education.” ?

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24 minutes ago, Targhee said:

Sometimes I pass over commenting, feeling they aren’t after sound advice anyway. But other times my sense of justice for their kids is too strong and I just.have.toSay.SOMETHING  I suppose it goes back to my questions from earlier about whether we have a duty or responsibility to combat the misconceptions about “free” “easy” “handsoff” and the like, if not to help keep a good name for homeschooling then for those poor kids who are receiving a “free, easy, hands-off education.” ?

That's exactly where I am today. I am just so over seeing these posts! I am generally a pretty libertarian, to-each-his-own kind of person. But I just can't with these people who refuse to put in any time or effort, and don't even expect their kids to put in any time or effort either, especially in high school. I worry about where we will be 10 or 15 or 20 years from now.

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39 minutes ago, Targhee said:

Sometimes I pass over commenting, feeling they aren’t after sound advice anyway. But other times my sense of justice for their kids is too strong and I just.have.toSay.SOMETHING  I suppose it goes back to my questions from earlier about whether we have a duty or responsibility to combat the misconceptions about “free” “easy” “handsoff” and the like, if not to help keep a good name for homeschooling then for those poor kids who are receiving a “free, easy, hands-off education.” ?

Yes, me too. I comment often but I usually prefer to be one of the first. When there’s already 15-20 comments suggesting Easy Peasy I just move on. To be fair, I’ve never really looked at Easy Peasy or Khan myself. I just assumed it’s a you get what you pay for sort of thing. Maybe I should at least look at them before I dismiss them entirely.

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Here's another one just posted today on Facebook:

Good afternoon! I have a 10th grader and was wondering if y’all had any suggestions for cheap online curriculum that will only take around 3 hours a day to complete?

?

To be fair there are two comments of people saying that three hours is not enough time for high school. They were immediately berated  and told that "it depended upon the child." ?

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38 minutes ago, 2ndGenHomeschooler said:

Yes, me too. I comment often but I usually prefer to be one of the first. When there’s already 15-20 comments suggesting Easy Peasy I just move on. To be fair, I’ve never really looked at Easy Peasy or Khan myself. I just assumed it’s a you get what you pay for sort of thing. Maybe I should at least look at them before I dismiss them entirely.

Easy Peasy and Khan are both decent resources. And we all know that it is entirely possible to use mainly free resources (including the library!) and educate a child well.

What isn't going to work for almost any child--even fairly motivated teenagers--is just to show them a resource and expect them to do the rest on their own.

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9 minutes ago, maize said:

Easy Peasy and Khan are both decent resources. And we all know that it is entirely possible to use mainly free resources (including the library!) and educate a child well.

What isn't going to work for almost any child--even fairly motivated teenagers--is just to show them a resource and expect them to do the rest on their own.

I was about to say the exact same comment!

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1 hour ago, Chelli said:

Here's another one just posted today on Facebook:

Good afternoon! I have a 10th grader and was wondering if y’all had any suggestions for cheap online curriculum that will only take around 3 hours a day to complete?

?

To be fair there are two comments of people saying that three hours is not enough time for high school. They were immediately berated  and told that "it depended upon the child." ?

And also called "judgemental." ???

I refrained from pointing out the irony of that spelling error, but it wasn't easy.

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